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INMEMORIAM 



ANTHONY COSTA 
JACK BLAISDELL 
JOHN "SONNY" BALDWIN 
ELIZABETH COTTER 
MARGARET EATON 
JOHN M. GILLIS 
ESTHER L. RUSSELL 
EDMUND H. SARGENT 



(fiwu cover) 

As pan of the Sum House Flag Project, the Town of Wilmington 's flag was 
presented by Kristin Ftynn, West Intermediau School student and Ryan 
Trinchera, North InUrmediate School student during Flag Day ceremonies 
held at the Stau House on June 14. 1994. Wilmington 's town flay, along 
with other city and town flags, is mounted in the Hail of Gty and Town 
Flags, Slate House, Boston. 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




Title Page 

Accepted Streets 41 

ADA Advisory Committee 69 

Animal Control Officer 30 

Board of Appeals 70 

Board of Assessors 18 

Board of Health 48 

Board of Registrars 20 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 8 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 47 

Carter Lecture Fund 57 

Constable 21 

Council for the Arts 83 

Department of Public Works 86 

Directory of Officials 7 

Disabilities, Commission on 68 

Elderly Services Commission 66 

Fire Department 22 

Historical Commission 56 

Housing Authority 51 

Housing Partnership 40 

Inspector of Buildings 31 

Library 62 

Meeting Dates and Times 190 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 85 

Mission Statement 1 

Municipal Services Guide 12 

Officers & Department Heads 11 

Permanent Building Committee 21 

Planning/Conservation Department 32 

Police Department 26 

Public Buildings Department 57 

Recreation Commission 58 

Redevelopment Authority 47 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 65 

School Department 92 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational High School 104 

Telephone Directory by Department 191 

Town Accountant 167 

Town Clerk 19 

Town Collector/Treasurer 16 

Town Counsel 52 

Town Manager 4 

Town Meetings. . . . Special State Primary - February 1, 1994 107 

Special State Election - March 1, 1994 107 

Annual Town Election - April 16, 1994 108 

Annual Town Meeting - April 23, 1994 109 

State Primary - September 20, 1994 159 

Special Recount - October 3, 1994 162 

State Election - November 8, 1994 163 

Veterans Services 61 

Water & Sewer Department 90 



^ printed on recycled paper 



The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 



"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 
Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion must 
govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the Town. 
Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important 
resource and the key to its success in serving the people of 
Wilmington. " 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



-1- 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Calendar year 1994 was marked by a carryover of several issues from the prior 
year as well as several new initiatives. 

The Board continues to have major concerns with the plans for the 
reconstruction of the bridge at the intersection of Main Street and Route 62. 
The Massachusetts Highway Department plans to construct a four lane bridge and 
to eliminate parking on Church Street and Main Street near the intersection. 
Such a plan will create a major negative impact on those businesses in the 
immediate vicinity of the bridge. Construction is slated to start in 1995. 
The Selectmen will continue to call for a meeting with officials of the 
Massachusetts Highway Department in an effort to have these concerns 
addressed. 

While the Interstate 93/Route 129 interchange reconstruction project is listed 
on the fiscal 1995-1997 transportation improvement plan, construction is not 
anticipated to begin for several years. The Selectmen will continue to 
monitor the status of this project to ensure that Wilmington's interests are 
taken into consideration. 

The Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) has continued in its efforts to 
force the Town of Wilmington to serve as its collection agent for Wilmington 
residents who are delinquent in the payment of their electric bills. While 
the Board has had several meetings with representatives from RMLD, the issue 
remains unresolved. A majority of the Selectmen seriously question the merits 
of allowing RMLD to place municipal liens on the property of residents who 
have failed to pay their electric bill. RMLD has suggested that it may take 
the issue to court. 

The Board remains sensitive to the classroom space problems confronted by the 
School Department. The Selectmen supported placing a question on the 1994 
ballot as to whether residents wished to override the limits of Proposition 2 
1/2 to fund the reopening of the Boutwell School. While the override question 
was defeated at the April Town Elections, the Selectmen continued 
the dialogue with the School Committee over ways to address overcrowding in 
the school system. 

In an effort to enhance the town's resources for attracting business, the 
Selectmen authorized a measure to participate in the Center for Economic 
Development with the towns of Bedford and Burlington and the city of Woburn. 
The program, which is sponsored by the Massachusetts Office of Business 
Development, will serve as a clearinghouse of information to potential 
businesses who are seeking to locate their facilities in our area. 

In February of 1997, the town's cable television license will expire. In an 
effort to ensure that the town continues to receive cable television service 
and with an eye towards improving the quality of service, the Board has 
reactivated the Cable T.V. Advisory Task Force. The Board made several 
appointments to the task force. The Selectmen expect to receive a 
recommendation from the task force which will set the terms and conditions of 
the next license for cable service. 

In November, the town held its first Adopt-A-Road Pickup. The program was 
directed at reducing the litter problem on many of our town streets. Thanks 
to strong support from the community, a number of streets were cleaned. 



-2- 



Board members endorsed the appointments of the Town Manager to the Committee 
on Unaccepted Ways. The committee was created at the April 1994 Annual Town 
Meeting to develop recommendations to address the problems, including street 
maintenance, associated with unaccepted ways. 

The Board directed the Town Manager to prepare an article for the April 1995 
Annual Town Meeting which would establish a Scholarship/Educational Fund. 
Property tax bills would include a separate form which would allow taxpayers 
to voluntarily contribute an amount of money specifically for scholarships. 
In addition, the Board has authorized the preparation of an article which 
would create a Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-off Program. Senior citizens 
who qualify will have an opportunity to work on a limited basis for the town 
in exchange for a small credit on their property tax bill. 

The Board wishes to acknowledge the effort of Jay Tighe for bringing a very 
entertaining weekend of softball to Wilmington in the form of the Men's 
Modified Fast Pitch National Tournament held during Labor Day Weekend. For 
the second time in two years the Board congratulates the Wilmington High 
School Girl's Softball team for another championship season. Thanks are also 
in order for the gracious donation of approximately 1.23 acres of land to the 
town by Mrs. Amelia G. Booth. The Board thanks Gregory Anderson 
and his fellow Boy Scouts for their efforts to make repairs to the walking 
trail at Brown's Crossing. The Selectmen also wish to thank the many 
residents and local business people who were involved in the successful 
Lubbers Brook clean-up. 

To the Town Manager and the dedicated employees and volunteers of the town, 
thank you for your continued efforts to make Wilmington a great place to work 




Seated left to right: Selectman Diane M. Allan. Chairman Michael V. McCoy, Selectman Gerald R. Duggan. Standing left to right: 
Selectman Robert J. Cain and Selectman Chester A. Bruce. 



Town of Wilmington 

121 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON MA 01887 



OFFICE OF THE 
TOWN MANAGER 
(508) 658 3311 



FAX (508) 658 3334 
TTY (508) 694. 141 7 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

Thomas Jefferson once said, "....As new discoveries are made, new truths discovered 
and manners and opinions change with the change of circumstances, institutions must 
advance also to keep pace with the times". The words of the nation's third 
president are as significant today as they were when first spoken some two hundred 
years ago. The ability to adapt to the constant pressure of increased demands is a 
measure of a municipality's commitment to its future. 

The Town of Wilmington continues to be one of Massachusetts' most desirable 
communities in which to live. In 1994, Wilmington ranked ninth in home building 
activity among Eastern Massachusetts communities. Federal census statistics 
indicate that the town is among the fastest growing communities in the Greater 
Lowell and Merrimack Valley areas. The Town Clerk projects a population approaching 
20,000 residents by the end of 1995. Every indication is that Wilmington will, at 
least for the immediate future, continue to increase its residential base. A 
growing community is a sign of a town's health and vitality. In order to maintain 
such health and vitality, community leaders must meet the challenge of managing new 
growth. 

The town's recent emphasis in stabilizing its financial position is a clear 
indication of the town's willingness to prepare for the future. Over the past 
several years, town government has reduced debt, slowed the growth of personnel, 
funded and resolved serious tax liabilities and reinstituted a program for capital 
expenditures. The town has made positive strides in reducing its receivables. In 
Fiscal Year 1992, the town collected just over $200,000 in tax titles. This figure 
is contrasted with collections over the last six months of calendar year 1994 of 
nearly $700,000. New growth, the resolution of outstanding tax liabilities, 
conservative forecasting of revenues and the continuation of an austere operational 
spending pattern has better enabled Wilmington to meet the demands of a growing 
population. 

Wilmington is as equally attractive to businesses as it is to homeowners. The 
town's continued focus on economic development is evidenced by its low commercial 
vacancy rate which currently hovers under 5%. In September of 1994, International 
Paper Company opened its New England Division Headquarters for Carter Rice/the Dowd 
Company in its renovated 480,000 square foot facility on Main Street. Earlier that 
same month. Analog began construction on a $10M state-of-the-art research and 
technology center. Among companies who have relocated their businesses to 
Wilmington in 1994 are Visibility, a 100 employee high technology company and Por 
Shun, Inc., a fast growing distributor of quality dairy products. Perhaps the 
single most significant indicator of Wilmington's economic turnaround can be found 
on Research Drive where the Schelzi Company has built a 150,000 square foot research 
and development building on speculation. 

A major package of zoning revisions was recommended by the Town Center Committee and 
subsequently adopted at Town Meeting. The rezoning, which included the 
establiBhment of a Central Bueinefla District, is designed to revitalize and improve 
the economic development of the Route 38 corridor. At years end, the Board of 
Selectmen appointed a townwide Economic Development Commission to broaden the work 
of the Town Center Committee. 



-4- 



The town's two year old Small Cities Program reached a successful conclusion. The 
$600,000 state grant contributed to the rehabilitation of thirty-one houses and 
assisted seven Wilmington families to purchase their first home. In addition, more 
than 190 residents benefitted from the program's unique Employment Assistance 
Program. 

The town continues to place great emphasis on the management of its property. 
Several parcels of town-owned land were sold, the proceeds of which were deposited 
in a Capital Stabilization Fund. Two and one-half acres of town-owned land and five 
and one-half acres of donated land were transferred to the care and custody of the 
Conservation Commission. A consortium of community, business and government leaders 
joined to sponsor the first and highly successful Wilmington Watershed Clean-up Day 
and Wilmington's Selectmen organized the first ever Adopt-a-Road Clean-up Program. 
The community continued its program of designating town-owned land for affordable 
housing. Eight parcels were approved for disposition at the 1994 annual town 
meeting which will result in the construction of five affordable homes for 
Wilmington residents. At the end of the year, the first affordable home to be built 
on town-owned land was sold to a resident of Wilmington. 

One of the more important initiatives of 1994 was the reinstitut ion of the town's 
sidewalk construction program. Town meeting members appropriated $61,280 which 
enabled Department of Public Works crews to construct sidewalks on High Street to 
the Woburn Street School and on Woburn and Wildwood Streets to the Wildwood Street 
School. The town completed work on the newly constructed High School softball field 
and made significant public safety improvements to the intersections of Woburn and 
Wildwood Streets and at Nichols Street at the Tewksbury line. Drainage improvements 
were made at more than twenty locations and the paving of streets in several areas 
of town was accomplished through the use of Chapter 90 construction funds. The 
Route 125/Andover Street traffic improvement project was completed in 1994. The 
town dedicated a plaque in memory of Peter Breen who spearheaded the project. For 
the second year in a row, town crews battled constant snowfall. Once again, funds 
from the reserve account were needed to balance the Snow and Ice Account budget. 

The initial phase of a graphic information system was completed for use by the Water 
Department and the new meter reading system was implemented, the initial results of 
which have demonstrated a substantial savings to the town. Engineering contracts 
were awarded for the design of a new vault and altitude valve at the Nassau Avenue 
storage tank and for improvements to the Industrial Way pressure boosting station. 
The Water and Sewer Department conducted a lead and copper testing program and 
sponsored a successful household hazardous waste collection day in October. 

Town meeting members improved the town's capital stock by authorizing the purchase 
of five police cruisers, two DPW trucks and a heavy duty modular type ambulance. 
The new ambulance complemented the purchase of a fully equipped pumper/rescue 
vehicle delivered earlier in the year. The town meeting also appropriated funding 
to begin the installation of a diesel exhaust system at the Fire Station and to 
remove fuel tanks at the Fire and Police Stations. Safety equipment upgrades were 
authorized at the Fire Department while the Police Department was given the green 
light to install an improved computerized information system. 

The town continues to implement its Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition 
Plan by making improvements to all of its facilities. Most significant in 1994 was 
the installation of a handicapped chairlift at the Shawsheen School. Raised 
lettered and braille signs were installed at four schools in the first phase of the 
town's ADA signage project. Evacuation chairs were made available for multi-storied 
buildings and improvements were made to handicapped accessible facilities at the 
Town Hall. A major section of the roof at the Wildwood School was repaired and the 
town brought water and electric service to the utility building and refreshment 
stand at the high school football field. Backflow preventers were installed at 
eleven town facilities in order to comply with the Massachusetts Safe Drinking Water 
Act. A joint effort of business, town employees and Shawsheen Tech students, under 
the supervision of the Public Buildings Department, resulted in the construction of 
a four bay extension at the Fire Station. This was but one example of Wilmington's 
exceptional business/government partnership. 

Recognizing the importance of providing quality human services, the town funded two 
additional full-time positions in the Library and upgraded the Respite Care Provider 
position in the Elderly Services Department to full-time status. The town replaced 
the Library's microfilm/microfiche reader printer and is awaiting the delivery of a 



-5- 



computerized reading machine the funding of which emanated from the efforts of the 
Wilmington Commission on Disabilities. Programs sponsored by the Library, Elderly 
Services and Recreation Departments continue to attract record numbers of 
participants. 

The successful solicitation of grant funding has enhanced the town's ability to 
offer quality programs and services. The Tobacco Control Program funded by a 
$22,000 grant from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health is fully 
operational and has supported numerous educational and enforcement programs. The 
Police Department's Community Policing grant from the Massachusetts Committee on 
Criminal Justice was renewed in October in the amount of $50,000. All department 
personnel have been trained in the community policing philosophy and, in addition, a 
Citizens Advisory Committee was established to support the department's exciting and 
innovative approach to neighborhood policing and conflict resolution. The Police 
Department has expanded its DARE program to the middle schools and has received 
outside funding for this program as well as several other enforcement related 
projects. Grants have been received in other departments for recycling, composting 
and highway safety kits as well as for elderly outreach programs. 

Town meeting members adopted several changes to the Inhabitant By-laws. Amendments 
to the By-laws included the elimination of the town curfew and the removal of the 
quorum requirement for town meetings. The town transferred responsibility for 
emergency management services to the Fire Department enabling a more coordinated and 
full-time approach to emergency response. The Board of Selectmen sponsored Jason 
Bere Day in the Town of Wilmington to honor the accomplishments of one of 
Wilmington's most talented young athletes. The Board celebrated Flag Day in style 
with a State House presentation of the town flag by two Wilmington students. 

Two major initiatives, one regional and the other local, accounted for significant 
savings and increased revenue. The twenty-three member communities of the North 
East Solid Waste Committee (NfiSWC) will save approximately $5.00 per ton on trash 
disposal over a ten year period as a result of successful negotiations to increase 
the sale price of electricity from NESWC to the Massachusetts Electric Company. 
Wilmington's aggressive implementation of a personal property assessment program 
accounted for $300,000 in new revenue this past year. 

Municipal government experienced several changes to its roster of employees and 
community officials. Michael Woods replaced Paul Niman as Superintendent of the 
Water and Sewer Department. Philip Meriam retired after twenty-three years as 
Wilmington's Library Director and was replaced by long time Children's Services 
Librarian, Sarah Rueter. Lieutenant Joseph Lundergan retired from the Fire 
Department and Elizabeth Coville left her post as Assistant Town Treasurer following 
sixteen years of dedicated town service. Finance Committee member Thomas Casey, 
MAPC representative Jay Donovan and Reverend Michael Stotts of the Housing 
Partnership all stepped down from their important positions. One of the town's 
longest serving officials, William Hooper, retired after twenty-six years of 
outstanding service on the Wilmington Planning Board. 

The town is grateful for the generosity of all of its citizens. Wilmington has long 
benefitted from a distinctive community spirit which sets our town apart from many 
others. Thanks to that spirit Wilmington is well-poised to meet any "change of 
circumstances" and ever prepared to "keep pace with the times". 

Respectfully submitted. 




Town Manager 



-6- 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1. 1995 



Board of Selectmen 



Michael V. McCoy, Chairman 
Chester A. Bruce, Jr. 
Gerald R. Duggan 
Diane M. Allan 
Robert J. Cain 



1996 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1997 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



1997 



School Committee 



Paul R. Palizzolo, Chairman 
Robert W. Young, Vice Chairman 
Madeleine A. Leger, Secretary 
Bradford L. Jackson 
Linda T. McMenimen 
James A. Demos 
Robert E. Surran 



1995 
1996 
1997 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1997 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty III, Vice Chairman 

Steven W. Leet, Secretary 

John M. Walsh 

Ann Yurek 

William A. Cole 

Anthony P, Capuano 

Richard D. Duggan 

Robert D. Ennis 



1997 
1996 
1997 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1997 



-7- 



Boards, CommitteeB & Commissions 1994 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals. Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 1996 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 1995 

Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 1997 

Donald C. Armstrong, Assoc. 1995 

Anita H. Backman, Assoc. 1995 

John R. Forrest, Assoc. 1995 



Assessors. Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

Jcimes J. Russo 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 

Michael Niestepski, V. Chmn. 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Secretary 

Joseph Castronovo 

Alan C. Hunter 

Henry C. Latta 

Anne K. Marshall 

Judson W. Miller 

Edward J. Riopelle 

Samuel Schauerman 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 



H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1995 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 1997 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 1996 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas. 1997 

Adele C. Passmore 1995 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Jr., Chmn. 1997 

William H. Russell 1995 

Willis C. Lyford 1996 

Conservation Commission 

Lynne S. Guzinski, Chairman 1996 

James H. Morris, V. Chairman 1995 

Gary W. Mercer 1995 

John A. White, Jr. 1995 

William F. C. Gately 1996 

M. Barbara Sullivan 1997 

Gail L. Mahar 1997 

Disabilities. Wilmington Commission On 

Richard Gage, Chairman 1996 

Lillian N. Brown 1995 

Frank A. Botte 1995 

Phyllis P. Genetti 1996 

Laurence W. Curtis 1997 

Charlotte A. Guthrie 1997 

Gerald R. Duggan 1997 



Term 
Expires 



Elderly Services Commission 

Evelyn T. Kaminski, Chairman 1997 

Rocco V. DePasquale, V. Chmn. 1996 

Lillian N. Brown 1995 

Joseph C. Filipowicz 1995 

Henry C. Latta 1995 

Marilyn K. McCarthy 1996 

Grace Kirkland 1997 

Health. Board of 

James A. Ficociello, Chairman 1995 

Joseph A. Paglia 1996 

Milton E. Calder, Sr. 1997 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 1996 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treasurer 1995 

James T. Murray 1996 

Jean M. Rowe 1996 

Frank J. West 1997 

Housing Authority 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr., Chimn. 1998 

♦Lillian Hopper, V. Chmn. 1998 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr., Sec. 1997 

Dorothy A. Butler, Treas. 1995 

Melvin F. Keough 1996 
*Rep. of State Housing Authority 

Housing Partnership 

Mark T. Haldane, Chairman 1997 

Raymond G. Forest, V. Chmn. 1997 

Charles E. Boyle 1997 

Robert J. Cain 1997 

Rev. Thomas F. Dean 1997 

Rocco V. DePasquale 1997 

Gregory P. Erickson 1997 

James A. Ficociello 1997 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr. 1997 

Carole S. Hamilton 1997 

Melvin F. Keough 1997 

Bruce MacDonald 1997 

James J. Russo 1997 

Lester E. White 1997 
Lynn Goonin Duncan, Director 



-8- 



Boarda. Committees & Commissions 1994 



Term 
Expires 



Library Trustees 

Patricia F. Duggan, Chmn. 1997 

Martha K. Stevenson, V. Chmn. 1995 

Lawrence P. Flaherty 1995 

James F. Banda 1996 

Anne Buzzell 1996 

Kenneth J. Miller 1997 

Permanent Building Committee 

Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 1996 

Alberto Angles, Jr. 1995 

Mark T. Haldane 1996 

Michael P. Dolan 1997 

Paul J. Melaragni 1997 

Planning Board 

Richard A. Longo, Chairman 1995 

Carole S. Hamilton, Clerk 1997 

James L. Diorio 1996 

Austin L. Rounds 1998 

Michael A. Roache 1999 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 1997 

C. Michael Burns, V. Chmn. 1996 

James J. Buckley, Sec. 1997 

Paul J. Bova 1995 

Larry G. Noel 1995 



Recycling Advisory Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Kevin Brander 

Elizabeth D. Harriman 

Anne C. Leary 

Thomas A. Ollila 

Joseph A. Paglia 

Robert P. Palmer 

Rev. Judy Thomson 

Edward P. Tripp, III 



Redevelopment Authority 

Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman 1998 

Charles N. Gilbert, V. Chrmn. 1996 

John H. Creeth, Secretary 1995 



Patricia F. Duggan*, Treasurer 1998 

Sidney R. Kaizer, Asst. Treas. 1995 
* State Appointment 

Regional Vocational Technical School 
Committee 

Robert G. Peterson 1995 

James M. Gillis 1997 



Term 
Expires 

Registrars, Board of 

Audrey E. Riddle, Chairman 1997 
Barbara J. Buck 1995 
Edward L. Sousa 1996 
Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Town Forest Committee 

Robert P. Palmer, Chairman 1997 

Paul C. Duggan 1995 

Forrest G. Downs 1996 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris 
Joseph R. Peters 
Lorraine Dineen 

Unaccepted Ways. Committee On 

Diane M. Allan 

Robert J. Cain 

Richard Capone 

Lynn Duncan 

Cheryl Dunn 

Harold Gillam 

Randi Holland 

William Hooper 

Walter Kaminski 

Robert Palmer 

Michael Roache 

Vincent Scifo 

Martha Stevenson 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Noel D. Baratta, Sr., Chairman 1996 



Neil E. Waisnor 1995 

Edwin P. Tripp, III 1997 

Wilmington Arts Council 

David J. Maison, Chairman 1995 

H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 1995 

Jane Crane, Rcdg. Sec. 1995 

Frances Keough, Corr. Sec. 1995 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 1996 

Daniel H. Ballou, Sr. 1995 

Annette Campbell 1995 

Evelyn Choate Gibbs 1995 

Renee M. Assetta 1996 

Carmelo J. Corsaro 1996 

Marguerite Elia 1996 

Bruce E. Jope 1996 

Edith M. Michelson 1996 

Augustine E. Rice 1996 

Francis T. Toohey 1996 

A. Terry Vincent 1996 



-9- 



Boards. Committees & Commissions 1994 

Term Term 
Expires Expires 



Wilmington Election Officers 



Precinct 1 Annually 

Mary D'Eon, Warden 

Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 

Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 

Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clk. " 

Clarice J. Ross, Insp. 

Edith Ann Graham, Insp. 

Marjorie Metcalfe, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 4 Annually 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 

William H. Russell, Dep. Warden 

Elizabeth Coville, Dep. Clerk 

Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 

Joan Searfoss, Inspector 

Mary J. Johnson, Inspector " 

Anita Backman, Dep. Inspector " 



Precinct 2 

Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jean Buck, Dep. Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Patricia Cagnina, Inspector 
Shirley Pumfrey, Dep. Insp 
Elizabeth Grise, Dep. Insp. 



Pecinct 5 

Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Dep. Clerk 
Sandra Curtin, Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Inspector 
Jeanne LeFavour, Dep. Inspector 
Joan Goulet, Deputy Inspector 
Melissa Nobile, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct 3 

Mary E. Woods, Warden 

Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 

Ruth J. Bedell, Clerk 

Norinne M. Markey, Insp. 

Minnie Kirby, Inspector 

Alice Marcy, Dep. Insp. " 

Beverly Vokey, Dep. Inspector " 



Precinct 6 

Nancy J. Tarricone, Warden 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Warden 
Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Clerk 
Jean Draper, Inspector 
Marion C. Murphy, Dep. Inspector 



-10- 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1995 



Account a 


Michael Morris 








Admin i.s^r&^ i ve AsBls^dn^ 


Margaret A. Tarantino 




658- 


'3311 


Anlmdl Control / I n spec tor 


Ellen G. Davis 




658- 


•7845 


Assxst&nt Town McinciQeir 


Jeffrey M. Hull 




658- 


' J J ± 1 


AssessoiTf Piri.nci.pdX 


Humphrey J. (Skip) Moynihan 


658- 


•367 5 




Charles L. Ellsworth 




658- 


■3078 


TTlHovlvf ^OT"vi^on Oir'or'^rtT" 

C«XUCX.Xy OC^VXWCD wXXCWUU'X 


Edith Cunningham 




657- 


■7 595 


Finance Director 


Joseph R. Peters 




658- 


■3531 


Fire Chief 


Daniel R. Stewart 




658- 


■3346 


Housing Authority Exec. Director 


Kenneth G. Dorrance 




658- 


■8531 


Inspector of Buildings 


James J. Russo* 




658- 


■4531 


Ipswich Watershed Commission 


Herbert D. Nickerson 




658- 


■4207 


Librarian 


Sarah L. Rueter 




658- 


•2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 


Michael V. McCoy 




658- 


•3311 


Mass. Water Resource Authority 


Michael J. Woods 




658- 


•4711 


Metropolitan Ares. PldnnlnQ Council 


Lynn G. Duncan 




658- 


•8238 




Robert J. Cain 




658- 


•47 72 


nu£i»iicsaBw dwxxu tvobwc wuiibiix wco 


Michael A. Caira 




658- 


•3311 


Pi anni nn / f^r^nciOT"\/a^ 4 or* ni T"or*^^^i^ 


Lynn G. Duncan 




658- 


•82 38 


Plumbing and Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 




658- 


■3223 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 




658- 


■5071 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


Roger J. Lessard 




658- 


■3017 


Public Health Director 


Gregory P. Erickson 




658- 


■4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Ann FitzGerald, R.N. 




694- 


•2041 


Public Works Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 




658- 


•4481 


Reading Municipal Light Department 
Advisory Board 


Roger Lessard 
Kenneth Mastrullo 




658- 
658- 


■3017 
■5600 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 




658- 


■4270 


Redevelopment Authority/ Consultant 


Michael N. Matt 




657- 


■5649 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


James J. Babineau 


(617) 


665- 


•8301 




Kathleen M. Scanlon 




658- 


■2030 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 




658- 


•3388 


Town Engineer 


Harold R. Gillam 




658- 


■4499 


Town Manager 


Michael A. Caira 




658- 


■3311 








Veterans' Agent /Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 




694- 


■2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Michael Woods 




658- 


■4711 


Wiring Inspector 


Arthur T. Kelley 




658- 


■4531 



♦Resigned March 3, 1995 replaced by Daniel W. Paret 



-11- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPA L SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2nd & 4th Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the Town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Michael V. McCoy, Chairman 
Diane M. Allan 
Chester A. Bruce, Jr. 
Robert J. Cain 
Gerald R. Duggan 



Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and recommend 
specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing 
the Town in all litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief 
Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive 
annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on 
behalf of the Town. 



Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the Town's health, workmans 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the Town's recycling program and insuring that the Town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant serves as the 
Town's designee on the MWRA Advisory Board; assists with the preparation of 
the annual budget and provides general assistance to the Town Manager in other 
areas of municipal administration. 



Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses, and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the Town records the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The Clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 



-12- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 
Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 658-2029 



The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve Town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the Town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the Town and prepares other financial records and reports 
as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the 
annual budget. 



Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property 
within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, 
except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, 
agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: (1) the 
valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised from 
property taxation and (3) property classification. 



Finance Director - Joseph R. Peters - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the Town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Finance Director monitors 
the Town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The 
department serves as custodian of all Town funds. All municipal bank accounts 
are controlled by this office. The tax title and foreclosure proceedings for 
non-payment of taxes are handled by the Finance Director. 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation, and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual 
proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations 
and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants related to 
planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public interest issues 
related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection of 
public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention 
of pollution, protection of fisheries, and protection of land containing 
shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include reviewing and 
inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with the Town and 
State wetlands statutes. In addition the department manages several pieces of 
property throughout Town which have been placed into the Town's custody as 
conservation land. 



-13- 



Building Tnaoector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors, and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 

Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspect ional services 
include restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and 
schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In addition 
the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, 
septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizens 
complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and hazardous 
waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. This includes 
an annual rabies clinic for dogs, and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, 
polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and 
cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In addition the nurse provides home 
health care visits to elderly residents of the Town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 — Emergency Number - 658-3200 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and 
extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety 
inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. All 
outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from the 
Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of fleunmable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Firefighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent patient transport. 

Police Chief - Bobby N. Stewart - 658-5071 — Emergency Number - 658-3331 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Robert P. Palmer - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas, and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 
problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the maintenance 
of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is 
responsible for the Town's public shade and ornamental trees and maintenance 
of the trees on the Town common. The Public Works Department is also 
responsible for the operation of the Town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 
systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 



-14- 



by the Water & Sewer Department. The Department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA). 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program 
for many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and leaf 
disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services for 
all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the Town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete 
set-up at all Town elections and the annual and special town meetings. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Edith L. Cunninqhem\ - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counselling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 



Library Director - Sarah L. Rueter - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library 
seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational library 
services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-six 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-six 
member towns. 



Recreation Director - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots program, summer recreation program for children, ladies fitness, day 
trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and 
a number of other programs. In addition the Recreation Department offers 
resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney World. 



Veterans Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 

The Veteran's Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans 
and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a 
large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of cash grants to 
cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent 
also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other programs 
administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 



-15- 



Town Collector/Treasurer 



COMMITMENTS 

1995 Real Estate 1 lagiso 51 

1995 Personal Property T';?q '^fn ia 

1994 Excise 1,349,728.16 
1993 Excise 
1992 Excise 
1991 Excise 
1990 Excise 
Ambulance 

Unapportioned Sewer 
Apportioned Sewer Paid in Full 
Interest 

Apportioned Sewer .^'i^Aig 
Interest li'lA ,1 

Apportioned Street Paid in Full 



Interest 



19,194.01 
250.00 
56.25 
7.50 
307,843.00 
345,328.60 
8,873.14 
390.92 



390.39 



Apportioned Street *'^°!*if 
Interest 

Apportioned Water nn 

Interest 832.07 

Sewer Lien 37,552.26 

Water Lien 248,437.77 

$27,741,606.65 



COLLECTIONS 

All Other 



1995 




1994 


Years 




Total 




Real Estate $11,003,196.00 


$12, 


210,884.81 


$334,910.87 


$23, 


548,991 


68 


Interest 13,217.34 




77,489.00 


56,052.59 




146,758 


93 


Charges 




1,995.00 


770.00 




2,765 


00 


Personal Property 250,488.02 




273,434.17 


2,031.10 




525,953 


29 


Interest 168.46 




1,416.16 


376.24 




1,960 


86 


Charges 




230.00 


10.00 




240 


00 


Water Liens 4,262.68 




93,575.56 


10,373.20 




108,211 


44 


Apportioned Water 




496.45 






496 


45 


Interest 




74.47 






74 


47 


Apportioned Street 














Paid in Full 




9,643.84 






9,643 


84 


Interest 




412.25 






412 


25 


Sewer Liens 




20,592.35 


557.48 




21, 149 


83 


Apportioned Sewer 11.81 




332.66 


20.06 




364 


53 


Interest 6.50 




150.62 


16.05 




173 


17 


Apportioned Sewer 














Paid in Full 




9,866.04 






9,866 


04 


Interest 




286.87 






286 


87 


Sewer Betterment 




19,146.50 


153.18 




19,299 


68 


Interest 




8,586.96 


131.58 




8,718 


.54 


Street Betterment 




5,334.13 


149.32 




5,483 


.45 


Interest 




2,704.92 


37.40 




2,742 


.32 


Water Betterment 




2,345.81 


708.80 




3,054 


.61 


Interest 




859.11 


141.75 




1,000 


.86 


Ambulance 




146,761.47 






146,761 


.47 


Lien Certificates 




26,475.00 






26,475 


.00 


Betterment Releases 




198.00 






198 


.00 


Excise Taxes 


1 


,324,005.18 




1 


,324,005 


.18 


Interest 




12,848.05 






12,848 


.05 


Charges 




18,657.00 






18,657 


.00 


Mark & Clear Fees 




16,851.00 






16,851 


.00 


Water Dept. Collections 


4 


,861,300.27 




4 


,861,300 


.27 


Miscellaneous 




5,016.20 






5.016 


.20 


TOTAL $11,271,350.81 


$19,151,969.85 


$406,439.62 


$30 


,829,760 


.28 



-16- 



Town of Wilmington Tax Title Collections 




Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1995 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 30,254,915.00 

Total Appropriations (Available) 1,485,960.00 31,740,875.00 

Total Deficit 468,863.00 

Special Education 6,652.00 

Energy Conservation 19,916.00 

County Retirement Assessment 1,07 5,574.00 

County Tax 44,174.00 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 400,640.00 

Air Pollution Districts 4,646.00 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 4,071.00 

Mosquito Control Project 23,642.00 

Amount Certified by Collector & 

Treasurer for Tax Title 26,000.00 

Overlay of Current Year 649,999.00 

Cherry Sheet Offsets 35,916.00 

M.W.R.A 1,248,479.00 

Final Court Judgements 85,000.00 

RMV Surcharge 4.980.00 4.098. 552 .00 

35,839,427.00 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

1994 Estimated Receipts from Local 

Aid 4,660,099.00 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 1,230,000.00 

Penalties and Interest on Taxes 320,000.00 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 270,000.00 

Charges for Services - Sewer 1,741,090.00 

Other Charges for Services 110,000.00 

Fees 40,000.00 

Rentals 7,800.00 

Departmental Revenue - Library 10,000.00 

Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 27,000.00 

Other Department Revenue 160,000.00 

Licenses and Permits 219,000.00 

Special Assessments 45,000.00 

Fines and Forfeits 150,000.00 

Investment Income 40,000.00 

Overestimates 650.00 

Voted from Available Funds 1,485.960.00 10, 516, 599.00 

25,322,828.00 

REAL ESTATE 

Residential 978,701,800 @ 12.29 p/t 12,028,245.00 

Commercial 110,500,900 @ 26.52 p/t 2,930,484.00 

Industrial 345,954,700 @ 26.52 p/t 9,174,719.00 

Personal Property 44,848,440 @ 26.52 p/t 1. 189. 381.00 

25,322,829.00 



-18- 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46. General Laws as amended; 



Births - Actually recorded for 1994 
Marriage Intentions recorded for 1994 
Marriages recorded for 1994 
Deaths recorded for 1994 



283 
108 
106 
232 



Chapter 46, Section 15; 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and 
registered hospital medical officers applying therefor, blanks for the return 
of births as required by law. 

Chapter 207. Sections 19. 20 & 40; 

Chapter 718, Acts of 1979 made changes to Sections 19 and 20 along with 
Section 40 and, as stated before in each annual report, anyone intending to 
marry should inquire of this office to see if any changes have been made in 
the laws as they are changing constantly. 

Chapter 207. Section 45; 

This chapter provides for the availablility of marriage records. 
Chapter 114. Sections 45. 46; 

One hundred forty-two burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as 
Special Agent to the Board of Health for the year. Nineteen out-of-state 
deaths were reported and filed in this office. Forty-four Wilmington veterans 
were buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 

Flammable Permits and Registrations; 

Flajnmable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk. 
Notice is sent to the owner or occupant of land where the storage is located 
on or about April 1st for renewal by April 30th of each year. Failure to 
register on time or to comply with the Board's regulations may result in 
revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Eighty-three flammable 
permits were issued during the year. 

Permits & Recordings; 

Uniform Commerical Code Recordings 445 

Uniform Commerical Code Terminations 87 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 153 

Federal Lien Recordings 19 

Federal Lien Releases 6 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 570 

Pole & Conduit Locations 13 

Dog Licenses 1358 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 8 

Other Services; 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. 
In this capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular 
monthly meeting night, kept the minutes of same up to date, supervised the 
Annual Town Census by mail, kept the voting list up to date, and registered 
voters during the regular office hours of the Town Clerk. She also meets with 
the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify 
nomination papers for candidates. 



-19- 



Town Meetings & Elections 1994: 



Special State Primary - February 1 
Special State Election - March 1 
Annual Town Election - April 16 
Annual Town Meeting - April 23 



State Primary - September 20 
Special Recount - October 3 

(Registrar of Deeds) 
State Election - November 8 



Residents casting votes during the State Election held November 8. 1994. 



Board of Registrars 

In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts 
of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted 
in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 & 63 and Chapter 51, 
Sections 26, 28, 29 and 30, all in accordance with the Town Charter and 
Inhabitant By-laws Revised of the Town of Wilmington. The Board of Registrars 
also conducted a recount on October 3, 1994 concerning the results of the 
Democratic primary. Registrar of Deeds office. 

This was a busy year. The Board also met many times for certification of 
signatures on nomination papers and assisted at town election and town 
meeting. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up 
with the changing election and census laws. 

The calendar year of 1994 had a total of 11,703 registered voters of our 
listed 18,488 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned 
their census forms in 1994 without delay. A true census is an asset to the 
town. 



-20- 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts: 



Special State Primary 



21st Middlesex Rep. District 
(Precinct 6 only) 



Special State Election - 21st Middlesex Rep. District 
(Precinct 6 only) 

Annual Town Meeting and Town Election 

State Primary Election 

State Election 



January 18, 1994 

January 18, 1994 
March 23, 1994 
August 15, 1994 
October 26,1994 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee has been meeting to review the space needs of 
the community and the public safety buildings for upgrading. 

Members of the Permanent Building Committee are Roger J. Lessard, Chairman, 
Mark T. Haldane, Alberto Angles, Jr., Michael P. Dolan and Paul J. Melaragni. 




Public Buildings Department and Permanent Building Committee Headquarters (formerly the Whitfield School). 



-21- 



Fire Department 



It is my pleasure to submit the following annual report of the operations, 
activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department for the year 
1994. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five Lieutenants and 
twenty-four Fire Fighters. One vacancy exists due to the resignation of Fire 
Fighter Andrew McRobb due to his reinstatement to the Gloucester Fire 
Department in November. There are also two civilian dispatchers. The 
following roster is provided: 

Departmental Roster 
Fire Chief 
Daniel R. Stewart 
Deputy Fire Chief 
Walter J. Sowyrda 
Lieutenants 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. John Brown, Jr. 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III Joseph T. McMahon 

Paul Welch 



Donald A. Ahern 
Robert J. Andersen 
Brian D. Anderson 
David J. Currier 
Gary J. Donovan 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 
Kenneth P. Gray 



Fire Fighters 

Richard J. Hughes 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Andrew W. Leverone 
Richard T. McClellan, Jr. 
John F. McDonough 
Terry McKenna 
Alfred W. Meuse 
Christopher J. Nee 



Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Stephen D. Robbins 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatchers 



Linda K. Abbott 



Christopher G. Pozzi 




Fire Fighters David R. Feyler and David P. Woods, members of Wilmington 's Water and Ice Rescue Team, stand before 
Wilmington 's new ambulance. 



-22- 



The department responded to a total of 2,249 calls during 1994. 



Residential Buildings 


10 


Out of town assistance 


170 


Commercial Buildings 


4 


Dumpster 


s 


Chimney, fireplaces &; 




False Alarms 


310 


Vehicles 


65 


Ambulance/Rescue 


1382 


Woodburning Stoves 


4 


Service Calls 


303 


Brush Grass or Rubbish 


98 


Hazardous Materials 


6 


Estimated value of property 


endangered was $11,338,500. Estimated 


propei 


lose was $1,225,600. 








The following is a list of 


permits issued; 






Black Powder 


4 


Propane 


57 


Blasting 


42 


Report 


40 


Class C Explosive 





Smoke Detector 


237 


Fire Alarm 


187 


Tank 


64 


Flammable Liquid 


11 


Miscel laneous 


5 


Oil Burner 


172 


Sprinkler 


34 


Fleunmable Decorations 


3 


Tank Truck 


5 


Subpoena 


1 







As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, nursing 
homes and flammable storage facilities were inspected by the Fire Prevention 
Bureau under the direction of Lt . Joseph McMahon. Other inspections are as 
follows : 



Construction Plans Review 189 

New Construction Residential 60 

New Construction Industrial 129 
Fire Inspection Industrial/ 

Commercial 325 

Underground Tank Removals 36 

Underground Tank Installations 

Oil Burner 172 

Propane 35 



Compliance with the town's Underground Tank Bylaw continued to provide 
successful results in protecting the environment and drinking water supplies. 
Thirty-six underground tanks were removed in 1994 under the supervision of 
Deputy Chief Walter Sowyrda. Since passage of the bylaw, 293 underground 
tanks have been removed from the ground. 

Shift personnel inspected 237 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with M.G.L. 148, Sec. 26F. 

The Juvenile Firesetters Program continued to provide successful results in 
this critical area. Teamwork with the Police Department and School Department 
in awareness, recognition and case management are key elements of the program. 
Twelve confidential cases were processed in 1994. 

All classroom Grades K-5 were visited by fire fighters and discussed various 
safety issues. Fire Fighter Robert Patrie instructed fire prevention at the 
Abundant Life School. 

Fire Fighters David Feyler and David Woods graduated from the Massachusetts 
Firefighting Academy 11 week recruit program. 

EPI Pen Certification - 18 fire fighters became certified in the epinephrine 
auto injector program. This skill level upgrade will greatly reduce 
complications to patients suffering from anaphylactic shock. 



-23- 



Confined Space Rescue - A 
new progreun was introduced 
in the Fire Department under 
the supervision of Deputy 
Chief Walter Sowyrda. This 
joint effort with private 
industry has and will 
continue to provide training 
and equipment to the fire 
fighters involved in this 
highly technical and 
specialized form of rescue. 

Water/Ice Rescue - With 
assistance from the 
Merrimack Valley Dive Rescue 
Teeun, this new program was 
developed to improve the 
department's capabilities in 
dealing with these types of 
incidents. Some basic 
equipment has already been 
purchased as we work toward 
our goal of improving this 
service. 

In a joint effort with private industry. I lu n,j\.i!tiu'ni personnel train for 
Large Diameter Hose - All confined space rescues. 

three front line pumpers 
were upgraded this past year 

with four inch hose. This upgrade doubled our capabilities of water supply on 
the fireground, greatly improving the efficiency of daily operations. 

Fire Station Addition - A four bay extension was completed on the rear of the 
building. This project was made possible through the generosity of Admiral 
Roofing, Red-E-Mix Corporation and DiCenso Realty Corp. Construction was 
accomplished by Shawsheen Tech students. The project was under the direction 
of Public Buildings Superintendent Roger Lessard. Also assisting with the 
planning and construction were DPW Superintendent Robert Palmer and Building 
Inspector James Russo and their respective staffs. This project will 
temporarily help to alleviate serious space restrictions until a new station 
can be built. 




New Pumper and Ambulance - These capital outlay items were delivered this 
year and placed in service. A special thank you to the Town Manager, DPW 
Superintendent, DPW Mechanics and Fire Fighters Steven Robbins, Robert Woods, 
Linda Giles, Gary Robichaud, Richard Hughes and Terry McKenna for your 
cooperation and hard work on these projects. 




-24- 



Cotnmunitv Partnership - Many improvements in equipment and training were made 
possible through the participation and generosity of several local concerns: 
Admiral Roofing, AGFA Corporation, E. C. Whitney & Sons, International Paper, 
Wilmington Arena Authority, Winchester Hospital, Wilmington Rotary Club and 
Zeneca Resins were some of the groups that helped improve fire protection and 
emergency medical services in 1994. 

Eddy - (Substance abuse production at WHS). Fire fighters participated in the 
program to help increase awareness of this problem. 

WHS Chemistry Lab Cleanup - Under the supervision of Lt. McMahon, arrangements 
were made with Zeneca Resins to dispose of potentially dangerous and outdated 
chemicals at no cost to the town. Zeneca absorbed the cost of several 
thousand dollars in the spirit of cooperation with the town. 

Wilmington High School National Honor Society students, under the direct 
supervision of Mrs. Boudreau and Dispatcher/Clerk Linda Abbott assisted in 
upgrading the record data base of the Fire Department. 

Minuteman Home Care Retiree Bernice Collins worked twenty hours per week under 
this grant program inputting fire department reports into the data base. Her 
help is greatly appreciated. Dispatcher/Clerk Linda Abbott supervised this 
project . 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Paul Welch reports the following for 1994: 

All circuits and master boxes were tested and repaired. One street box was 
reconditioned and installed at Route 125 and Andover Street on a pedestal 
purchased by the Massachusetts Highway Department. A number of poles were 
struck by motor vehicles in 1994 causing damage to the municipal circuit 
including Box 137 at Main Street and Grove Avenue. Labor and materials were 
later reimbursed by the responsible insurance companies. The number of master 
boxes on the system is 165 with 18 street boxes for a system total of 183. 

The following boxes were added in 1994: 



With deepest regrets, the past year saw the passing of two long time 
associates of the Wilmington Fire Department, Ed Sargent and Tom Buckle. They 
will be missed. 

Department goals include the continued upgrade of apparatus and equipment, 
improvement of training and operating procedures for all levels of the 
department, expansion of community outreach programs such as CPR training, 
analysis of staffing levels and work with appropriate departments to develop 
plans for a new fire station. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff, the 
Assistant Town Manager, Department Heads and Staff, the Board of Selectmen and 
the many organizations for their assistance during the past year. 

A very special thank you to the members of the Wilmington Fire Department for 
your support, participation and enthusiasm in providing a well rounded and 
highly professional level of public safety service to the Town of Wilmington. 



644 

6345 
6346 
6364 
6612 



Street Box at Route 125 and Andover Street 
Swix Sports, 261 Ballardvale Street 
Fixtronics, 265 Ballardvale Street 
Anthem Electronics, 200 Research Drive 
Laun Research, 16 Jonspin Road 



-25- 



Police Department 

In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year of 1994. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 1994; and, for the most part 
the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police Department. 
During 1994, the total number of complaints and incidents reported to the 
Police Department decreased slightly from 10,263 incidents in 1993 to 9,840 
during 1994. For the most part, these decreases were from throughout the 
various crime categories and service related incidents. Several of the 
serious crime categories decreased significantly during 1994. Breaking and 
entering into homes and buildings decreased by 21% from 128 incidents in 1993 
to 108 during 1994. Armed robberies decreased from 5 incidents during 1993, 
to 2 during 1994. Totals for assaults and batteries increased by 13 from 76 
in 1993 to 89 in 1994. Motor vehicles stolen in Wilmington decreased by 47% 
from 77 in 1993 to 41 in 1994. 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be a serious 
community problem. However, during 1994 the Police Department experienced a 
4.4% decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. In 1994, motor vehicle 
accidents decreased by 30 accidents from 676 accidents in 1993 to 646 during 
1994. This slight decrease is viewed as resulting from the effects of 
increased enforcement efforts and the mild weather conditions during November 
and December. 



The Police Department has, for several years, placed a high priority on the 
enforcement of motor vehicle violations. During 1994, motor vehicle 
violations cited increased by 26%. The department cited 3,491 motor vehicle 
violations during 1994, this is an increase of 922 over the violations cited 
during 1993. The following are the totals for some of the major areas of 
concern, speeding violations 1,568, operators license violations 97, 
unregistered and uninsured 86; and miscellaneous violations 1,232. Arrests 
for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol decreased by 8 
from 52 in 1993 to 44 in 1994. 



Arrests 
for crimes 
other than 
motor 
vehicle 
offenses 
during 
1994 
totaled 
469. The 
Police 
Department 
continued 
to place a 
high 

priority 
on alcohol 
and drug 
related 
offenses. 
As a 
result, 
arrests 
for liquor 
law 

violations totaled 150, and there was a total of 49 narcotics arrests made 
during 1994. In addition to motor vehicle and other criminal arrests, the 
Department placed a total of 149 persons under protective custody. A total of 
716 persons were taken into custody by the Police Department during 1994. 




DARE Officer Chip Bruce shows off his new transport — an old cruiser spiffed up with help from local businesses. 



-26- 



In 1993, the Department began a process of evaluating how we provide public 
safety and law enforcement services in Wilmington. It was apparent that if we 
were to continue providing the high level of public service expected of us, 
with reduced resources, we would need to be more efficient and effective in 
addressing the problems of the community. As part of this process, the 
Department reviewed cases where we had been most effective with eliminating 
problems. We found that, in the majority of those cases, there was a 
continuity of the officers involved in the cases from start to finish and 
there was a close working relationship with the resident of the community. We 
also reviewed the changes occurring in law enforcement in the larger cities 
and their implementation of community oriented policing. While the Department 
viewed the city models, walking beats, etc., as impractical for a town such as 
Wilmington, we did find that the basic philosophy of community policing would 
provide the foundation for the Department to be more effective in its delivery 
of services. In 1993, the Police Department and the community made a 
commitment to adopt this philosophy as a total concept for our community. Our 
primary objective was to establish a partnership between the Police Department 
and the community, which would identify public safety and enforcement problems 
in the neighborhoods, and would establish effective methods for achieving the 
police and community goals. The Police Department developed a plan for the 
initial implementation of community policing in Wilmington. That plan was 
submitted in response to a request for proposals from the Massachusetts 
Committee on Criminal Justice and, as a result, the Department was awarded a 
$75,000 grant for the initial implementation. This grant was renewed October 
1, 1994 for $50,000 and is expected to be renewed in October 1995 for that 
same amount. In 1994, all department personnel were trained in the concepts 
and application of the community policing philosophy, a Citizens Advisory 
Committee was established, the community was divided into five areas and 21 
neighborhoods. Officers were assigned as liaisons to individual neighborhoods 
and were given problem solving assignments which allowed them to be productive 
while establishing personal contacts in their neighborhoods. The 
implementation of community policing has required significant changes in the 
way we think and in the way we perform our duties. This process is still 
ongoing and will be for several years. 

In 1995, the Department will continue to expand our proactive involvement in 
each of the neighborhoods. The Department will be conducting a Citizens 
Police Academy where residents will be provided insight into how the Police 
Department operates. 

Department policy and procedures in areas of interest such as use of force, 
motor vehicle pursuits, citizen complaints and the elements of crimes which 
must exist before an arrest or prosecution is made will be discussed. The 
Department is also considering conducting a one day Public Safety Town Meeting 
where residents would be provided information regarding the Police 
Department's goals and objectives and to provide information regarding policy 
and procedures for subjects of interest. As part of our planning for the 
future, the Police Department, working closely with the Citizens Advisory 
Committee, will review the role of the professional police officer in today's 
society; a review of the types of incidents which require a priority response 
and those which should be referred to the neighborhood officer; and how the 
available resources of the Department can be more effectively used to address 
the future problems of the community. 

The following is a departmental roster of the neighborhood officers and their 
assignments. 

Wilmington Police Department 
Community Policing 
Neighborhood Assignments 

Supervisor Area 1 Sergeant James Rooney 

lA. Officer James White IB. Officer David Bradbury 

IC. Officer Paul Chalifour ID. Officer Charles Fiore 



-27- 



Supervisor Area 2 Sergeant J. Christopher Neville 



2A. Officer Robert Richter 2B. Officer David Axelrod 

2C. Officer Harold Hubby 2D. Officer Francis Hancock 

2E. Officer Joseph Waterhouse 

Supervisor Area 3 Sergeant David NcCue 

3A. Officer Joseph Desmond 3B. Officer Stephen Mauriello 

30. Officer Chester Bruce, III 3D. Officer Thomas McConologue 

Supervisor Area 4 Sergeant Joseph Duffy 

4A. Officer Paul Jepson 4B. Officer Brian Tully 

4C. Officer Louis Martignetti 4D. Officer John Bossi 

Supervisor Area 5 Sergeant William Gable 

5A. Officer David Sugrue 5B. Officer Steven LaRivee 

5C. Officer Lawrence Redding 5D. Officer Jon Shepard 

BuainBBB and Coamercial Areaa 

Sergeant: W. Mark Jepson 

Area 1: Det. Thomas Miller Area 2: Det . Michael McKenna 

Area 3: Det. Patrick King Area 4: Det. Michael Celata 

Area 5: Det. Michael Begonis 



The department makes note of personnel changes during 1994. Patrolman Thomas 
McConologue and Patrolman David Bradbury were appointed as full time officers. 

In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all Boards and Committees and all Department Heads and their 
workers for their support and cooperation during 1994. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. 




Left to right: Assistant Town Manager Jeffrey Hull. Officer Charles Fiore. Officer Chip Bruce. Det. Michael Celata and 
Town Manager Michael Cairo after presentation of "Safe Driver " awards. 



-28- 



Wilmington Police Department Statietics 1994 



ARRESTS ; 



Arson 1 

Seat Belt 292 

Assault £ Battery 22 

Using Without Authority 1 

Breaking & Entering 14 

License Violations 197 

Disorderly Conduct 3 

Endangering 7 

Gambling 

Leave Scene of Property 5 
Damage 

Larceny 12 

Oj)erating Under Influence 44 

Larceny Motor Vehicle 7 

Unregistered/Uninsured 86 

Liquor Laws 150 

Speed 1,568 

Malicious Damage 

Narcotics 49 

Non/Support 

Rape 3 

Receiving Stolen Property 

Robbery 

Runaway 

Warnings 1,276 

Sex Offenses 1 

Complaints 95 

Juvenile 15 

Other 192 

TOTAL: 4,040 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY ; 
Ages; 

11/12 

13/14 2 

15 4 

16 6 

17 Jl 
TOTAL UNDER 18: 19 

18 12 

19 10 

20 4 

21 1 

22 9 

23 4 

24 6 
25/29 27 
30/24 19 
35/39 14 
40/44 8 
45/49 11 
50/54 1 
55/59 
60 & OVER _3 

TOTAL OVER 18: 129 



MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS ; 



Using Without Authority 1 

License Violations 197 

Endangering 7 

Leave Scene Property Damage 5 

Operating Under Influence 44 

Unregistered/Uninsured 86 

Speed 1,568 

Truck Violations 59 

Other 1.232 

TOTAL VIOLATIONS: 3,199 

CITATIONS ISSUED ; 

Warnings 1,276 

Complaints 95 

Non-Criminal 955 

Arrests 98 

TOTAL CITATIONS: 2,424 

CRIMES REPORTED ; 

Arson & Bombing (threats) 42 

Assault & Battery 15 

Firearm 1 

Knife 2 

Other Weapon 25 

Aggravated-Hands, etc. 44 

Simple Assault 17 

TOTAL ASSAULTS: 146 

BREAKING & ENTERING : 

By Force 55 

No Force 18 

Attempted B&E 28 

TOTAL BREAKING & ENTERING: 101 

ROBBERY : 

Firearm 

Other Weapon 1 

Strong Arm 1 

TOTAL ROBBERIES: 2 
SEX CRIMES : 

Rape 6 

Indecent Exposure 3 

Indecent A&B 1 

Other _7 

TOTAL SEX CRIMES; 17 



TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY; 148 



-29- 



LARCENIES ; 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN ; 



Pocket Picking 

Purse Snatching 2 

Shoplifting 15 

From Motor Vehicles 69 

M/V Parts & Accessories 22 

Bikes 20 

From Buildings 46 

From Coin Machines 3 

Larceny by check (fraud) 42 

Other _97 

TOTAL LARCENIES; 316 

INCIDENTS REPORTED ; 

Alarms Responded to 1,460 

Disturbances 2,689 

Domestic Problems 211 

Emergencies Responded to 379 

Fires Responded to 63 

Juvenile Complaints 368 

Missing Persons Returned 20 

Missing Persons/Still Missing 1 

Prowlers Reported 59 

Miscellaneous Complaints 3,125 

M/V Accidents 646 

Cruisers Dispatched 7,906 

Suicides & Attempts 5 

Sudden Deaths 11 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS ; 

Restraining Orders Served 136 

Parking Tickets Issued 119 

Firearm I.D. Issued 123 

License to Carry Issued 261 

Dealer Permits Issued 2 
Reports to Ins. Co. and 

Attorneys 535 



Autos 33 

Trucks & Buses 5 

Other Vehicles 3 

TOTAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT: 41 

RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES ; 

Stolen Wilmington 

Recovered Wilmington 9 
Stolen Wilmington 

Recovered Out of Town 24 
Stolen Out of Town 

Recovered Wilmington 30 

TOTAL RECOVERIES; 63 



Animal Control Officer 



Number of Dogs Licensed 1,358 

Number of Barn Inspections 42 

Amount of Fines Issued 380 

Number of Complaints 1,327 

Number of Trips 1,328 

Number of Trip Hours 968 

Number of Animals Picked Up 151 

Number of Animals Adopted 41 

Number of Animals Returned to Owner 97 

Number of Animals Picked Up Dead 82 

Number of Animals Euthanized 13 
(this number reflects sick or 
injured wildlife also) 

Number of Animals Quarantined 31 

Number of Dog Days in Pound 434 

Reimbursement from County $560 

Total Working Hours 2,248 



-30- 



Inspector of Buildings 









1992 






1993 






1994 




No^ 




Valuation 


No. 




Valuation 


No. 




Valuation 


Dwellings (Single Family) 


145 


$ 


23,069,000 


114 


$ 


18,869,900 


190 


$ 


33 


860,000 


Residential Garages 


19 




293,300 


15 




319,353 


12 






367 , 900 


Additions & Alterations 






















Residential 


291 




1.897.310 


313 




2.729.991 


325 




2 


397.145 


455 


$ 


25,259,610 


442 


$ 


21,919,244 


527 


$ 


36 


625 045 


Industrial Buildings 










1 




200,000 


2 








Commercial Buildings 


3 




1,714,500 

















Q 


Additions & Alterations 






















Non-residential 


86 




6,812,078 


74 




5,184,263 


61 




o 


, 512 ,455 


Swimming Pools 


27 




164, 399 


31 




113,031 


54 






248,769 


Signs 


22 




86,925 


21 




45, 680 


20 






68,700 


Public Buildings 




























Multi Family Dwellings 




























Sheds and Barns 


30 




55,114 


33 




42,335 


40 






48,759 


Wood Burning Stoves 


16 




13.435 


17 




16.929 


20 






16.705 


184 


$ 


8,846,451 


177 


$ 


5,602,238 


197 


$ 


s 


635 388 






s 


34, 106, 061 




$ 


27, 521,482 




$ 


45 


,260,433 


Renewals 


3 




70,000 


3 




150,000 


1 








Demolitions 


19 




577, 302 


18 




143,750 


25 






242 , 800 


Fire Damage 


















3 






34 000 


Foundations 


1 




1,000 










6 






199 , 700 


Temporary Trailers 


















3 






10 , 000 


23 


$ 


648, 302 


21 


$ 


293, 750 


38 


s 




546,500 


TOTAL 


662 


$ 


34, 754, 363 


640 


$ 


27,815,232 


762 


$ 


45 


,806,933 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND 




















TURNED OVER TO TREASURER 






















Building Permits 


662 


$ 


107,022.92 


640 


$ 


87,075.75 


762 


$137 


,493.00 


Wiring Permits 


559 




31,295.00 


525 




28,760.00 


638 




34 


,075.00 


Gas Permits 


189 




5,872.00 


162 




5,915.00 


240 




7 


,729.00 


Plumbing Permits 


292 




11,021.00 


254 




10,238.00 


335 




12 


,584.00 


Cert, of Inspection 


27 




1,085.00 


26 




1,275.00 


26 




1 


,218.00 


Copies 












132.07 








36.20 


Industrial Elec. Permits 


22 




3.300.00 


24 




3.600.00 


25 




3 


.750.00 



1,750 $ 159,595.92 1,631 $ 136,863.75 2,001 $193,135.20 



-31- 



Planning & Conservation Department 



1994 was the third year of operation for the consolidated Planning & 
Conservation Department. The department has continued to provide a high level 
of service to the community in areas of planning, conservation and other 
community development activities such as housing and transportation. Both 
Planning and Conservation have continued to witness significant development 
activity for the third continuous year. 



Departmental goals are: 

Goal 1: To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board through review 
of development plans, including coordination with developers and 
other departments; and through providing information on state 
planning initiatives and requirements. 

Goal 2: To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 

administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act. 



Goal 3: To provide assistance and information to residents. 

Goal 4: To revise the zoning bylaws to enhance the character of the town, 
while encouraging appropriate economic development. 

Goal 5: To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development. 

Goal 6: To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

Goal 7: To develop local wetland protection bylaws. 

Goal 8: To promote environmental awareness and education. 

Goal 9: To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership through 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, 
including town-owned land development, monitoring of on-going 
developments and review of local initiative projects sponsored by 
developers . 

Goal 10: To implement special planning/community development projects, 
including development and oversight of grant programs. 

Goal 11: To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various 
state and regional forums. 

The Planning & Conservation Department is responsible for oversight of other 
town projects and activities, including the Massachusetts Small Cities Program 
and disposition of town-owned land. The Director is also designated as the 
representative to the Transportation Improvement Project (TIP), Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC), 
acting as liaison between the town and the state regarding Wilmington 
transportation and planning issues. 



The Planning Sc Conservation Director is Lynn Goonin Duncan, Anne Gagnon 
serves as Environmental Specialist and provides technical assistance to the 
Conservation Commission. Secretarial support is provided by Senior Clerk 
Linda Simoneau and part-time Conservation Secretary Joann Roberto who joined 
the department in September 1994. 



Special Projects 

During 1994 the Town Center Committee continued its work on town center 
revitalization and improvement of the Route 38 Corridor which began in 1992. 
A significant package of zoning revisions was adopted at the 1994 Annual Town 
meeting. The basic concept of the rezoning is to allow businesses and 
property owners more flexibility, while providing for greater control by the 
town. Specifically, the changes included: 



-32- 



o Use, dimensional and parking regulations that will encourage the 

creation of a more traditional town center. For example, allowable 
uses now include restaurants, as well as retail and office. 

o Uses were reorganized in the General Business district to allow 
restaurants, hotels/motels, auto service stations and vehicular 
dealerships by special permit. This approach replaced the High 
Density Business district. 

o The third article rezoned a General Industrial area on Route 38 to 
General Business to minimize the number of non-conforming uses. 

The zoning changes are only one facet of a larger strategy for town center 
improvement. The Town Center Committee will continue its efforts through the 
newly established Economic Development Commission. 

SMALL CITIES PROGRAM 

The Small Cities Program was completed in December 1994. The program was 
funded through the State Executive Office of Communities and Development with 
federal funds. The $600,675 grant program was a significant asset to the Town 
and benefitted many Wilmington residents during its two years of operation. 
Key achievements of the program were: 

o Housing Rehabilitation: 31 homes predominantly in the Silver Lake 
area were rehabilitated, bringing homes up to building and 
sanitation code standards and improving the quality of life for many 
Wilmington households. This accomplishment exceeded the original 
program goal of improving 28 homes. 

o Employment Assistance: 190 unemployed residents benefitted from the 
various services offered by this component. Among the types of 
assistance available were weekly employment seminars with a variety 
of helpful guest speakers; individual job counseling; 
creation of a Job Resource Center at the public library as a job 
search facility for the participants; outreach to hundreds of area 
employers, in part to obtain current employment listings; and 
related forms of help. The component also offered two important 
forms of direct grant assistance - employment training grants and 
both group and individual mental health support through Wilmington 
Family Counseling Services. Twenty-six persons identified new 
career paths and received training grants and twenty-two individuals 
participated in the counseling sessions. The program exceeded its 
original goal to assist 120 residents by almost 60%. 

o First-time Homebuyer Assistance: This component assisted seven 

Wilmington families to purchase their first home in Wilmington by 
providing financial assistance toward the downpayment and closing 
costs. 

Planning Board 

New development activity continued at a significant level. Twelve subdivision 
plans were submitted representing a total of 118 lots. Although this level of 
subdivision activity is less than 1993 when 25 subdivision plans were filed 
representing 170 lots, the number of "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans 
increased to 52 in comparison with 29 the prior year. The level of 
commercial/industrial development activity was also greater than the previous 
year as indicated by the significant number of site plan review applications. 

Filing fees collected were $18,530.80 which were turned over to the General 
Fund. 

A number of large subdivisions were under construction, including Stonehedge 
Estates, Whitefield Elm Village, Andover Heights, Apache Way, Mill Pond 
Estates and Flynn Village. 

Streets accepted at the 1994 Annual Town Meeting were Earles Row, Gatehouse 
Lane, Allenhurst Way and Oxbow Drive. 



-33- 



The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five year 
terms. Planning Board members serving throughout 1994 were Richard Longo, 
Carole Hamilton, Austin Rounds and James Diorio. Michael Roache was appointed 
in May to serve on the board when William Hooper, Jr. declined reappointment 
after serving for 26 years. The town appreciates his dedication, time and 
energy over the years. In addition to serving as a volunteer planning 
coordinator during Lynn Duncan's maternity leave, he continues to assist the 
department with various planning activities. 

Planning Board members are active as board representatives. Austin Rounds 
serves as the representative to the Board of Appeals; Richard Longo and Austin 
Rounds serve as representatives to the School Building Subcommittee; and 
Carole Hamilton and Richard Longo served on the Town Center Committee (now the 
Economic Development Commission). 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed and took action on the 
following subdivision plans: 





Number 






Subdivision 


of Lots 


Action 


Blanchard Road 


2 


Approved with 


conditions 


Stonehedge Estates 


30 


Approved with 


conditions 


Wakefield Avenue 


2 


Approved with 


conditions 


Cushing 


2 


Approved with 


conditions 


Auburn Avenue 


1 


Approved with 


conditions 


Avon Street Extension 


3 


Approved with 


conditions 


Agostino Drive 


14 


Approved with 


conditions 


Reading Avenue 


1 


Approved with 


conditions 


Marion Street III (Miller Pond 


12 


Approved with 


conditions 


Estates ) 




(Appealed) 




Faulkner Avenue 


1 


Approved with 


conditions 


Oakridge Terrace Preliminary 


5 


Denied 




Park Avenue 


1 


Approved with 


conditions 


Somerset Estates Preliminary 


13 


Approved with 


conditions 


Indian Road 


5 


Pending 




Presidential Drive Extension 








Preliminary 


8 


Approved with 


conditions 


White Pines Crossing 


36 


Pending 




Marion Estates 


19 


Withdrawn 




Tanner Road and Greenville Street 


3 


Pending 





Of the fifty-two (52) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans that were submitted, 
the Planning Board determined that forty-six (46) plans did not recjuire 
approval under the Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed; two (2) plans 
were denied; one (1) was withdrawn; no action was taken on two (2) plans and 
one (1) is pending. 



Site Plan Review 

The Board reviewed sixteen (16) applications for Site Plan Approval for 
commercial and industrial property and recommended revisions and conditions to 
the Town Engineer as appropriate. This is a significant increase of 400% in 
comparison with 1993 when only four plans were reviewed. 

Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings 
beginning on page 107. 



-34- 



CONSBRVATTOli COMMISSION 



The Conservation Commission reviewed 111 new applications as well as numerous 
other permit requests. Over 200 public hearings/meetings were held to review 
these projects. While this was a slight increase over 1993, both 1993 and 
1994 statistics were nearly double previous years. 

The Commission submitted a warrant article for the Annual Town Meeting 
proposing a wetland bylaw to further protect wetlands in town. While the 
bylaw did not pass, it did increase understanding and develop support for the 
protection of wetlands. The process was educational with many public meetings 
held to discuss the importance of wetlands and the current state regulations, 
as well as the proposed bylaw. 

The First Annual Wilmington Watershed Cleanup held in September was extremely 
successful. The cleanup was a partnership of private citizens, town 
departments and local developers resulting in the removal of many truckloads 
of debris from local streams and wetlands. While the cleanup focused on two 
parcels behind Town Hall and Silver Lake, many other sites throughout town 
were cleaned as well. The Commission also hosted a workshop entitled 
"Preventing Polluted Runoff from New Development" and gave lectures on 
wetlands to both the League of Women Voters and the local Grange. The 
Commission developed a number of policies in 1994 to clarify filing and review 
procedures . 

One 2.5 acre parcel of town-owned land was transferred to the care, custody, 
management and control of the Conservation Commission at the Annual Town 
Meeting. The parcel consisted almost entirely of wetlands and is located 
along the railroad tracks and Lubbers Brook behind North Street. In addition, 
the Commission acquired 5.5 acres donated by Mrs. Amelia Booth, Peter 
DeGennaro, John Bennevento and Robert Scarano. These donations were initiated 
in 1993. 

Conservation Commission members are appointed by the Town Manager. Commission 
members in 1994 included Chairperson Lynne Guzinski, James Morris, Gary 
Mercer, William Gately, John White, Jr. and Barbara Sullivan. William 
MacKinnon left the Commission after five years of dedicated service. 

Questions on wetlands and filing procedures are welcomed by Anne Gagnon, 
Environmental Specialist. 

Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected $13,830.00 

Notices of Intent Filed 36 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 75 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held 

(including continuances) 206 

Extension Permits Requested/Issued/Denied 8/7/1 

Enforcement Orders Issued 3 

Violation Notices Issues 27 

Complaints Investigated 45 

Certificates of Compliance Requested/Issued 41/30 

Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 9/3 

Orders of Conditions/Determinations Pending 3/3 

Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Withdrawn 37/6/6 

Site Inspections Conducted (Staff) 529 

Emergency Certifications Issued 3 

By-law Subcommittee Meetings Held 7 

Request for Insignificant Change/ Approved 21/4 
Negative Determinations with Conditions/Positive/ 

Withdrawn 62/6/3 

Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied 7/6/1 



-36- 



NoticeB of Intent 



DEP 



FILE f 


APPLICANT 


344 


-452 


ThoiHAS Redlty 






Trust 


344 


-456 


Wilmington Water 






and Sewer Dept . 


344 


-454 


Doherty-Lopez 


344 


-453 


Doherty-Lopez 


344 


-455 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp . 




—457 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp. 


344 


-458 


Northeastern Dev. 


344 


-31 1 


Joseph Brown 


J'*'* 




Carl Crupi & Sons 


344 


-460 


Gary Ruping 


344 


-462 


Mary Nelson 


344 


-461 


Laura Miller 


344 


-464 


Universe 






Construction 


344 


-463 


Mark Lopez 


344 


-466 


Carl Crupi & Sons 


344 


-468 


James Tighe 


344 


-465 


Gloria Szabo 


344 


-467 


Glenn & Teresa 






Sullivan 


344 


-472 


Universe 






Construction 


344 


-469 


Keith James Realty 






Trust 


344 


-471 


Byron & Michele 






Kincaid 


344 


-485 


Edward White 


344 


-474 


Carl Crupi 


344 


-473 


Carl Crupi 


344 


-470 


Universe 






Construction 


344- 


-480 


E. Bruce Belanson 


344- 


-479 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp. 


344 


-478 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp. 


344- 


-477 


Steve D'Urso 


344- 


-476 


Mike TkachuK 


344- 


-475 


Shawsheen River 






Associates 


344- 


-484 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp. 


344- 


-482 


Northeastern Dev. 






Corp. 


344- 


-481 


Sacco Realty Trust 


344- 


-483 


Olin Corp. 


344- 


-486 


Wilmington DPW 



LOCATION (MAP/PARCELS 

Buckinghoun Estates (9/67, 10/8, 
11, 12, 14-17, 24 & 26) 

9 Sewall Road (93/15) 
Lot 18 Stonehedge Drive (107/18) 
Lot 13 Stonehedge Drive (107/13) 
Agostino Drive (53/5A & 5C) 



DECISION 



Order Issued 

Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 
Order Issued 



Lot 6 King Street (53/Part of 5B) Order Issued 

Lot 11 Agostino Drive (53/Part 
of 5B) 

19 Cedar Street (30/67) 
Lot 6C Shawsheen Avenue (23/ 

Part of 6) 
Lot 11 Fernbanks Road (15/11) 

Mather and Walnut Streets (Map 6) 

Lot A Marion Street (5/Part of 3) 
Marion Street - Miller Pond 

Estates (5/2) 
Lot 2, 83 Butters Row (15/29C) 



Glen Road (66/52B) 
Reading Avenue (55/49) 
17 Roosevelt Road (7/42) 

22 Chapman Avenue (94/117) 
Stonehedge Drive Lot 12 
(18/18 & Part of 18F) 

Faulkner Avenue (69/58) 

Lynch Lane Lot 2 (67/Part of 52C) 
Lake Street (34/158F) 



Castle Drive (107/19,20 & 21) 
Lot 2 Middlesex Avenue (42/60A) 
Lot 3 Chestnut Street (14/Part 
of 5) 

Lot 2 Chestnut Street (14/Part 
of 5) 

Lots D & E Woburn Street (58/19A) 
42 Hanover Street (51/66) 

Shawsheen Commons (106/79-230) 
Everett Avenue/Broad Street (54/7A; 

68/1) Pending 



Broad Street (68/1) Pending 

Lot 10 Agostino Drive (53/Part Order Denied 

of 5B) (Appealed) 
51 Eames Street (37/10) Order Issued 
19 & 21 Roosevelt Rd. (7/41B & 42B) Pending 



Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Denied 


(Appealed) 


Order 


Denied 


(Appealed) 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Denied 


Order 


Denied 


(Appealed) 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


) Order 


Issued 


) Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 


(Appealed) 


Order 


Issued 


(Appealed) 


Order 


Denied 


Order 


Issued 


Order 


Issued 



-37- 



Determinations of Applicability Recrueated 



APPLICANT 
Mark Lopez 

Mass. Highway 

Dept. 
Clyde & Susan 

McCarthy 
Wilmington 

Garden Club 
Jane Cosman 

Cyrus 
James Tighe 
I. Fred DiCenso 

Trust 
Kevin Keating 
Lisa Marie 

Conti 
Steve Shepardson 
David & Brenda 

Cullinane 
Mark Lewis 
Gloria Szabo 
Zeneca Resins 
Cheryl & Peter 

Barry 
Robert Fugucia 
Jaccjueline 

Bazzinotti 
Donald & 

Marguerite 

Tucker 
Mark Lopez 
Paul & Denise 

Savoia 
Wetlands 

Preservation, 

Inc. 
Jeff Miller 
Frank Carew 

Joe & Pat 

Valentino 
Sally M. Lojek 
Gerald Sullivan 
Jeffrey Miller 

Carl Crupi 
Willioun Loring 
Mary O'Rourke 
James McGonagle 
Unai Garabieta 
Joseph Langone 
Don Belcher 
Wilmington DPW 
Carolyn Wood 
Jean & David 

Labrecque 
Wilmington DPW 

Michael 

Butterworth 
Four L. Realty 

Trust 
Willicun Lynch, 

Jr. 



LOCATION 

Castle Drive (5 lots) 

Route 125 & Ballardvale 

Street 
14 Ferguson Road 

Lake Street 

49 Marion Street 

Reading Avenue 
One Progress Way 

2 Lynch Lane 

644 Woburn Street 

31 Burlington Avenue 
Lot 3, 5 Avon Street 

3 Faulkner Avenue 
17 Roosevelt Road 
730 Main Street 
21 Towpath Drive 

16R Hillside Way 
12 Freeport Drive 

35 Shady Lane Drive 



21 Dadant Drive 

322 Burlington Avenue 

Sarafina'B Way 



Mackey Road 

Lot 6B - 482 Shawsheen 

Avenue 
31 Adams Street 

49 Grace Drive 
Brattle Street 
820 Woburn Street 

48 Glen Road 

18 Kenwood Avenue 

15 Birchwood Road 

6 Freeport Drive Lot 32 

R31 Boutwell Street 

Harden Street 

20 Pinewood Road 

Bridge Lane 

18 Mystic Avenue 

68 Marion Street 

Intersection of Concord 

Street & Woburn Street 
48 Clark Street 

214 Andover Street 

One Lawrence Street 



MAP /PARCEL 

107/22, 23, 24, 
25 & 30 



33/5B 

34/72 

5/lC 

55/49 
56/llOA 

67/38 
58/19B 

30/9A 
9/35A 

55/118 
7/42B 
39/8 
28/25 

2/7D 
100/629 

80/33 



78/15A 
6/87B 

10/3 & 5A 



62/45 & 47 
23/Part of 6 

51/44 

36/162 

54/14 

47/3 

66/52B 

59/23 

81/11 

100/632 

19/36 

20/26 

81/58 

32/15B 

78/1 

5/lA 

77/85 & 86 
43/42 
Rl/14 
66/61 



DETERMINATION 
ISSUED 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Positive 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 

Negative 
Positive 
Negative 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 

Negative 



Negative 
Negative 

Positive 



Negative 
Negative 

Negative 

Negative 
Negative 
Negative 

Withdrawn 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 



-38- 



Determinations of Applicability Requested 
APPLICANT LOCATION 



Sean Kelley 
Sean Conway 
Earl Hupper 
Louis Cherubino 
Charles Moretti 
Angela Gatta 
Analog Devices 
Eric Porter 
Mark Lopez 

Charles & Cathy 

Tynan 
Joseph Yentile 
John Butt 
Michael Michaud 
Earl Hupper 
Earl Hupper 
John Forrest 
Glenn Weymouth 
Joseph Langone 

James Morris 
Christopher 
Eckelkamp 
Joann Roberto 
Mary Nelson 



Jeffrey Miller 
Mike Tkachuk 
Zeneca Resins 
Colonial Gas 

Company 
Colonial Gas 

Company 
Olin Corp. 



01 in Corp. 



Universe 

Construction 
Amtrack R.R. 
Olin Corp. 



25 Towpath Drive 
30 Cary Street 
Woburn Street 
11 Avery Street 
65 Forest Street 
911 Main Street 
804 Woburn Street 
17 Bridge Lane 
Castle Drive Lot 11 

64 Forest Street 

9 Cross Street 
25 Fox Run Drive Lot 
9 Quail Run 
Woburn Street Lot 1 
Woburn Street Lot 2 
280 Lowell Street 
59 Glen Road 
Baker Street 

404 Salem Street 
14 Cambridge Avenue 

109 Woburn Street 
Walnut Street 



820 Woburn Street 
42 Hanover Street 
730 Main Street 
Church Street 

Middlesex Avenue 

Butters Row, Main Street, 
Factory Street 



Main Street, Butters Row, 
Woburn Street, New Boston 
Street 



Mystic Avenue 

Town-wide right-of-way 
51 Eames Street 



MAP /PARCEL 

29/39 

67/12 

58/19A 

9/43 

7/lOOD 

25/4 

47/2 

32/125 

18/18 & Part of 

18F 
7/3 

39/5 

96/107 

75/104 

58/Part of 19A 
58/Part of 19A 
72/lA & IB 
67/52B 
45/4A & 4E 

103/18 
9/64C 

95/17C 
Map 6 



47/3 
51/66 
39/8 
41 & 42 

79 

14/6;24/120; 
25/2;26/2 & 9; 
27/4A,5A,llB, 
11D,11E,11G,13, 
17;37/1;39/9,10, 
11 &11 A 
14/6;24/120; 
25/2;26/2 & 9; 
27/4A,5A,llB, 
11D,11E,11G,13, 
17;37/1;39/9,10, 
11 fill A 
78/lA & 65/22A 
& 22d 

37/10 



DETERMINATION 
ISSUED 



Negative 

Negative 

Withdrawn 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Positive 

Withdrawn 

Negative 

Negative 

Positive 

(Appealed) 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

No Action 

Taken 

(Appealed) 

Negative 

Positive 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 



Negative 



Pending 

Pending 
Pending 



-39- 



Housing Partnership 



The Housing Partnership continued its efforts to develop affordable housing on 
town-owned land during 1994. A significant accomplishment was the sale of the 
first affordable home to be built on town-owned land to a Wilmington resident. 
The home was developed by L.A. Associates, Inc. in coordination with the 
Housing Partnership. It is a single family, split gambrel cape on a 30,000 
square foot lot consistent in character with the neighborhood. The appraised 
value was determined to be $187,000, although the home was sold at the 
affordable price of $94,500.00. A deed restriction ensures that the sales 
price will remain affordable for Wilmington families in the future. It is 
worth noting the effort and time that goes into such a town-initiated 
development as the process took over two years, including town meeting 
approval, neighborhood meetings, solicitation and review of developer 
proposals, permitting, marketing, lottery selection process and construction. 
Other sites on Denault Drive and Avon Street Extension are in varying stages 
of the development process. Four affordable single family homes are proposed 
on these sites. 

Eight parcels of town-owned land on Bailey Road, Edgeworth/Second Avenue, and 
Lee Street were approved for disposition for the purpose of affordable housing 
at the 1994 Annual Town meeting. A total of five single family homes are 
proposed. Additional site analysis will be conducted prior to soliciting 
further neighborhood input and development proposals. 

The Partnership also continued to monitor progress of on-going affordable 
housing developments, including Buckingham Estates and Shawsheen Commons. As 
of December 1994 three affordable homes were sold in Buckingham Estates, as 
well as four market rate homes. Shawsheen Commons held its lottery for the 
fourth of five phases. 

Housing Partnership members throughout 1994 included Charles Boyle, Robert 
Cain, Rocco DePascpjale, Carole Hamilton, Mark Haldane, Gregory Erickson, 
Charles Fiore, Jr., Raymond Forest, Bruce MacDonald, James Russo and Lester 
White. Dr. James Ficociello and Reverend Thomas F. Dean were appointed by the 
Town Manager as new members. Rev. Michael Stotts resigned from the 
Partnership as he was relocating from town. The Partnership will miss his 
leadership and dedication. The Partnership meets the second Thursday of each 
month and welcomes interested residents to attend the meetings. 




First affordable home consirucled on Town-owned land through a public-private partnership between the Wilmington 
Housing Partnership and L.A. A.K.uK iates. Inc. of Wilmington. 



-40- 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 

Adams Street from 

Adelaide Street from 

Agoatino Drive from 

Aldrich Road from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allenhurst Way from 

Allen Park Drive from 

Andover Street from 

Andover Street from 

Andrew Street from 

Anthony Avenue from 

Apollo Drive from 

Appletree Lane from 

Arlene Avenue from 

Auburn Avenue from 

Ayotte Street from 

Baker Street from 

Baland Road from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Bancroft Street from 

Barbara Avenue from 

Beacon Street from 

Beech Street from 

Beeching Avenue from 

Belmont Avenue from 

Benson Road from 

Biggar Avenue from 

Birchwood Road from 

Birchwood Road from 

Blanchard Road from 

Boutwell Street from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brattle Street from 

Brentwood Avenue from 

Bridge Lane from 

Bridge Lane from 

Broad Street from 

Burlington Avenue from 

Burnap Street from 

Burnap Street from 

Burt Road from 

Butters Row from 

Buzzell Drive from 

Canal Street from 

Carolyn Road from 

Carson Avenue from 

Carter Lane from 

Catherine Avenue from 

Cedar Street from 

Cedar Crest Road from 

Central Street from 

Chandler Road from 



LOCATION 

Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Gandalf Way 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 
Salem Street 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 
Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 
Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 
Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 
Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 
Salem Street to Ella Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 

Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 

Ballardvale Street 

Salem Street to Route 125 

Route 12 5 to Andover Line 

Liberty Street 

Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 
Church Street to Belmont Avenue 
Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 
Cunningham Street to Faulkner Ave. 
Columbia Street to State Street 
Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 
Salem Street to Ring Avenue 
Shady Lane Drive 
Judith Road 
Kendall Road 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 

Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 
Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 
Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 
King Street 

Main Street to Burlington Line 
Grove Avenue 
Winchell Road 

Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 
Main Street to Chestnut Street 
Draper Drive to Evans Drive 

Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 
North Street to Marcia Road 
Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Norfolk Ave 
Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Burt Road to Harris Street 
Pinewood Road to Judith Road 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Adams Street to Kelley Road 



LENGTH 


DATE( 


S) ACCEPTED 


2,915 


1908 




666 


1976 




999 


1979 




6,740 


1894 




470 


1993 




1,161 


1994 




2,319 


1971 


1984 


180 


1894 




11,300 


1894 


1970 


435 


1985 




300 


1966 




300 


1971 




994 


1990 




3,754 


1966 


1978 


755 


1945 




240 


1947 




684 


1945 




540 


1972 




965 


1894 




12,000 


1894 


1985 


400 


1952 




850 


1966 




970 


1915 




1,005 


1947 




440 


1959 




980 


1933 




616 


1971 




1,282 


1975 




1,197 


1952 




400 


1953 




625 


1989 




4, 144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Kin 

O J.U 


1 Q "J T 




950 


1933 


1943 


1,066 


1945 




1,017 


1938 




455 


1894 




754 


1894 




1,377 


1954 




8,588 


1894 




1, 145 


1953 




484 


1945 




1,653 


1945 


1946 


3, 577 


1894 




600 


1971 




1,505 


1939 


1955 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


1,017 


1961 




1,411 


1957 




1,000 


1966 




687 


1945 




1,100 


1963 




552 


1950 




400 


1957 





-41- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


859 


1971 




Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 




Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 




Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 




Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


1969 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 




Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 




Columbia Street 


from 


Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1, 150 


1908 


1933 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 




Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 




Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 




Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 




Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 




Cornell Place 


from 


Fordham Road 


747 


1982 




Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 




Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 




Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 




Cunningham St. 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Ave 


2,447 


1944 


1952 1953 


Cushing Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


990 


1993 




Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 




Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1,760 


1964 




Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 




Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 




Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


1971 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 




Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 




Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 




Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 




Douglas Avenue 


from 


Palmer Way 


1,017 


1989 




Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1, 560 


1959 


1971 


Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 




Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 




Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 





Fames Street 
Earles Row 
Edward Road 
Ella Avenue 
El wood Road 
Emerson Street 
Englewood Drive 
Evans Drive 
Everett Avenue 



from Main Street to Woburn Street 3,200 1894 

from Route 62 820 1994 

from Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 450 1947 

from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 1,043 1978 

from Forest Street 642 1968 

from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 590 1951 

from Kenwood Drive 455 1971 

from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 2,071 1971 

from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham St. 480 1979 



Fairfield Road 
Fairmeadow Road 
Fairmont Avenue 
Fairview Avenue 
Faneuil Drive 

Faulkner Avenue 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Ferguson Road 
Flagstaff Road 
Fletcher Lane 
Floradale Avenue 
Fordham Road 



from Main Street 1,299 1946 

from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 2,328 1958 

from Molloy Road 952 1971 

from State Street 648 1933 
from Massachusetts Avenue 

to beyond Harvard Avenue 790 1950 

from Glen Road to Jacobs Street 1,946 1944 

from Glen Road to Garden Avenue 714 1938 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 5,740 1894 

from Shawsheen Avenue 1,073 1967 

from Nichols Street 587 1989 

from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 792 1977 

from Burlington Avenue 627 1970 

from North Reading Line 3,714 1971 



1953 
1945 



-42- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Forest Street 
Fox Run Drive 
Franklin Avenue 
Frederick Drive 
Freeport Drive 

Gandalf Way 
Gatehouse Lane 
Gearty Street 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gloria Way 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Avenue 
Grant Street 
Great Neck Drive 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Heunlin Lane 
Hanover Street 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
Henry L. Drive 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 
Houghton Road 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jewel Drive 
Jones Avenue 
Jonspin Road 
Judith Road 

Kajin Way 
Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Ext. 
Kirk Street 



from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
from High Street 

from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
from Salem Street 

from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 

from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 
from Towpath Road 
from Ring Avenue 

from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 

from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Broad Street 

from Park Street to Marcus Road 

from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 

from Corey Avenue 

from Federal Street 

from Woburn Street 

from Main Street to Lake Street 

from Reading Line 

from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 

from Lawrence Street 

from Atlantic Avenue 

from Woodland Road 

from Aldrich Road to Jacjuith Road 

from Main Street to Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 

from Main Street to River Street 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 

from Woburn Street 

from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 
from Woburn Street 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 
from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 
from Suncrest Avenue 

from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 
from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
from Kendall Street to Andrew Street 

from Woburn Street to West Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 
from Eeunes Street 
from Glen Road 
from Andover Street 

from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 

from Woburn Street 
from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 
from Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 
from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 
from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 
from Glen Road to Broad Street 
from Glen Road 
from Main Street 



4, 


100 


1894 




975 


1989 




739 


1978 


1, 


070 


1966 


2, 


086 


1979 




549 


1979 




380 


1994 




627 


1989 




870 


1894 


1, 


304 


1952 




365 


1959 




770 


1989 




941 


1956 


2 , 


514 


1966 




815 


1952 




780 


1943 




536 


1989 


4, 


147 


1910 




120 


1957 


1, 


506 


1959 




540 


1962 




574 


1988 




838 


1969 




428 


1951 




600 


1895 


1 , 


312 


1971 




806 


1945 




430 


1951 


3, 


270 


1951 




230 


1956 


1, 


286 


1979 




651 


1993 


3 , 


585 


1894 


2 , 


230 


1914 




364 


1959 


1 , 


560 


1945 


3, 


051 


1894 


1, 


702 


1985 


4, 


430 


1974 


1/ 


398 


1938 


1, 


248 


1968 


1 , 


303 


1985 




717 


1940 


3 , 


800 


1993 




400 


1953 




455 


1989 




923 


1957 


1, 


420 


1945 


1, 


725 


1970 




693 


1958 


1, 


840 


1894 


2, 


400 


1940 




487 


1979 




575 


1951 



1976 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1952 
1975 



1949 1951 



1971 



1945 



-43- 



STREET 


LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE( 


S) ACCEPTED 


Lake Street 


from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from Cunningham Street to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from Federal Street 


720 


1943 




T 1 nHa Poart 


from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1, 760 


1950 




Lloyd Road 


from Main Street 


1,050 


1951 




Lockwood Road 


from Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Lorin Drive 


from Swain Road 


560 


1992 




Loumac Road 


from Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1894 


1978 


Lowell St. Park 


from Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 1958 


Lucaya Circle 


from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 




Mackey Road 


from Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2,806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from Cowing Road 


2,315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from Burlington Avenue to beyond 










Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marjorie Road 


from Main Street 


1,392 


1951 




Massachusetts Ave. 


.from Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 




McDonald Road 


from Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 




Meadow Lane 


from Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




Melody Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




Middlesex Avenue 


from Main Street to Salem Street 


12 , 140 


1894 




Miles Street 


from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Miller Road 


from Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 










Wedgewood Avenue 


1,528 


1967 




Morgan Road 


from Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




Morningside Drive 


from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 




Morse Avenue 


from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 




Mystic Avenue 


from Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 


1908 


1988 


Nassau Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1 , 566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 




Nichols Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 




Nickerson Avenue 


from West Street 


953 


1947 




Norfolk Avenue 


from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 




North Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 




No. Washington 










Avenue 


from Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 




Nunn Road 


from Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Olson Street 


from Church Street 


122 


1957 




Oxbow Drive 


from Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 





-44- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Palmer Way 
Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patches Pond Lane 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilcher Drive 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineridge Road 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Pleasant Road 
Powder House 

Circle 
Presidential Dr. 
Progress Way 

Quail Run 



from Middlesex Avenue 

from Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 
from Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 
from Chestnut Street to a dead end 
from Dell Drive 
from Federal Street 

from Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 

from the end of Gearty Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 

from North St. to Linda Road 

from Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 

from Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 

from Middlesex Avenue 
from Boutwell Street 
from Industrial Way 

from Woburn Street 



1,437 
4,180 
2,000 
1,185 
595 
720 
1,519 
410 
954 
380 
914 
450 
1,364 
750 

710 
826 
630 



1989 
1895 
1919 
1990 
1958 
1943 
1946 
1989 
1959 
1945 
1960 
1953 
1954 
1962 

1954 
1977 
1974 



1954 1981 



500 1992 



Radcliff Road 
Railroad Avenue 
Reading Avenue 
Redwood Terrace 
Reed Street 
Research Drive 
Richmond Street 
Ridge Road 
Ring Avenue 
River Street 
Roberts Road 
Rollins Road 
Roosevelt Road 
Route 62 
Royal Street 



from South Street to Benson Road 
from Clark Street 
from Oakwood Road 
from Kenwood Avenue 

from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave, 

from Ballardvale Street 

from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 

from Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 

from Marion Street to Fenway Street 

from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 

from Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 

from Salem Street 



355 
650 
215 
645 

,090 
,817 
,800 

365 
,150 

453 
,861 

200 
,980 
,343 



1,043 



1971 
1909 
1979 
1970 
1971 
1989 
1973 
1956 
1975 
1962 
1967 
1954 
1946 
1958 
1951 



Salem Street 

Salem Street 

Scaltrito Drive 
School Street 
Senpek Road 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Sherburn Place 
Sheridan Road 
Sherwood Road 
Silver Lake Ave. 
Sparhawk Drive 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 



from Tewksbury Line to beyond 

Ballardvale Street 8,895 1894 
from North Reading Line to beyond 

Woburn Street 6,475 1894 

from Salem Street 785 1974 

from Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 1,139 1915 

from Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 280 1971 

from Hathaway Road 300 1955 

from Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 2,904 1950 
from beyond Richmond Street 

to Billerica Line 11,845 1894 

from Shawsheen Avenue 723 1975 

from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 1,021 1951 

from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 445 1971 

from Lake Street to Dexter Street 455 1954 

from Park Street to Heather Drive 361 1979 

from Shady Lane Drive 690 1952 

from Belmont Ave. to Fairview Ave. 315 1933 

from Lowell Street 908 1955 

from West Street to Ledgewood Road 1,246 1954 

from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 2,290 1922 



1958 



1971 



1929 



-45- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Tracy Circle 


from 


Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1, 105 


1954 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 1978 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 






Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5 , 290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1, 146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 1978 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



-46- 



Redevelopment Authority 



In 1994, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority completed the Conceptual Plan 
for roadway improvements for Route 38. During the year, the Authority 
presented the plan to the community and civic groups for review and comment, 
ending the process with a joint meeting with the Selectmen to approve the plan 
for submission to the Massachusetts Highway Department. 

The Massachusetts Highway Department approved the Conceptual Plan, and the 
Authority entered into a design contract with Fay, Spofford and Thorndike for 
the preparation of engineering drawings for the project. 

At the close of 1994, the Massachusetts Highway Department was engaged in the 
review of the twenty-five percent engineering plans for the project. 

In addition to current projects, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority has 
provided the Town of Wilmington with continuing benefits from its investment 
in the Jewel Drive Industrial Park for the past 20+ years. At the end of 
1994, there were 10 businesses operating in Jewel Park, employing a total of 
1,025 workers. Based upon Fiscal Year 1994 data provided by the Assessor's 
Office, the total assessed value of the Park was $13,813,300 and the annual 
tax revenue to the Town of Wilmington totalled $363,661. 

A reorganization of the Authority took place during the year. Vaughn R. 
Surprenant, who served on the Authority for over 13 years, submitted his 
resignation in the fall after being promoted by his company and relocating to 
the state of New York. John H. Creeth was appointed by the Board of Selectmen 
to fill the vacant position. 

The officers of the Authority are as follows: Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman; 
Charles N. Gilbert, Vice Chairman; Patricia F. Duggan, Treasurer; Sidney R. 
Kaizer, Assistant Treasurer; and John H. Creeth, Secretary. 



Cable TV. Advisory Task Force 

The task force was reactivated in October to serve on behalf of the Board of 
Selectmen in negotiations with Continental Cablevision over renewal of 
Continental's cable license. 

State and federal law governs much of the activities of cable operators. The 
authority to license a particular cable operator to provide cable service in a 
town is vested with the Board of Selectmen. These licenses are usually 
granted for a term of five to ten years. Wilmington currently has a ten year 
license which is due to expire on February 27, 1997. Usually the procurement 
of goods and services over a specific dollar value requires that the town 
initiate a bid process. In the case of cable services this bid process does 
not apply. Instead the town must negotiate the new license with the existing 
provider, Continental Cablevision. Unless the town is able to make a 
compelling argument in four specific areas that the cable provider has been 
deficient in the provision of cable services then the license must be renewed 
with the existing cable provider. 

The task force has been discussing the most effective approach for soliciting 
input from interested groups and the general public about their level of 
satisfaction with the existing cable service and the types of services which 
subscribers would like to see in the future. Federal statute limits the types 
of issues which the town may negotiate with the cable operator. Two issues 
which cannot be negotiated are the cost of cable services and the specific 
channel offerings and associated programs. In an effort to gather relevant 
information, it is anticipated that the task force may conduct some type of 
survey in 1995. A public hearing will also be scheduled to give residents an 
opportunity to voice their opinions about cable services. 

The task force will review the public input together with information gathered 
about such issues as current and future cable technology, educational needs 
within the Wilmington school system which could be addressed via cable and 



-47- 



municipal needs for cable. Those needs that appear to be of greatest 
importance and merit to the town will be brought to the negotiating table. 
Continental Cablevision and the task force will participate in negotiations to 
establish a new license agreement for the provision of cable services. Once 
such a tentative agreement is reached, which is in the town's best interests, 
the task force will meet with the Board of Selectmen with a recommendation to 
execute the license. The town is seeking to conclude the renewal process by 
the fall of 1996. 

The Cable T.V. Advisory Task Force has a great deal of work ahead of it and 
welcomes any comments which residents may have about cable service. 



Board of Health 



The Board of Health consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager 
for three year terms. Serving on the Board throughout 1994 were Chairman 
James Ficociello, D.D.S., One Fletcher Lane, Mr. Joseph Paglia, 101 Nichols 
Street, Mr. Milton Calder, Sr., 14 Hobson Avenue. The Director of Public 
Health is Gregory Erickson, R.S., C.H.O., and the Public Health Nurse is Ann 
FitzGerald, R.N. The Animal Control Officer is Ellen Davis. The secretarial 
staff (which is shared with the Inspector of Buildings and Board of Appeals) 
consists of Joan Goulet and Toni LaRivee. In addition, Michael Saraco, R.S., 
and Pamela Ross-Kung, R.S., Cathy Bazylinski, R.S., and Karen Springer, 
C.E.H.T., were contracted as needed to conduct a portion of the field 
inspections on a part-time basis. 

Field inspections include restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and in the schools, mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks, 
the Fourth of July activities, caterers, the Farm Stand at the Aleppo Temple 
and other temporary food stands, percolation tests, subsurface sewage disposal 
permits and inspections, nuisance complaints, noise pollution, hazardous waste 
spills, leaking underground storage tanks, safe and sanitary housing 
inspections, lead paint determinations and inspections, smoking and tobacco 
law enforcement, lake and beach water C5piality, and other miscellaneous 
inspections. 

The administrative duties of the office include the licensing and the 
enforcement of many of the above items, including issuing orders, issuing 
citations, holding hearings, attending meetings and court actions. Other 
administrative duties include the creation of health or risk prevention 
programs, and distributing information on various health issues. 

The Board of Health has been awarded a grant of $22,064 by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the continuation of a Tobacco Control Program. 
This program employs a part-time Director and clerk and has as its goal the 
reduction of tobacco use in the Town of Wilmington by 50% by the year 1999. 

Our radon detection and survey program continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public as a result of a two year contract with NITON of Bedford, 
wherein residents of the Town of Wilmington can purchase radon detection test 
kits (2 tests per kit) for $16.00 at the office of the Board of Health and 
receive important information for the reduction of radon and the associated 
risk of lung cancer. 



-48- 



A rabies clinic was held 
during Rabies Awareness 
Week in May at the 4th of 
July Building on 
Middlesex Avenue. 

The Director served in an 
advisory capacity on the 
Title 5 Advisory 
Committee and co-chaired 
the Technical Review 
Committee for the 
Department of 
Environmental Protection. 
He was instrumental in 
preventing some sweeping 
changes which would have 
been very costly to 
homeowners in the Town of 
Wilmington, and promoted 
a common-sense approach 
to sewage disposal 
upgrades as part of the 
implementation of the new 
Title 5 Regulations which 
become effective March 
31, 1995. 




Each year the town conducts a Rabies Clinic at the 4th of July Building. For the 
second year. Wilmington opened the clinic to cats as well as dogs. 



The Public Health Nurse 
participated in seven 
health fairs and events 
during 1994. Wilmington 

Pediatrics, Winchester Hospital and the Board of Health have begun a joint 
program providing four free physicals a month, free immunization and health 
care information for uninsured children. This prograim resulted from a 
community round-table discussion where these needs were identified. A 
Resource Center, where Wilmington residents can go for social, health and job- 
related information, is being organized under the auspices of Winchester 
Hospital. Many service groups, as well as the Town of Wilmington are working 
towards its completion. 



Four Workshops for Breast Self-Exaun were conducted for completion of the 
Breast Health Awareness Project with Lahey Clinic. The results will be 
published later next year. 

The Cholesterol Screening Program was subject to a comprehensive inspection 
under the Health Care Finance Association for Clinical Laboratories 
Improvement Act of 1988. We were successful in the completion of proficiency 
testing in October 1994. 

Screenings were conducted this year for cholesterol, blood pressure, blood 
sugar and T.B. mantoux. Immunizations are given at no cost, except pneumovax, 
which is $5.00. 

The nurse attended an Immunization Conference sponsored by the Centers for 
Disease Control, an AIDS Awareness Two-Day Workshop, meetings of the Local 
Health 2000 Committee, and participated in the Community Health Network Area 
meetings in Woburn with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 



A. Communicable Disease Control; 



1. Immunizations 182 

Office-Flu 187 

Home-Flu 35 

Clinic-Flu 1476 

Pneumovax 1 

Hepatitis B 21 
Fees Collected $200.00 



-49- 



2. Communicable Disease Reported 63 
Home Visits 2 

3. Tuberculosis Contacts 
Office Visits 182 
Home Visits 3 

B. Public Health Nursing : 

1. Premature births /Newborn Report 

2. Morbidity-V.N.A. Calls/Office Visits 8 

3. General Health Supervision/Home Visits 188 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 128 
Telephone/Health Conference Call 81 

4. Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 755 

5. Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 20 
Fees Collected $20.00 

6. Other Screenings 

Breast Self-Examinations 15 

Blood Pressure 176 

Mantoux 15 

7. Senior Counseling/Drop-In Center 

Number of Sessions 46 

Hypertension Screening 601 

Diabetic Screening 34 

General Health (Injections) 9 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screening 41 

Fees Collected $34.00 

8. Lead Paint Testing 9 

9. Kodak Analyzer Testing 88 
Number of Tests 108 
Fees Collected $460.00 

10. Meetings 57 

11. Vaccine Distribution 71 

12. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $559.00 

C. Environmental Health; 

1. Transport/Haulers 29 
Stables 42 
Miscellaneous 28 
Perks 122 
Sewage 192 
Food 7 5 
Installers 25 
Sub-Divisions 9 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $53,378.00 

2. Meetings Attended 134 

3. Sewage Inspections 397 

4. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 133 

5. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed /REPAIRS 59 



-50- 



6. Food Establishment Inspections 

Food Service 82 

Retail Food 37 

Residential Kitchen 1 

Mobile Food 4 

7. Food Establishment Re-Inspections 

Food Service 42 

Retail Food 27 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 3 

8. Nuisance Complaints/Inspections 59 

9. Nuisance Complaints/Re-Inspections 68 

10. Housing Inspections 11 

11. Housing Re-Inspections 9 

12. Percolation/Water Tests 304 

13. Court Appearances 4 

14. Court Re-Appearance 

15. Hazardous Waste Investigations 2 

16. Camp Inspections 2 

17. Miscellaneous Inspections 40 

18. Lead Inspections 2 

19. Tobacco Control Prograun Inspections 13 



Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR 
(Code of Federal Regulations); Chapter 308 of the State Procurement Law, and 
State and Federal Code of Ethics. All state and federal programs are audited 
on an annual basis. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting of four 
elected and one state appointed member, oversees the Authority's policies and 
procedures. The Executive Director is charged with the administration of 
these procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) fcunilies and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 Certificate afid Voucher Programs. 

The state leased housing program has been severely curtailed and the Authority 
is seeking other ways in which it can provide housing for both senior citizens 
and families. Currently, all progreims are leased at 100%. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough housing 
for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally independently but 
who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington Housing 
Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive home 
care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed, and another program currently being 



-51- 



pursued by the Authority is housing for frail elders, which would provide 
housing, meals, medical care and other services, while allowing seniors to 
maintain private quarters. 

There were few vacancies in 1994 for the Senior Housing Development. However, 
in the low income properties there were four vacancies, of which many required 
major renovations. Also, two of the units had modifications so they would 
meet the A.D.A. requirements for the tenants who were to reside there. We 
were also fortunate enough to receive a grant from E.O.C.D. for an elevator. 
The elevator will be constructed in 1995 for our seniors at Deming Way 
Extension. Along with this being done, we will also be replacing all roofs at 
Deming Way for which we also received another grant. 

The Share Progreum was instituted in 1993 and since that time has doubled in 
size. A great deal of thanks to Dot Butler, Grace Rosa and Anna Stanley, the 
organizers of this program and to the many seniors and other community 
activists that make this program work. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. Also to Michael Caira, Town Manager, and all the 
town employees who bring a better quality of living to our tenants. 

BOARD MEMBERS EXPIRATION OF TERM 



Charles Fiore, Jr. - Chairman April 1998 

Lillian Hupper - Vice Chairman/State Appointee March 1998 

Dorothy A. Butler - Treasurer April 1995 

Melvin Keough - Vice Treasurer April 1996 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. - Secretary April 1997 



Town Counsel 



On January 1, 1994, there were pending the following actions by or against the 
Town (exclusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, 
and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in 
the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*). 



Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #77-BEM 0731, 0732 (complaint alleging sex 
discrimination) ( settlement discussions ongoing) 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira. et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari for 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) 

Ruth E. Marranzini. et al v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

William Baldwin, ppa. et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) 



-52- 



Ralph Fiore Bus Service, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L. c.93) 



Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al. Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa, et al v. William Clifford. Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford, v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L. c.229, s.2 and third party 
claim G.L. 
c. 231B) 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald. et al. Middlesex Superior Court #87-3541 
(action for appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under the 
Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U.S.C.) 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court) 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court) 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington . 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning official map (C.41, S.81E)) 

Taiena Corporation, d/b/a J's Food & Deli v. Gregory Erickson, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #90-1330 (complaint for civil rights violation and 
declaratory judgment concerning use of premises and for certiorari ) (partial 
judgment for the defendants on Counts 4 and 5) (Appeals Court Docket No. 
94P330) (settlement discussions ongoing) 

Bruce MacDonald, et al, v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts.. et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #90-4989 (appeal from decision of Housing Appeals Committee 
granting comprehensive permit/decision of Housing Court affirmed) Appeals 
Court #92P757 (appeal from decision of Middlesex Superior Court) 

Town of Wilmington v. Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems, Inc., et al . Supreme 
Judicial Court #90-558 (appeal from a decision of the Department of Public 
Utilities - Cross appeals have been filed in the Supreme Judicial Court) 

Scott C. Reinold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#91-4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging to tortious acts by the 
Wilmington Police Department) 

Priscilla Collins, Administratrix De Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) 

USTrust V. American Traveller. Inc.. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #92-5307 
(equity action to reach and apply funds claimed by the defendant, William Fay) 

Joseph P. McMenimen, et als v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts., et als , Middlesex 
Superior Court #92-6822 (appeal from further decision of Housing Appeals 
Committee) 

Town of Wilmington, et al v. Frances Dec, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-81861 (appeal from a decision of MCAD) (settlement discussions ongoing) 

Mildred F. Woods, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (petition to 
determine zoning relevancy) 



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Robert J. Araenault. et al v. Town Accountant of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #93-1555 (action for declaratory judgment) 



Jennifer L. Mulling, ppa. et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-0472 (claim for personal injury) 

Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board . Land 
Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G.L. c. 41, 
S81BB) 

Ruth Tkachuk, et al v. Wilmington Board of Appeals, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #195418 CDJ, ZJA, ZBJ, (action for zoning relief) 

Dorothy Wiberg v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #93-BEM 1530 (complaint alleging discrimination in hiring) 

Keith R. McConnell et ux v. Board of Appeals, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#93-6539 (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a variance) 

Richard Mullen v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Maiden District Court #93-1708 
(claim for personal injury) 

Joseph Lundergan v. Michael A. Caira, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #93-7035 
(request for equitable relief and restoration of lllF benefits) 

Robert P. Magliozzi, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-7141, (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a 
variance) 

Anna L» Percuoco v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission 
\gainst Discrimination #93-BEM 2185 (complaint alleging unlawful 
discrimination) 

Town of Wilmington v. Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination , 
Middlesex Superior Court (action for declaratory and injunctive relief and 
damages under 42 USC, §1983) 

Town of Wilmington v. William J. Fay, Jr.. a/k/a . United States Bankruptcy 
Court, Southern District of Florida, Adv. #93-1058-BKC-RAM-A (objection to 
discharge in bankruptcy) 



During the year 1994, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516 
(complaint for judicial review of zoning decision) 

Joanne M. Cuoco. et al v. Gregory Ericson. et al . Woburn District Court 
#945cvl090 (appeal from decision of Board of Health) 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration 
Association #11 390 01620 94 (grievance and claim for arbitration) 

Velma Em ery v. Richard A. Longo. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-5527 
(Appeal from the decision of the Planning Board) 

Joseph A. Langone, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court #37162-S-1994-09 
(petition to eliminate "paper streets") 

James J . Piro. et al v. Donald F. Sughrue. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#94-6399 (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

******************************** 



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During the year 1994, no new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

* There are pending as of January 1, 1995, separate petitions for 

abatements before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for 
several different years. 



During the year 1994, the following actions by or against the Town were 
disposed of: 

Dorothy Wiberq v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #93-BEM 1530 (dismissed with prejudice by agreement of the 
parties, after resolution of the complaint) 

Anna L. Percuoco v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Massachusetts Commission 
Against Discrimination #93-BEM 2185 (after preliminary hearing at MCAD, 
finding made of lack of probable cause) 

Town of Wilmington v. William J. Fay. Jr.. a/k/a . United States Bankruptcy 
Court, Southern District of Florida, Adv. #93-1058-BKC-RAM-A (disposed of by 
discharge of bankrupt by the Court) 

Robert J. Arsenault. et al v. Town Accountant of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #93-1555 (disposed of by allowance of Plaintiffs' Motion For 
Summary Judgment ordering payments be made to the Plaintiffs in accordance 
with the 1992-1993 Collective Bargaining Agreement) 

Richard Mullen v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Maiden District Court #93-1708 
(disposed of by Motion for Summary Judgment allowed on behalf of the Town 
resulting in dismissal of claims) 

Jennifer L. Mullins, ppa, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-0472 (claim for personal injury settled) 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association #11 390 01620 94 (withdrawn at Union's request) 

Town of Wilmington v. Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems, Inc.. et al , Supreme 
Judicial Court #90-558 (cross appeal of Southwestern Bell dismissed by action 
of Supreme Judicial Court, without prejudice) 

Joseph Lundergan v. Michael A. Caira, et al . Middlesex Superior Court #93-7035 
(claim for restoration of lllF benefits dismissed) 

Town of Wilmington v. Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination . 
Middlesex Superior Court (dismissed) 



-55- 



Historical Commission 



With great pride, the Wilmington Historical Commission acknowledges the bi- 
centennial of the Baldwin Apple Monument (1895-1995). This monument, located 
on Chestnut Street, is owned by the Count Rumford Association of Woburn and 
indicates the site where the first Baldwin apple was discovered. 

Ten new historical building plaques have been prepared and affixed to 
Wilmington's town-owned public buildings. These plaques show the original 
owner or purpose for the building and date of construction. 

Our ongoing concern is to protect the old West Schoolhouse. In this effort, 
the Commission continued to research ways by which funds to restore this 
historic landmark could be obtained. 

The Colonel Joshua Harnden Tavern is open for free tours on the first Sunday 
of each month from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Commission also welcomes 
private tours by appointment. The Commission continues to encourage school 
groups to tour the Tavern and to appreciate Wilmington's rich heritage. This 
year, the Commission hosted many students and civic groups on tours of the 
Tavern. 

The Friends of the Harnden Tavern held Strawberry and Harvest Festivals and a 
Christmas Social. Each function held was well attended and thoroughly enjoyed 
by all. 

Membership in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic 
Massachusetts have been renewed. 

The Historical Commission is thankful to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Public Works and Public Buildings Departments for their support and hard work. 

The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month in Room 4 of the Town 
Hall at 7:30 p.m. 




The ColonelJoshua Harnden Tavern is open for tours on the first Su>hia\ oj I'mh munih. 



-56- 



Carter Lecture Fund 



The Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee has continued to bring to the 
people of Wilmington interesting and entertaining programs since 1910 through 
the generosity of prominent citizen Sarah Carter who left the town a bequest 
for that purpose. 

The April 28, 1994 program held at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School 
proved to be a spectacular slide/lecture. "Always Something Doing ... A 
History of Boston's Infeimous Scollay Square" was presented by David S. Kruh, 
an author from Reading who is too young to have remembered this well-known 
landmark in its hey-day. Nearly everyone in the large audience was very 
feuniliar with it and enjoyed every step down memory lane. Mr. Kruh related a 
history of Scollay Square when it was more than an entertainment center. He 
spoke of the times when The Sons of Liberty, The Abolishionists and Thomas 
Edison spent time here long before Sally Keith, Sally Rand and Ann Curio came 
upon the scene. The elite called it home and many successful businesses 
flourished. David Kruh was a delightful and knowledgeable speaker who had 
spent many hours researching his topic and collecting numerous photos which he 
used to enhance his delightful program. The attendees felt compelled to tell 
their many stories about Scollay Square to which Mr. Kruh attentively listened 
thus prolonging the enjoyable evening. 

It will be difficult for the committee to measure up to this program but it is 
diligently working on it. Currently serving on this committee are: Chairman 
Elizabeth White, Treasurer Dorothy Lafionatis, Recording Secretary Ann 
Berghaus, Corresponding Secretary Andrea Houser and Publicity Adele Passmore. 
Anyone with suggestions for programming is welcome to contact any member. 



Public Buildings Department 




Members of the Public Buildings Department after receiving their "Safe Driver" Awards. 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town 
owned buildings and the cleaning and sanitary condition of all schools and 
town buildings. We are committed to keep these buildings operable and safe 
for town employees, school personnel and the general public. 



-57- 



The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
1994: 

A handicap wheelchair lift was installed at the Shawsheen School to enable a 
person in a wheelchair to enter and exit all levels. 

School Administration Building (Roman House) was painted this summer and a new 
sign installed in front. 

New raised lettered and braille signs required by A.D.A. Laws were made and 
installed at the Shawsheen, Woburn Street, West and North Intermediate 
Schools. 

An extension of four bays behind the fire station was built by Shawsheen Tech 
students and Public Buildings employees. A large number of donations were 
received to make this possible. 

All hallway ceilings were painted this past summer at the Wildwood School. 

During the summer, all school buildings were prepared for a successful opening 
in September. 

Voting machines were programmed and set up for all elections. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
town departments, school administration, and especially all the employees of 
the Public Buildings Department for their continued help, support and co- 
operation in making 1994 a productive year. 



Recreation Commission 



The Wilmington Recreation Department, in its 24th year with a full-time 
Director, continued to meet new challenges while delivering a comprehensive 
slate of leisure opportunities for the citizens of Wilmington. 

Although the Recreation Department remains a small department, with only one 
full-time employee, it represents the second largest industry in the nation. 
In fact, Americans spend about 12 percent of their personal income on 
recreation. 

The Recreation Commission consists of five volunteer citizens appointed by the 
Town Manager. This board functions in a policy making and advisory capacity 
to the Director. Board members are active in many local organizations 
assuring continued contact and communication with the Recreation Department. 

The Recreation Commission and Director keep in mind the following departmental 
objectives as they plan and conduct recreation programs throughout the year: 

* provide opportunities for self-expression 

* develop a sense of personal worth 

* provide activities that allow for personal 
achievement and accomplishment 

* provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

* provide physical activities which are new and 
different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants 

* teach skills in various activities that will have 
carryover value in later life 

* provide a healthy and diversified progrcim of recreation 
activities in an attempt to meet the needs and interests of the 
people being served 

A town-wide recreation survey taken last year offered us these insights and 
guidelines: a) family satisfaction with recreation was moderate, b) 
respondents placed recreation as a high priority public service, c) our 
dependence upon user fees with tax support is the desired way of financing the 



-58- 



department, d) most respondents participate in a recreation program, e) age 
groups, in order, needing more recreation are junior high age, middle age then 
pre-school. 

Our total funding comes from a variety of sources. User fees and donations 
heavily supplement the town funded budget which was decimated by the effects 
of Proposition 2 1/2 many years ago. We are pleased with our continued 
ability to offer high quality programs at very reasonable costs. We are able 
to do this because we utilize fund raising methods which are services too. 
These services are: various trips. Town Hall soda machine, sale of Wilmington 
sweatshirts and t-shirts, sale of Entertainment Books, sale of Town Cards, 
sale of Ski Books and canoe rental. Further, on a positive note, we are 
seeing an increase in unsolicited donations from families and businesses. 
Shawsheen Tech helps us with printing and provided us with a donated computer. 
The Odd Fellows provided funds for valuable CPR mannequins. We will continue 
to search for new and innovative ways to generate needed funds and equipment. 
Volunteers always play a key role in providing two dollars worth of service 
for every dollar spent. We also receive much help from local clubs and 
organizations. Some of these invaluable contributors are: Rotary, Lions 
Club, Kiwanis, Chamber of Commerce, Wilmington Town Employees Association, 
Tewksbury /Wilmington Elks, Police Association, Custodial Union, Sons of Italy, 
Dunkin Donuts, Special Needs PAC, Analog Devices, Stelio's Restaurant, F & R 
Auto Supply, McDonald's, Burger King, Auxiliary Police, Camp Forty Acres, 
Pepsi Cola, Tootsie's Kitchen, Market Basket, Textron, MASSBANK for Savings, 
Shriners and Odd Fellows. 




Odd Fellows Lodge members Walter Dalton. Captain Frank Mitchell and Sam Bertwell present Recreation Director Ron Swasey with 
CPR mannequins. 



-59- 



The Recreation Department is always involved, in varying degrees, with many 
recreation oriented groups. In this capacity, we serve as a quasi-consulting 
agency. We also loan recreation equipment to families and groups of all typei 
for various functions. We program use of the Shawsheen Tech pool for scouts 
and other groups. We are a diverse information source and referral agency 
answering a wide variety of questions every day. 



Coupons, Disney on Ice at Boston Garden, Special Needs Programs, Florida 
Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg Hunt, Circus Tickets at Boston Garden, Bruins 
Tickets, Summer Playground, Tiny Tcts, Special Needs Day Camp, Public Beach 
Lifeguard Supervision, Canoe Rental and Clinic, Cranes Beach Sand Castle Day, 
Tennis Lessons, Concerts of the Common, Red Sox Trips, Fishing Derby, Co-Ed 
Volleyball, Free Loan of Fishing, Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, Aerobics, Hawaii 
and other VCR Tapes, Police Association Beach Day, Easter Coloring Contest, 
Sale of Entertainment Discount Books, Special Needs Trips to the Shriners 
Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom and Country Western Dancing Lessons, Atlantic City 
Trips, Kinder Karate, Junior Basketball, Topsfield Fair Tickets, Rafting, Big 
"E" Tickets, Sale of Ski Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball League and 
Clinics, Connecticut Casino Trips, Golf Lessons, Lake George Trip, Letters 
from Santa, Las Vegas Trips, Dried Statice Wreath Workshops, Christmas Boxwood 
Tree Workshop, Nantucket Trip, Martha's Vineyard Trip, Six Flags over New 
Jersey Trip, Town Park Softball Leagues, Phantom of the Opera Trip, Roller 
Skating Trips for Intermediate Schools, Overnight Trip to New York City with 
Rockettes Christmas Show, Boston Harbor Cruise, Sale of Tickets to Water 
Country, Sale of Town Cards and Co-Sponsorship of K of C Shootout. 

We try to remain versatile, not stereotyped. Due to change in demand and 
other factors, we change our offerings to the tune of 10-20% each year. 

Some of the other groups that offer leisure type prograuns in Wilmington are: 
Little League, Elderly Services Department, Youth Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure 
Skating Club, Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, Tennis Club, July 4th Committee, 
Community Schools, Council for the Arts, Scouts, Campfire and the Skating 
Rink. Schools and churches round out the active recreation picture. 




programs are: 
Santa ' s 
Workshop, 
Horribles 
Parade, Elks 
Christmas Party 
for Special 
Kids, Special 
Needs PAC 
Christmas Party 
for Special 
Kids, Christmas 
Shopping Trip to 
New York City, 
Spring Trip to 
New York City, 
Basketball 
League, Adult 
Gym, Swimming 
Lessons, CPR, 
First Aid, 
Gymnastics, 
Aerobics, Cinema 
Discounts, 
Discounts to 
Other Commercial 
Recreation 
Enterprises, 
Discount 



basic 



Campers and volunteers from Camp Wildwood during a field trip to the Franklin Park Zoo. 



-60- 



The lack of 
commercial 
recreation in 
Wilmington, such 
as bowling 
centers and 
movie theaters 
and the lack of 
agencies such as 
YMCA's and 
Boys/Girls Clubs 
stresses the 
importance for 
town support of 
this Department, 
especially now 
with a growing 
youth population 
and a growing 
demand for 
recreation 
opportunities . 




Summer Youth Basketball League f;ame at the Shawsheen School. 



Veterans Services 



Veterans Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 
115, as amended, with strict compliance to this chapter, the rules and 
policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran and his immediate fcunily who have been 
subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits comes from the 
Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, MA. 

Total expended 
for aid to 
veterans and 
their feunilies 
for the entire 
year was 
$10,985.50. 
The balance of 
the first six 
months of 1994 
from previous 
appropriations 
was $5,030.50 
total 
available 
funds 

beginning in 
July 1, 1994 
was 

$10,000.00. Members of the High School Color Guard stand at attention during Memorial Day 

Cemetery. 




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The amount of additional benefits expended by the Veterans Administration 
directly to the veteran population in Wilmington was $91,350.00 for benefits 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1994, representing the amount of tax 
dollars not required to be expended for those who, because of circumstances, 
find it necessary to apply for aid. 



Library 

The 1994 Annual Report of the Wilmington Memorial Library, with accompanying 
statistics, is herewith submitted. 

The Memorial Library looks back on 1994 as a year of change and looks forward 
to 1995 as a year of planning and progress. Developments in the fields of 
electronics and information science have catapulted the library world toward 
the twenty-first century, causing the role of libraries and of librarians to 
shift and grow to meet the needs of the future while continuing to meet the 
demands of the present. 

In increasing numbers, patrons of all ages sought materials, service and 
information during 1994 as the library and its staff renewed a commitment to 
build a collection of materials responsive to community needs and interests; 
to locate and obtain, through inter-library loan, materials requested by 
patrons which were not available at the library; to supply up-to-date 
information or access to it; to help patrons make use of library materials and 
equipment appropriate to their needs and requests; and to introduce to the 
public, through programs and an emphasis on public relations, the wide variety 
of resources and expertise available at the library. 

The Reference Department found during 1994 that student assignments, faunily 
matters and personal projects predominated - from research into earliest life 
to a recent rise in genealogical interest. Inquiries for ancestors from 
points as far away as California show that Wilmington's off-spring, though 
scattered afar, still find their local origins important. More immediate 
patron concerns were with business start-ups, money management and widespread 
interest in the Internet and the "Information Highway". 

Concentrated effort to build up the Adult Department's collection of materials 
began in the fall. Withdrawal of older, inaccurate or no longer useful items 
was begun earlier in the year both to up-date the collection and to make room 
for new acquisitions. Traditional, basic, technical services operations 
continued in the background all year as old materials were withdrawn, 
repaired, or replaced and new materials were ordered, classified, entered into 
the database, and readied for the shelves. Lucy Percuoco's special technical 
abilities proved invaluable in getting materials ordered and in keeping the 
database accurate. Dorothy Wiberg's creative skills made old books look like 
new and contributed to the preparation of attractive library displays. 

A major Technical Services Department responsibility which has developed and 
accelerated over recent years is that of overseeing the operations of the 
library's electronic resources. Added to the knowledge required for keeping 
up with evolving MVLC (Merrimack Valley Library Consortium) operations is the 
need for familiarity with the library's various personal computers and other 
new electronic equipment. At the year's end, the new reader-printer for the 
library's collection of microfilm and microfiche was installed and put to 
immediate use. 

The Main Circulation Desk is the visible hub of the library, the major 
connection point between patrons and library services. It is usually here 
that questions are first asked and patrons directed to the people, the 
materials, the information resources, the equipment or facilities they seek. 
In 1994 over fifteen thousand reference and service requests were recorded. 
At busy times, which occurred more frequently than in the past, as many as 
three staff members could be seen at the main desk caring for patron needs. 

More than circulation statistics indicate, greatly increased activity was 
evident throughout the library on both floors - at circulation desks, at the 
computers and copy machines, in the browsing areas. Students thronged the 



-62- 



reference sections doing research and fulfilling assignments as busy 
librarians employed print and electronic sources to help them - sometimes 
three or four at once needing one staff member's attention. An increase in 
the number of elementary and middle school assignments was evident in the 
number of times alert librarians had to set aside collections of books on an 
assigned topic for desk reserve. 

The Children's Department is organized to serve the needs of babies through 
middle schoolers, as well as the parents and adults who work with them. It 
experienced in 1994 the same explosion of activity as the rest of the library. 
Pre-school Story Hours, the parent /child program for two-year olds and the 
year-end holiday celebration were fully subscribed as always. Six hundred and 
thirty-four children enrolled in the summer reading program and received 
reading kits tied to the state's summer reading theme for libraries, "Ticket 
to Read". Drawings, prizes, contests, a special Museum of Science program on 
dinosaurs, but above all the simple pleasures of reading lured children to the 
library from June to September. The fall witnessed a return to busy 
afternoons at the library after school. Assistant Children's Librarian, Susan 
MacDonald, ably and graciously carried the major weight of this increased 
activity as she helped to run down information for school reports and to find 
materials and books that patrons wanted. 

Donations of books and other materials are gratefully accepted when they fill 
a particular need and are appropriate for the library's collection. In 1994 
popular new paperbacks in pristine condition comprised seventy-four percent of 
the gift books added to the collection. Three community organizations 
generously funded the family Museum Pass Program. The elementary school PACs 
donated passes to the Aquarium and the Children's Museum; the Wilmington 
Council for the Arts donated passes to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; and the Wilmington Community Fund donated 
passes to the Museum of Science and the new museum at the JFK Library. The 
Wilmington Lion's Club donated a collection of videos for the visually 
impaired and several patrons donated copies of magazines recorded for the 
blind. 

A variety of exhibits filled the front hall entrance during the year. "Fun on 
the Fourth" and "A Salute to Wilmington Graduates" were among those arranged 
by staff members. Arlene Ten Dyke's extensive foreign doll collection was on 
view all summer in connection with the children's summer program and Francis 
Toohey's fascinating collection of Mexican folk art depicting the "Fiesta of 
the Days of the Dead" was on display in October. During Children's Book Week 
in November, dolls and books from the American Girls Collection were on view 
downstairs. Book displays changed weekly. 

Requests for use of the library's meeting rooms multiplied during the year as 
community needs for meeting and activity space increased. The Job Resource 
Center housed in the Conference Room closed when the Small Cities Program 
sponsorship ended in December, but the computer and printer remains available 
for use at the library. 

Continuing education became especially important in 1994 as the library field 
itself experienced change. Many staff members took part in Eastern Region and 
MVLC workshops. Library Trustee Martha Stevenson and Technical Services 
Librarian Christina Stewart attended a New England Library Association 
Conference and Circulation Librarian Laura Hodgson finished her first semester 
of graduate study in Library Science at Simmons. 

Note is made of the many and various personnel changes throughout the year. 
In the spring and summer, two full-time positions were restored. Dorothy 
Wiberg became a full-time Library Assistant in the Technical Services 
Department after eight years of part-time experience, enhancing both technical 
services operations and public service. Christina Stewart was appointed to 
head the Technical Services Department. The library welcomed Tina's return to 
full-time status after ten years of part-time service. She had previously 
worked for ten years as full-time Reference and Adult Services Librarian. 

Two Children's Department Pages left at the end of the summer to go off to 
college and Joanne Bassett, Library Assistant in the Circulation Department, 
resigned in November after six years of part-time library service. 



-63- 



Library Director Philip Meriam retired in the fall after twenty-three years at 
the library. It was during his administration that the library entered the 
computer age by joining the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium in 1985. 
Children's Services Librarian Sarah Rueter was appointed Acting Library 
Director in September. 

The entire library staff (both full and part-time) gave unselfishly and 
without stint to ensure that the library met its obligations to the public in 
a time of transition. They are to be highly commended for their devotion to 
library service. 

In December, the Board of Trustees appointed a Long Range Planning Committee 
to identify Wilmington's public library needs for the future. Through 
analysis and community surveys, library service needs, goals and objectives 
will be developed. Committee members are Sarah Rueter, Christina Stewart 
(Committee Coordinator), Martha Stevenson, Steven Leet and Lester White. It 
is expected that a completed plan approved by the Trustees will be on file 
with the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners by October 1, 1995. The 
Long Range Plan will not only fulfill one of the eligibility requirements for 
certain state and federal grants, but will point the library along a specific 
course for the next three to five years. 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1994 

Hours Open Weekly 



Winter 56 

Monday through Saturday 9-5 

Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 

Summer 48 

Monday through Friday 9-5 

Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 18,488 

Holdings and Acquisitions 

Total number of volumes at end of 1994 87,958 

Number of volumes beginning 1994 86,607 

Number of volumes purchased in 1994 2,787 

Number of gifts added in 1994 1,081 

Number of volumes withdrawn in 1994 2,517 

Number of volumes per capita 4.76 

Newspapers - Titles 10 

Periodicals - Titles 148 

Microfilm - Titles 14 

AV Materials - Items 2,335 

Museum Passes 6 

Registered Borrowers 

Total number at end of 1994 13,717 

New borrowers registered in 1994 1,009 

Percentage of population registered 74% 

Circulation Activity 

*Total Circulation for 1994 145,791 

Circulation to non-residents 15,064 

Circulation per capita 7.07 

Reserves placed 4,007 



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Retrospective Circulation 

1990 127,782 

1991 139,233 

1992 147,499 

1993 149,662 

Inter-library Loan 

Items loaned to other libraries 1,409 
Items borrowed from other libraries 1,481 

Reference and Reader's Services for 1994 15,626 (est.) 

Meeting Room Use 

Conference Room Reservations in 1994 70 
Bi-Centennial Room Reservations in 1994 18 
Patrons signed in for individual use 406 



Programs in 1994 



Total number of programs in 1994 
Pre-school 
Summer 

Group visits 
Special programs 



89 



Total attendance at programs in 1994 



1,958 



Pre-school 
Summer 

Group visits 
Special progreuns 



1,153 
634 
106 
65 



Exhibits 



♦Computer-generated circulation statistics were supplied by the 
Merrrimack Valley Library Consortium. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



The following is a summary of the inspections carried out from January 1, 1994 
to December 31, 1994 by the Sealer of Weights and Measures: 



Tested and sealed truck scales 7 
Tested and sealed scales under 

100 lbs (supermarket type) 78 
Tested and sealed pharmacy weights 

(apothecary and metric) 111 

Tested and sealed gas meters 157 

Adjusted gas meters 16 

Tested and sealed oil truck meters 3 
Checked oil trucks in town not sealed 

by sealer 6 
Random weight checks of prepackaged 

goods 500 

Condemned scales 1 
Random visits of stores for proper 

signs and price markings 10 
Inspection fees collected $2,411 



-65- 



Elderly Services Department 



During 1994, we increased our number of new seniors with many residents 
reaching 60 years of age. We also welcomes persons 60 years and older who 
moved into Wilmington from other towns and cities. The majority of these 
seniors were in their early sixties. Being in reasonably good health, they 
wanted to get involved in our many health, activity and volunteer programs, as 
a means of meeting new friends in their age bracket. 

With the help of a full time Respite Care Provider, a part-time clerk, a part- 
time Minibus Driver, two part-time Meals On Wheels Drivers and many volunteers 
assisting the Director, we met the needs of all seeking our help. 

Unfortunately, problems of the elderly did not decrease this year. On the 
contrary, they increased. Many of our older seniors began living their lives 
alone with the passing of their spouse. Extended illness for many such as 
cancer, alzheimers, strokes and disabling heart problems lead to serious 
financial problems for many. With the escalating cost of medical care, 
prescription drugs, the cost of medical insurance, nursing home care and in- 
home nursing care, the senior's monthly income had been cut to the poverty 
level, leaving them lonely and depressed. They felt, when they retired, their 
pension would allow them to live comfortably for the rest of their lives. 
They never expected an illness would leave them with almost nothing. We were 
able to give them as much help as we could through our programs and services. 
Many referrals were made to agencies that have federally funded programs that 
helped them with free services and support groups to help them cope with their 
illness. 

This year we saw an increase 
in financial exploitation, 
protective services and 
elders at risk cases. To 
help these seniors, 
referrals were made to 
Minuteman Home Care. Last 
year all area agencies were 
given federal funds to set 
up programs that could help 
seniors being abused 
financially, physically, 
mentally or verbally by 
members of their family or 
hired caregivers, and 
seniors abusing themselves 
through neglect, refusal to 
eat, over medicating 
themselves or over indulging 
with drugs and alcohol. Of 
the seniors we placed in 
these programs, the majority 
are doing well, a few could 
not be helped and one passed 
away while several others 
were put into guarded care 
in nursing homes. 

We received many calls for 
financial help. These 
seniors were referred to the Rotary Club, Kiwanis Club, Fire Department and 
the Community Fund. Other referrals were made to the Social Security Office 
for SSI, Welfare Office for 

Food Stamps and Medicaid, Community Teamwork for emergency fuel and oil burner 
services, Minuteman Homecare for homemakers. Mystic Valley Mental Help for 
seniors in depression. Elder Legal Services and the Visiting Nurse Association 
for Home Health Aides. Many counseling sessions were held on all the above- 
mentioned problems. Also, many home visits were made to shut-ins living alone 
with problems that had to be addressed. 




-66- 



On the happier side of the year, we were pleased with the number of seniors 
entering the Senior Center to participate in our activity and health classes 
and prograuns. Others came to socialize with their peers at our monthly 
therapeutic social, use the exercise machines, play pool, make a puzzle, read 
our latest magazines donated by Bill Cavanaugh, watch TV or to only join in 
conversation over a cup of coffee in the kitchen. 

It is becoming very evident every year that we are living longer. Years ago 
to hear of a person living to be 90 and older was unbelievable. Today we have 
many persons in the country who are in their 90 's up to 100. We have eight 
coming into the center who are 90 or older. Our Respite Care Provider is 
serving several seniors in their nineties who are living alone, including one 
who is blind. They are taken to medical appointments along with those who are 
disabled and living alone. She remains with the seniors for the doctor's 
instructions. Being hard of hearing and either in a wheel chair or on a 
walker, they could not get around or understand what the doctor was saying. 
She has to get prescriptions filled and makes out medical calendars in large 
letters so that the senior can read the time a pill in the calendar box has to 
be taken. She comforts other seniors after taking them home from a cancer 
treatment . 



With the help of Analog Devices, the Senior Fair, and the Lions Club we make 
the holidays a little happier by delivering 325 catered holiday dinners to the 
delight of homebound seniors. 

As the Director of Elder Services, I met the needs of our elder residents in 
1994 through referrals to federal, state and municipal branches of government. 
Those were Social Security for problems with benefit checks. Medicare and SSI, 
Welfare Office for problems seniors had with food stamps and Medicaid, MMHC 
Protective Services, Homemakers, Day Care, Elders at Risk, Money Management 
and Meals On Wheels, when our schools were closed. Others included the 
Visiting Nurse Association, Home Health Aides and Nurses, Mystic Valley Mental 
Health, Drug Abuse, and Depression, Board of Nutrition, Surplus Commodities, 
Attorney General, Legal Assistance for help with scams against the elderly. 
Elder Housing, Emergency Housing for two seniors being abused, and Share A 
Ride Transportation to Boston Hospitals. 

In 1994 we received 6,434 telephone calls for services and information. 
Other services through the Elderly Services Department were: 



Transportation to medical and other 

related travel 5,427 

Meals on Wheels to shut-ins 15,892 
Applications for fuel, weatherization and oil 

burners replaced or repaired 166 

Kitchen Socialization throughout the year 9,449 

Surplus Commodities 188 

MBTA senior passes 89 
Total participation in all health and activity 

prograuns 20,284 



To the following we extend our thanks enabling us to deliver the above 
services: 



The taxpayers for approving our budget $107,358 

Community Teaunwork 76,701 

Minuteman Home Care 383,293 

Executive Office of Elder Affairs for grant 7,410 

Seniors Fair donation 3,406 



Federal, state and municipal departments: Town Hall, Public Works, Public 
Buildings, Police, Fire and School for help when requested. 



-67- 



We also thank the Town Manager for his help and guidance and the following 
clubs for their donations to the senior citizens. 

Lions Club for their holiday catered dinner to our homebound seniors 
Tewksbury/ Wilmington Elks for their annual dinner dance and donation 

towards the rental of their hall for our therapeutic socials 
Kiwanis Club for their $30 monthly donation to a needy senior and their 

annual shut-in dinner 
Rotary Club for their $50 monthly Market Basket gift certificate to a 

needy senior 

Thanks to all the many seniors who volunteered hundreds of hours visiting 
seniors in their homes, hospitals and nursing homes, instructing our weekly 
activity classes and programs and those who volunteer on odd jobs at the 
center. To all who helped in any way in making the lives of the elderly 
residents in Wilmington more meaningful in 1994, we are very grateful. 



Commission on Disabilities 

Wilmington's Commission on Disabilities has tried to meet the needs of the 
disabled population of Wilmington during the past year. Our major activity 
has been to raise sufficient funds for the purchase of the Xerox Reading Edge 
reading machine to be placed in the Wilmington Memorial Public Library. I am 

happy to report that we have been successful in raising the $5,495.00 needed 
to purchase this machine. There is also a $50 shipping charge. This machine 
will be installed and demonstrated on January 18, 1995 at 2:30 P.M. at the 
library. 

We want to express thanks to the Wilmington Lions' Club for their generous 
$1,200 contribution towards the purchase of this machine. Also, we want to 
thank the many citizens who made contributions towards the purchase of this 
machine. During the July 4th celebrations, a box was placed at the site for 
contributions. Some $30.00 was gathered through these efforts. Thanks again 
to those who contributed. 

We also addressed issues of transportation for the disabled of Wilmington. We 
are investigating the possible purchase of a van or some combination with the 
senior citizens transportation efforts so as to provide transportation for 
disabled people on a call as needed basis. We hope to have some program which 
will enable disabled people to more effectively get transportation to such 
activities as shopping, medical needs or, if possible, job transportation. 
This work is not complete but we look forward to improving the transportation 
needs of the disabled community. 

We have a good working relationship with Wilmington's ADA Committee and the 
Wilmington Committee for Citizens with Disabilities. We look forward to 
working with these groups for a better life for the disabled. We work with 
these groups to improve access to activities with Wilmington's Recreation 
Department. Progress has been made through the work of all of these 
organizations in improving access to recreational activities. 

We have had a problem in gathering minutes for all meetings. Some of this has 
been due to our secretary not being able to attend all meetings. Because of 
some disabilities cunong the members, keeping minutes is not always efficiently 
done. We are attempting to reconstruct the minutes and will furnish such 
reports to the town as soon as completed. We know that this is a requirement 
of our organization and the Town Hall's requirements. We hope to correct this 
situation. 

We have achieved much success in this past year. We look forward to the use 
of the reading machine by the blind and others who are limited in their 
ability to access readable print. Richard Gage will be involved in training 
library staff and users in the use of the Xerox Reading Edge reading machine. 



-68- 



We hope the transportation issues indicated in this report will show 
improvement in the next year. We want more participation by the citizens of 
Wilmington in our efforts to improve the life of the disabled. We appreciate 
your input toward these efforts. 



ADA Advisory Committee 

This committee has been active since 1992 and is primarily responsible to 
serve in an advisory capacity to the Town Manager with respect to implementing 
the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA, which 
was signed into law in July of 1990, requires that communities make reasonable 
accommodations to ensure that their facilities, programs and services are 
equally accessible to all people. 

This past year, the committee has provided comment and recommendations on the 
town's on-going transition plan, its self-evaluation and a proposed grievance 
procedure. All three documents have been submitted to the Town Manager for 
his review. The self-evaluation is an analysis of the accessibility of 
programs and services offered by the Town of Wilmington to its disabled 
residents. Services and programs which currently offer limited access to the 
disabled population have been identified. Solutions to remove the limited 
access have also been proposed. The transition plan identifies structural 
barriers which impede the access of disabled individuals into school and 
general government buildings. The transition plan establishes a proposed 
schedule to remove the structural barriers. The grievance procedure will 
offer individuals an opportunity to seek relief if they believe that they have 
been discriminated against with respect to access to facilities, programs or 
services. These documents are in draft form and will be available to the 
public in 1995. 

The ADA Advisory Committee has raised concerns about the lack of public 
transportation for disabled individuals. The committee believes that disabled 
individuals should have the same access to transportation as is currently 
available to Wilmington seniors through the senior van. The committee plans 
to propose options for making such transportation available. 

The ADA Advisory Committee wishes to acknowledge the numerous accomplishments 
which the town has made over the past few years to remove barriers to access. 
An elevator has been installed at the West Intermediate School in addition to 
three chairlifts which makes the building totally accessible to the mobility 
impaired. The Shawsheen Elementary School is now totally accessible due to 
the recent installation of one chairlift. Evacu-chairs have been installed in 
the West Intermediate School, Wilmington High School, the Shawsheen School and 
the Memorial Library. These chairs enable mobility impaired individuals to be 
safely transported from the upper floor to the first floor in cases such as 
fire emergency where the elevator cannot be used. The town has utilized its 
new sign machine to make raised lettering and braille signs. Signage in all 
school buildings now has the raised lettering and braille. Automatic door 
openers have been installed on restroom doors in the Town Hall to remove the 
barrier to access for mobility impaired individuals. Due to the efforts of 
the Wilmington Commission on Disabilities and the generous donations from the 
Lions Club and residents, a reading machine has been purchased for the 
Wilmington Memorial Library. The machine scans and verbalizes printed 
material . 

The committee has begun meeting with general government departments to discuss 
ways that departments may be able to remove barriers to their programs and 
services. In addition, through the cooperation of WCTV, the committee has 
publicized information about rights and responsibilities, available under the 
ADA, to the WCTV viewing audience. 

Serving as a source of information for the general public and for Wilmington's 
municipal government will continue to be a major focus of this committee. 



-69- 



Board of Appeals 



APPLICANT 

Case 1-94 

N . E . Development 

20 Middlesex Ave 



Case 2-94 
Salvatore Lupoli 
4 Forest St. 
Chelmsford 



Case 3-94 

Sergio F. DeMango 

7 Kenwood Avenue 



Case 4-94 

Mary & Geo Nelson 

78 Swain Road 



Case 5-94 

Fifth Rlty Trust 

78 Swain Road 



Case 6-94 
Lawrence S. Toppi 
3 Lime Street 



Case 7-94 

Arthur J. Moscufo 

14 Gorham Street 



Case 8-94 
Susan Parrella 
2 Everett Avenue 



REASON FOR APPEAL DECISION 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 5.3.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
Zoning Bylaws to demolish an existing dwell- 
ing on a pre-existing lot and to rebuild a 
new dwelling for property located on Jacquith 
Road & Harden Street. (Asseeeor's Map 20 
Parcel 26) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 6.1.1 of the Zoning Bylaws 

to continue an existing use (restaurant) for 

property located at 232 Lowell Street. 

(Assessor's Map 49 Parcel 56) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 
sional regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a pool 
for property located at 7 Kenwood Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 59 Parcel 52) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 
5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4, 5,2.5 and 5.3.2 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient area, frontage, width, front 
and side yard setbacks for a single family 
dwelling for property located at Poplar St. 
(Assessor's Map 6 Parcel 22) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 

sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 

of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 

insufficient front yard setback for a single 

family dwelling for property located on 

Poplar Street. (Assessor's Map 6 Parcel 20) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 

sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 

the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 

insufficient rear yard setback for a pool 

for property located at 3 Lime Street. 

(Assessor's Map 51 Parcel 73D) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
and 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot 
having insufficient front and side yard set- 
back for a pool for property located at 14 
Gorham St. (Assessor's Map 67 Parcel 33A) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 8.3,3, 8.5 and 4.2.7 of the 

Zoning Bylaws for an Accessory Apartment 

located on a lot with less than 15,000 sq. 

ft. of land for property located at 2 

Everett Avenue. (Assessor's Map 55 Parcel 

102) 



-70- 



Case 9-94 
Charles Courtoit 
107 Nichols St 



Case 10-94 
Mary Nelson 
78 Swain Road 



To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Granted 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient rear yard setback for a pool 
for property located at 107 Nichols Street. 
(Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 108A) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- Denied 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.3.2 of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a pre-existing lot having 
insufficient area, frontage, width and front 
yard setback for a single family dwelling for 
property located on Walnut Street. 
(Assessor's Map 6 Parcel 24) 



Case 11-94 
William Troy 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from standard dimen- 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient frontage for a single family 
dwelling for property located on Ogunc[uit Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 50 Parcel 78) 



Granted 



Case 12-94 

Daniel Fonzi 

26 Ashwood Avenue 



To accpjire a variance from standard dimen- 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
and 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a 
lot having insufficient front, side and rear 
yard setback for a shed for property located 
at 26 Ashwood Avenue. (Assessor's Map R4 
Parcel 41) 



Granted 



Case 13-94 
Anthony Lisa 
2 Hardin Street 



Case 14-94 
Gloria Medeiros 
84 Swain Road 



To acquire a variance from standard dimen- 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for an 
addition for property located at 2 Hardin 
Street. (Assessor's Map 20 Parcel 46) 

To acc[uire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
for a lot having insufficient rear yard 
setback for a screened-in porch for pro- 
perty located at 84 Swain Road. (Assessor 
Map 7 Parcel 97) 



Granted 



Granted 



Case 15-95 
Woodhill Rlty Tr. 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Section 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 5R Fernbanks Rd. (Assessor's 
Map 15 Parcel 105) 



Granted 



Case 16-94 
Woodhill Rlty Tr. 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave. 



Case 17-94 
Gregory Hunt 
8 Drury Lane 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 9R Fernbanks Road. 
(Assessor's Map 15 Parcel 109) 

To acquire a variance from standard dimen- 
sional regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 
pool to remain no closer than 13 feet from 
the side yard lot line and a deck no closer 
than the existing pool to the side yard lot 
line for property located at 8 Drury Lane. 
(Assessor's Map 66 Parcel 38) 



Granted 



Granted 



-71- 



Case 18-94 
Telor Opthalmic 
265 Ballardvale 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.1 (Use), Sec. 3.6.5 (Limited 
Manufacturing), Sec. 3.6.6 (General Manu- 
facturing) and Sec. 4.1.10 (Scientific 
Development) of the Zoning Bylaws for 
property located at 265 Ballardvale Street. 
(Assessor's Map R2 Parcel 26C) 



Granted 



Case 19-94 
Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 15 Stonehedge Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 18 & 18F) 



Granted 



Case 20-94 
Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 14 Stonehedge Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 18 & 18F) 



Granted 



Ca£ 



21-94 



Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 12 Stonehedge Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 18 & 18F) 



Case 22-94 
Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acq[uire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 11 Stonehedge Drive. 
(Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 18 & 18F) 



Granted 



Case 23-94 
Doherty-Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located at Lot 9 Stonehedge Drive. 
Assessor's Map 17 Parcel 18 & 18F) 



Granted 



Case 24-94 
Earl & Patricia 

Ellsworth 
Forest Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a 
lot having insufficient frontage and width 
for a single family dwelling for property 
located on Forest Street. 
(Assessor's Map 7 Parcel pt 30B) 



Case 25-94 
Richard Thebeau 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 to allow 
an existing dwelling to remain as situated on 
a pre-existing lot for property located on 
West Street. (Assessor's Map 73 Parcel pt 6) 



Granted 



Case 26-94 
Richard Thebeau 
c/o D. Brown 
5 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- ( 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws Sec. 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 for a 
pre-existing lot having insufficient setbacks 
and width for property located on Ayotte Street. 
(Assessor's Map 73 Parcel pt 6) 



Case 27-94 
Unai Garabieta 
31 Boutwell St. 



To accjuire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing a haunmerhead lot for property 
located at 31 Boutwell Street. (Assessor's 
Map 19 Parcel 36) 



Granted 



-72- 



Case 28-94 
Albert & Eileen 

Clark 
76 Holland Rd 
Wakefield 



Case 29-94 
Dolores LaVita 
8 Andrew St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 

of the Zoning Bylaws to allow paved 

frontage to be reduced from 120 feet to 48 

feet due to the presence of wetlands for 

property located on Auburn Avenue. 

(Assessor's Map 32 Parcel 100) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for 

a lot having insufficient side yard setback 

(frontage on Medford Avenue) for property 

located on 8 Andrew Street. (Assessor's Map 

9 Parcel 78) 



Case 30-94 
4th of July 
Committee 



To acquire a special permit for a carnival 
during the week of the Fourth of July Celebra- 
tion for property located on Church Street. 
(Assessor's Map 63 Parcel 10) 



Granted 



Case 31-94 
Robert Peterson 
314 Main St 



Case 32-94 
Linehan Fam Tr 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Mackey Road. (Assessor's Map 62 
Parcel 45 & 47) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Dadant Drive. (Assessor's Map 
78 Parcel pt 15) 



Granted 



Granted 



Case 33-94 
Linehan Fam Tr 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



Case 34-94 
Richard & Anita 

Gottschalk 
32 Westdale Ave 



Case 35-94 
Sharon Breault 
30 Bay Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 

to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 

located on Dadant Drive. (Assessor's Map 

78 Parcel pt 15) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 

of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 

insufficient aide and rear yard setbacks for 

an in-ground swimming pool for property 

located at 32 Westdale Avenue. (Assessor's 

Map 57 Parcel 66) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
for a lot having insufficient side yard set- 
back for an above-ground pool for property 
located at 30 Bay Street. (Assessor's Map 
49 Parcel 30) 



Case 36-94 
Mediplex Group 
764 Woburn St 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with the Zoning Bylaws Sec. 6.1.2.2 
to change, extend or alter a nonconforming 
use or structure (add 12 more beds) for 
property located at 764 Woburn Street. 
(Assessor's Map 57 Parcel 66) 



Granted 



Case 37-94 
Georgia Arbo 
One Jacobs St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 for a pre-existing lot having insuffi- 
cient area and depth for a single family 
dwelling for property located at Faulkner 
Ave. (Assessor's Map 69 Parcel 58) 



Granted 



-73- 



Case 38-94 
Dolores D. Lord 
Boutwell St 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing an alteration and extension of a 
nonconforming structure for property located 
on 2 Olney Avenue. (Assessor's Map 32 Parcel 
48) 



Granted 



Case 39-94 
Donald Sughrue 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 
of the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 
dwelling to remain as situated on a lot 
having insufficient frontage for property 
located on Floradale Avenue. (Assessor's 
Map 29 Parcel pt llA) 



Granted 



Case 40-94 
Donald Sughrue 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To accjuire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 
and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot 
having insufficient frontage and width for 
a single family dwelling for property located 
on Lot 2 Floradale Avenue. (Assessor's Map 
29 Parcel pt llA) 



Case 41-94 
Laura Miller 
c/o R. Peterson 



To acc[uire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3,4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Marion Street. (Assessor's Map 
5 Parcel 3) 



Granted 



Case 42-94 
Jared Wentzell 
145 Grove Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) to allow the 
existing dwelling and deck to remain as 
situated on a lot for property located at 
145 Grove Avenue. (Assessor's Map 34 
Parcel 76) 



Withdrawn 



Case 43-94 
Gerard J. Smith 
11 South St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having in- 
sufficient rear yard setback for an addi- 
tion for property located on 11 South Street, 
(Assessor's Map 35 Parcel 16) 



Granted 



Case 44-94 To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 

Doreen DeCourcey sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 and 

7 McDonald Rd 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow 

the existing dwelling, garage and deck to 
remain as situated on the lot for property 
located at 7 McDonald Road. (Assessor's Map 
84 Parcel 85) 



Granted 



Case 45-94 
Joseph DiNatale 
45 McDonald Rd 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.2.5 and 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning 
Bylaws for a lot with insufficient side 
yard setback for a pool for property 
located on 45 McDonald Road. (Assessor's 
Map 84 Parcel 63) 



Granted 



Case 46-94 
Joseph & Richard 

Brown 
29 Melrose Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
for a lot having insufficient front yard 
setback for a single family dwelling for 
property located at 19 Cedar Street. 
(Assessor's Map 30 Parcel 67) 



Granted 



-74- 



Case 47-94 
Vincent Scifo 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot 
having insufficient area, frontage, width, 
front, rear and side yard setbacks for a 
single family dwelling for property located 
on Fourth Avenue. (Assessor's Map 11 Parcel 
58D) 



Granted 



Case 48-94 
Rose Scifo 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3,5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot 
having insufficient area, frontage, width, 
front, rear and side yard setbacks for a 
single family dwelling for property located 
on Hopkins Street. (Assessor's Map 11 
Parcel 58D) 



Granted 



Case 49-94 
Robert Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area and 
width for a single family dwelling for pro- 
perty located on Rhodes Street. (Assessor's 
Map 54 Parcel 60) 



Granted 



Case 50-94 
Robert Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area and 
width for a single feimily dwelling for pro- 
perty located on Rhodes Street. (Assessor's 
Map 54 Parcel 60) 



Granted 



Case 51-94 
Robert Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area and 
width for a single family dwelling for pro- 
perty located on Rhodes Street. (Assessor's 
Map 54 Parcel 60) 



Withdrawn 



Case 52-94 
Mark Lopez 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 for 
a lot having insufficient frontage for a 
single family dwelling for property located 
on Birchwood Road. (Assessor's Map 81 
Parcel 28A) 



Granted 



Case 53-94 
I.Fred DiCenso 
45 Beulah St 
Framingham 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.5.15 (Auto Repair and Body Shop) 
of the Zoning Bylaws for property located 
at 65 Industrial Way. (Assessor's Map 56 
Parcel 122) 



Granted 



Case 54-94 
Michael Russo 
16A Fairfield Rd 



To appeal the decision of the Building 
Inspector - Sec. 4.1.6 of the Zoning 
Bylaws - and to allow the parking of a 
commercial vehicle in a residential zone 
for property located on 16A Fairfield Rd. 
(Assessor's Map 55 Parcel 160) 



Denied 



Case 55-94 
Richard A. 

Capistran 
16 Buckingham 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws to allow an exist- 
ing dwelling to remain as situated within 
the front yard setback on Cambridge Avenue 
and for a deck to be no closer than 15 feet 
from the rear yard lot line for property 
located on 16 Buckinghcim Street. (Assessor's 
Map 9 Parcel 64A) 



Granted 



-75- 



Case 56-94 
Victor S. 

Dellisola 
12 Cambridge Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having in- 
sufficient side and rear yard setback for 
a deck for property located on 12 Cambridge 
Avenue. (Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 64B) 



Case 57-94 
Paul Richardson 
155 West Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.4.1 (Parking), 3.6.1 (Warehouse) 
and 3.6.2 (Bulk Material Storage & Sales) of 
the Zoning Bylaws for temporary relief 
on parking in a General Industrial Zone and 
storage of cement barriers (tunnel segments) 
for property located at 375 Ballardvale St. 
(Assessor's Map R3 Parcel 50A) 



Case 58-94 
Paul Richardson 
155 West Street 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.4.1 (Parking), 3.6.1 (Warehouse) 
and 3.6.2 (Bulk Material Storage & Sales) of 
the Zoning Bylaws for temporary relief 
on parking in a General Industrial Zone and 
storage of cement barriers (tunnel segments) 
for property located at 155 West Street. 
(Assessor's Map 56 Parcel 3B) 



Granted 



Case 59-94 

L. Levine 

c/o R. Peterson 

314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 of the Zoning 
Bylaws to allow a single family dwelling to 
remain as situated on a lot having insuffi- 
cient area, frontage, lot width, front and 
side yard setbacks for property located on 
9 Cobalt Street. (Assessor's Map 83 Parcel 
24) 



Case 60-94 

L. Levine 

c/o R. Peterson 

314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 of the Zoning 
Bylaws for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage, lot width and front yard setbacks 
for a single family dwelling for property 
located at 9 Cobalt Street. (Assessor's 
Map 83 Parcel 24) 



Denied 



Case 61-94 
Anna Clinton 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To accjuire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 
area, frontage, lot width, side and rear 
yard setbacks for a single family dwelling 
for property located on Cross Street. 
(Assessor's Map 40 Parcel 143) 



Granted 



Case 62-94 
John Randall 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main Street 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 
porch to remain as situated within the 
required side yard setback for property 
located at 23 Miller Road. (Assessor's 
Map 55 Parcel 113) 



Granted 



Case 63-94 

N . E . Development 

20 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.3 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having in- 
sufficient width for a single family dwell- 
ing for property located on Lot 1 Chestnut St, 
(Assessor's Map 14 Parcel 5) 



Granted 



-76- 



Case 64-94 
N.E. Development 
20 Middlesex Ave 



Case 65-94 
N.E. Development 
20 Middlesex Ave 



Case 66-94 
John St Joan 

Dineen 
11 Dorothy Ave 



Case 67-94 
H. Varallo 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



Case 68-94 
Gary Lucas 
586 Main St. 



Case 69-94 
Brian Goode 
35 Burnap St. 



Case 70-94 

I. Fred DiCenso 

45 Beulah St. 

Framinghcun 



Case 71-94 
Fred & Linda 

Brassil 
6 Christine Dr. 



Case 72-94 
Paul K. Butt 
3 Kilmarnock St 



Case 73-94 
Paul K. Butt 
3 Kilmarnock St 



To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot 2 Chestnut Street. 
(Assessor's Map 14 Parcel 5) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 

to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 

located on Lot 3 Chestnut Street. 

(Assessor's Map 14 Parcel 5) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
and 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow the 
existing dwelling to remain as situated within 
the front yard setback and for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a deck and 
garage for property located on 11 Dorothy Ave. 
(Assessor's Map 90 Parcel 96) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing the alteration or extension of a 
nonconforming structure for property located 
on King Street. (Assessor's Map 67 Parcel 59) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 (Accessory Use-Snack Shop) 
of the Zoning Bylaws for property located on 
586 Main Street. (Assessor's Map 40 Parcel 5) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having in- 
sufficient frontage for a single family 
dwelling for property located on Wightman St. 
(Assessor's Map 34 Parcel 52/53) 

To accjuire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 3.5.15 (Auto Repair & Body Shop) 
and 6.4 (Parking) expansion of parking lot; 
revision of prior approved special permit for 
expanded parking lot for Case 97-92 - due to 
existing ledge for property located on 65 
Industrial Way. (Assessor's Map 56 Parcel 
122) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for an addi- 
tion for property located on 6 Christine Dr. 
(Assessor's Map 53 Parcel 14D) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot 5 Woburn Street. (Assessor's 
Map 86 parcel 11A,12A,12B) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 

to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 

located on Lot 2 Woburn Street. (Assessor's 

Map 86 Parcel 11A,12A,12B) 



-77- 



Case 74-94 
Robert Scoville 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 
deck to remain as situated within the rear 
yard setback for property located at 30 
Morningside Drive. (Assessor's Map 70 Parcel 
44) 



Granted 



Case 75-94 
Raymond Stevens 
10 Mystic Ave 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for 
a lot having insufficient side and rear yard 
setback for an above-ground pool for property 
located on 10 Mystic Avenue. (Assessor's Map 
79 Parcel 38) 



Granted 



Case 76-94 
Fred Murray 
10 Linda Road 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side and rear yard setback for 
a garage for property located on 10 Linda 
Road. (Assessor's Map 88 Parcel 23A) 



Granted 



Case 77-94 
A. Cammarata 
82 Swain Road 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing an alteration and extension of 
a nonconforming structure for property 
located at 82 Swain Road. (Assessor's 
Map 7 Parcel 96) 



Granted 



Case 78-94 
William F. Butt 
6 West Street 



To accpjire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
to authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot A Woburn Street. (Assessor's 
Map 86 Parcel 14) 



Granted 



Case 79-94 
William F. Butt 
6 West Street 



Case 80-94 
Patricia Agati 
299 Woburn St 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot B Woburn Street. (Assessor's 
Map 86 Parcel 14) 

To accpjire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 4.2.7 (Accessory Apartment- 
Addition) subject to Sec. 8.3.2 and 8.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for property located at 
299 Woburn Street. (Assessor's Map 86 
Parcel 8H) 



Granted 



Case 81-94 

C. Eckelkamp 

14 Cambridge Ave 



To acquire a variance from Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insuffi- 
cient rear yard setback for a deck for 
property located on 14 Csunbridge Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 9 Parcel 64C) 



Case 82-94 
Joseph Croft 
c/o D. Brown 
11 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.3 
and 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow 
the existing dwelling to remain as situated 
within a lot having insufficient area, width 
and setbacks for property located on Jones 
Ave. (Assessor's Map 55 Parcel pt 33) 



Granted 



Case 83-94 
James F. Kay 
Boyle St. 



To acquire a variance from Sec. 5.2.5 of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 
side yard setback for a shed for property 
located on 3 Boyle Street. (Assessor's Map 
11 Parcel 36B) 



Granted 



-78- 



Case 84-94 
Charles Mulik 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 85-94 
Charles Mulik 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Sec. 5.2.3 and 
5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow an 
existing dwelling to remain as situated on a 
lot having insufficient lot width and rear 
yard setback for property located on Hobson 
Ave. (Assessor's Map 45 Parcel 18,19,20) 

To acc[uire a variance from Sec. 5.2.3 of the 
Zoning Bylaws for a lot having insufficient 
lot width for a single family dwelling for 
property located on Dewey Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 45 Parcel 18,19,20) 



Withdrawn 



Withdrawn 



Case 86-94 
Robert Butters 
40 Middlesex Ave 



To accjuire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.1 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing an alteration and extension of a 
nonconforming structure (shed) for property 
located at 40 Middlesex Avenue. (Assessor's 
Map 42 Parcel 34) 



Granted 



Case 87-94 
Jay Wentzell 
Swain Road 



Case 88-94 
Jay Wentzell 
Swain Road 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.3.4 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
authorize a hammerhead lot for property 
located on Lot 2, 7 Congress Street. 
(Assessor's Map 7 Parcel 26) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) of the 
Zoning Bylaws, Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3, to 
allow an existing dwelling to remain on a 
lot having insufficient frontage and width 
for property located on Lot 1, 7 Congress 
Street. (Assessor's Map 7 Parcel 26) 



Granted 



Granted 



Case 89-94 
Robert Cabral 
c/o D. Brown 
5 Middlesex Ave 



To appeal the decision and order of the 
Inspector of Buildings contained in a 
letter to the applicants dated 6/30/94 
which states the applicant's property is 
in violation of the Zoning Bylaw but which 
fails to specify what part or section of 
the Bylaw has been violated for property 
located at 9 Burnap Street. (Assessor's 
Map 34 Parcel 134, 135, 136) 



Pending 



Case 90-94 
Kenneth & 
Susanne Clarkin 
39 Reno Rd 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for a 
lot having insufficient side/rear yard set- 
back for a pool for property located on 39 
Reno Rd. (Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 95) 



Granted 



Case 91-94 
Harvey Freeman 
160 Lowell St. 



Case 92-94 

Gary J. Masonick 

12 Fiorenza Dr. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
and 5.2.7 of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot 
having insufficient side yard setback for 
an addition and to extend maximum building 
coverage from 35% to 48% for property 
located on 160 Lowell Street. (Assessor's 
Map 49 Parcel 14) 

To acc[uire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 5.2.8.1 (freestanding amateur 
radio tower) for property located on 12 
Fiorenza Drive. (Assessor's Map R4 Parcel 
49) 



Pending 



Withdrawn 



-79- 



Case 93-94 

John Farffarello 

5 New Hampshire 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side and rear yard setback for 
a pool for property located on 5 New Hamp- 
shire Road. (Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 139) 



Granted 



Case 94-94 
Franks 

Enterprizes 
880 Main St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Section 3.5.1 (Retail Store) in a 
General Industrial Zone for property 
located on 880 Main Street. (Assessor's 
Map 38 Parcel 2) 



Granted 



Case 95-94 
Brian Sullivan 
151 Main St 



To acc[uire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side and rear yard setback for 
a deck for property located on 151 Main St. 
(Assessor's Map 45 Parcel 28) 



Granted 



Case 96-94 
Mark Fregeau 
42 Faulkner St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient front yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 42 Faulkner 
Avenue. (Assessor's Map 55 Parcel 94C) 



Case 97-94 
Robert Peterson 
41 Towpath Dr. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws to allow an existing 
pool and deck to remain as situated within 
the required side yard setbacks or property 
located at 41 Towpath Drive. (Assessor's 
Map 29 Parcel 48) 



Granted 



Case 98-94 
Thermo Electron- 

Tecomet 
115 Fames St. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 4.1.7.3 (Use of Trailers for 
Nonconstruction Storage) for property 
located at 115 Fames Street. (Assessor's 
Map 47 Parcel 10) 



Granted 



Case 99-94 
Eugene Sullivan 
10 Upton Dr. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for an 
aboveground storage containment area for 
property located at 312 Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 42 Parcel 25) 



Withdrawn 



Case 100-94 
Michele & Byron 

Kincaid 
3 Lynch Lane 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a single 
family dwelling for property located on 3 
Lynch Lane. (Assessor's Map 67 Parcel 45, 
46, 47, 48, pt 52C) 



Withdrawn 



Case 101-94 
Michael Newhouse 
5 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 6.1.2.2 of the Zoning Bylaws 
authorizing the alteration or extension 
of a nonconforming structure for property 
located on 42 Hanover Street. (Assessor's 
Map 51 Parcel 66) 



Granted 



Case 102-94 
Constantine 

Mourlas 
331 Main St 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.5.4 (Limited Service Restaurant) 
for property located on 331 Main Street. 
(Assessor's Map 42 Parcel 22E) 



Granted 



-80- 



Case 103-94 
Doris Cunningham 
4 Walker St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient front yard setback for a 
porch for property located on 4 Walker 
Street. (Assessor's Map 55 Parcel 237) 



Granted 



Case 104-94 
Janet O'Brien 
7 Sherwood Rd 



Case 105-94 
Hilda Hudson 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Granted 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 

of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 

insufficient side yard setback for an 

aboveground pool for property located on 

7 Sherwood Road. (Assessor's Map 8 Parcel 

15A) 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Withdrawn 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws for 

a lot having insufficient area, frontage 

and lot width for a single family dwelling 

for property located on Hobson Avenue. 

(Assessor's Map 44 Parcel 37,38) 



Case 106-94 
Hazel Guiffre 

c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St. 



Case 107-94 

Dispatch Commun- 
ications of NE 

Newton Upper 
Falls 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- Withdrawn 

sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 

5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws 

for a lot having insufficient area, frontage 

and lot width for a single family dwelling 

for property located on Wisser Street. 

(Assessor's Map 44 Parcel 37,38) 

To acquire a special permit in accordance Granted 

with Sec. 8.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to 

exceed the height as set forth in Sec. 

5.2.8.1 by allowing the replacement of a 

120' lattice radio tower with a 130' 

lattice radio tower for property located 

at 773 Salem Street. (Assessor's Map Rl 

Parcel 23) 



Case 108-94 To acquire a variance in accordance 

Dispatch Commun- with Sec. 6.1.1 and 6.1.2 of the Zoning 

ications of NE Bylaws to allow the continuation of an 

Newton Upper existing use, i.e. replacing a 120 foot 

Falls radio tower (140' with antenna) on a pre- 

existing nonconforming lot for property 
located on 773 Salem Street. (Assessor's 
Map Rl Parcel 23) 



Granted 



Case 109-94 
JRMC, Inc. 
d/b/a Pizza Mia 
362 Middlesex Ave 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 3.5.4 of the Zoning Bylaws 
(Limited Service Restaurant - 20 seats) for 
property located at 362 Middlesex Avenue. 
(Assessor's Map 89 Parcel 6A) 



Granted 



Case 110-94 
Wayne S. Gabree 
15 South St. 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 of 
the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for an 
addition for property located on 15 South 
Street. (Assessor's Map 35 Parcel 15) 



Granted 



Case 111-94 
Robert Carter 
118 Andover St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a garage 
for property located on 118 Andover Street. 
(Assessor's Map 103 Parcel 9) 



Granted 



-81- 



case 112-94 
Charles Tynan 
64 Forest St 



Case 113-94 
Edith Kindred 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St 



Case 114-94 
Francis & Isabel 

Sf errazza 
c/o R. Peterson 
314 Main St 



To accpiire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 
and 5.2.5 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
construct an addition to a single family 
dwelling within the required front and 
rear yard setbacks for property located 
at 64 Forest Street. (Assessor's Map 7 
Parcel 138) 

To acquire a spjecial permit under Sec. 
4.2.7 of the Zoning Bylaws to construct 
an accessory apartment to a single family 
dwelling at 18 Jere Road. (Assessor's 
Map 36 Parcel 22) 

To acquire a special permit under Sec. 
4.2.7 of the Zoning Bylaws to construct 
an accessory apartment to a single family 
dwelling at 31 Fairmeadow Road. 
(Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 44) 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case 115-94 
Apkar Albert 

Bartigian 
74 Brandon St 
Cranston RI 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1, 
5.2.2 and 5.2.3 of the Zoning Bylaws to 
construct a single family dwelling on a 
lot having insufficient area, frontage and 
lot width for property located on Vermont 
Rd. (Assessor's Map 36 Parcel 138) 



Granted 



Case 116-96 
Harry L. See 
14 Lee St 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 
of the Zoning Bylaws for a lot having 
insufficient side yard setback for a garage 
for property located on 14 Lee Street. 
(Assessor's Map 67 Parcel 71A) 



Granted 



Case 117-94 
Kenneth Batten 
10 Rollins Rd 



To acquire a special permit in accordance 
with Sec. 4.2.7 (Accessory Apartments- 
Addition and lot size) subject to Sec. 
8.3.2 and 8.5 of the Zoning Bylaws for 
property located on 10 Rollins Road. 
(Assessor's Map 16 Parcel 63A) 



Granted 



Case 118-94 
M.J. Connolly 
319A Andover St 



To acquire a special permit under Sec. 
3.6.6 (Heavy Vehicular Dealership and 
Repair Garage) of the Zoning Bylaws to 
allow for the use of heavy vehicular 
repair garage and further for the storage 
of same for property located at 319A 
Andover Street. (Assessor's Map Rl Parcel 
118) 



Granted 



Case 119-94 
Sherwood Oil 
61 Forest St 
Arlington 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 for 
a lot having insufficient area for a single 
family dwelling for property located on Lot 
A Naples Rd. (Assessor's Map 41 Parcel 137C) 



Granted 



Case 120-94 
Sherwood Oil 
61 Forest St 
Arlington 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimen- 
sional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 for 
a lot having insufficient area for a single 
family dwelling for property located on Lot 
B Naples Rd. (Assessor's Map 41 Parcel 137B) 



Granted 



-82- 



Council for the Arts 



In 1994, the Wilmington Council for the Arts again sponsored programs that 
were an enrichment to the cultural life of the Town of Wilmington and its 
residents. From its lovely and historic center, for generations known as the 
"Old Town Hall," now the Center for the Arts, events ranging from a "Holiday 
Celebration" in December to a Coffeehouse in October were offered. Art 
exhibitions and demonstrations, concerts and arts classes, acting and dance 
classes, and the establishment of a youth chorus by Mr. David Fuller, received 
enthusiastic support from townspeople. 

The Wilmington Council is, in part, supported by the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council whose purpose is to raise funds to be used for community arts. 
Budgetary restrictions have curtailed monetary allocations from both the state 
and town so that now the Wilmington Council offers grants and PASS (Performing 
Arts Students Series Program) awards only once a year, replacing the two 
cycles of some years ago. For 1994, the Council distributed some $3,500 in 
grants and PASS awards to applicants. In addition, passes for the Museum of 
Fine Arts and the Gardner Museum were presented to the Memorial Library. 

Weekly music rehearsals by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of "Sweet Adelines" 
continue in the Arts Center. 



exhibition and greet old friends. Jane Crane won the John D. Brooks award for 
her watercolor entitled "My Grandfather's Farm." This recognition is given to 
the Wilmington artist who has shown the most promise and progress in his/her 
work. The Council agreed to the purchase of Mrs. Crane's work to add to its 
permanent acquisitions. In Oils/Acrylics, Leda Sullivan won first prize, 
Stephen S. Greco won second prize and third prize was won by Leona Bombard. A 
merit award was given to Philip A. MacKencie, Jr. Elaine Bradley won both 
first and second prizes in Watercolor, third prize went to Luke Volpe, and a 
merit award was given to Gertrude Donovan. In a category titled "Other," 
David Maison won first prize for his painting done in Watercolor/Ink. Mary 
Chappell won second prize and a merit award. Lexie Donahue won third prize in 
this category. In the Students' Exhibition (students in arts classes 
sponsored by the Council and taught by Louise Anderson of North Reading), 
first prize was won by Robyn Caseley, second prize by Jane Crane, and third 
prize by Ruth Camber. A merit award was given to Ruth Myers Laider. In 
Photography, Michael Hubley won first prize, Barrett S. Bacall received second 
prize, and Maryellen Cole won both third prize and a merit award. 

The "Most Popular" award went to Elaine Bradley. Three well-known artists 
judged the show. 




Noted Gloucester Artist Bernard Gertsner demonstratinf; w aiercolonng. 



The Fourteenth 
Annual Art 
Exhibition held 
on Saturday and 
Sunday, June 25 
and 26, 1994 was 
an outstanding 
success both 
from the 
standpoint of 
paintings 
exhibited and 
the attendance 
of over 250 
people. This 
show has become 
a tradition in 
the summer 
season in 
Wilmington. 
Many former 
residents return 
to visit the 



-83- 



JOANN BAKER of Wilmington, an award-winning member of the Rhode Island School 
of Photography and of the Rhode Island Professional Photographers (Best of 
Show and Court of Honor). 

JOAN COLT HOOPER of Marblehead, award-winning artist of many juried shows who 
has held nine one-artist shows, winning numerous awards. Her interest in the 
sea inspires her to portray its luminescence in oil. 

WILLIAM ST. GEORGE, host of the TV show "Impressions," is a well-known painter 
of landscapes, seascapes and portraits. He has exhibited from New England to 
California and is a member of the Copley Society, Boston, and the Canton and 
Milton Art Societies. 

The professional hanging of the exhibition was done by David Maison, Chairman 
of the Arts Council, and by member Bruce Jope and Joe Maison, brother of 
David. 

One of the most delightful programs ever presented at the Arts Center was 
entitled, "Our Holiday Celebration," held on Saturday afternoon, December 17, 
1994. Young dancers and vocalists, solos and duets, and a sing-along under 
the enthusiastic direction of Carolyn Stanhope indeed made the afternoon a 
happy celebration. The young dancers were students of Renee Assetta, local 
dance instructor. 

The youth chorus sponsored by the Council under the able instruction of David 
Fuller gave a spirited performance. It was a treatment to Mr. Fuller's 
professional expertise in training these 38 young voices. Four painting 
demonstrations were held during the year. In February, Saugus artist William 
J. Maloney, a professional painter for over 40 years, demonstrated in oils 
showing a new artistic "tool" he has developed: the use of videos as a source 
for painting. In this he keeps a clean image on the television for as long as 
he needs it. 

In April, a demonstration in the art of watercolor by the distinguished 
Winchester artist, Carolyn Latanision was held. Watching this world-renowned 
artist work was enjoyable and enlightening to her large audience. The 
painting demonstrated that evening now hangs in the Art Center. 

Later in April, a demonstration in gouache was provided by the North Shore 
artist, Anne Krapish of Danvers. The demonstration was greatly enjoyed by an 
appreciative audience. 

A snow scene in watercolor was demonstrated in November by the celebrated 
Gloucester artist, Bernard Gerstner. Mr. Gerstner's presentation provided an 
evening of great pleasure to the enthusiastic spectators. 

At the Jazz 
Coffeehouse by 
the Mill City 
Jazz Band of 
Andover held in 
October, the 
event like its 
predecessor of a 
year ago, played 
to a SRO 
audience. 
Coffee and 
refreshments 
were provided at 
individual 
tables . 

The two 
watercolor 
classes taught 
each week again 
had full 
enrollment. 



-84- 




Two new types of instruction were provided during 1994 for young people. 
Acting classes for children in grades three to eight were taught by Judith 
Durkee of Wilmington who has a teaching degree from Wheelock College and is a 
professional actress in Boston. 

Dance classes for young people were offered during the summer. These were 
under the direction of Renee Assetta, a local dance teacher. In conformance 
with Art Council policy, all classes were offered at a very minimal fee. 

The Council wishes to thank the town departments for their generous 
assistance. 

Officers of the Council for the Arts are: David Maison, Chairman; Elizabeth 
White, Assistant Chairman; Anne Buzzell, Treasurer; Recording Secretary, Jane 
Crane; Frances Keough, Corresponding Secretary/Publicity. 

The Council appreciates the support of the people of Wilmington, the Board of 
Selectmen and the Town Manager. 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Throughout the year, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) has been 
representing the interest of the communities in the region on a number of 
critical planning issues. MAPC sponsored a workshop for local officials in 
September on how to get projects on the Transportation Improvement Program 
(TIP) . MAPC also reviewed the Environmental Impact Report for the Industri- 
Plex interchange. As part of MetroPlan 2000 activities, MAPC staff worked to 
develop a plan for the Industri-Plex CDC (concentrated development center) 
located in Wilmington and Woburn. MAPC also provided information and 
sponsored public information meetings on the proposed changes to the state's 
Title V regulations on wastewater disposal. MAPC's legislative activities 
included a major effort on both the transportation and open space bond bills. 
A new initiative was Local Net, an electronic bulletin board system for local 
governments. Local Net is a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association. MAPC assisted member communities in taking advantage 
of the free software licenses and provided technical assistance to get 
communities connected to Local Net. 

Wilmington continued to be an active participant in the North Suburban 
Planning Council (NSPC). North Suburban Planning Council is one of eight MAPC 
subregions developed to foster inter-town communication and cooperation. The 
two major areas of activity for this year were transportation and legislation. 
The NSPC provided input into the development of the Transportation Improvement 
Program and the Unified Planning Work Program. In addition, the subregion 
worked with Central Transportation Planning Staff on the public participation 
process for the update of the regional transportation plan. In cooperation 
with MAPC, the NSPC developed a scope of work for a study of circumferential 
transit. The subregion spent considerable time reviewing the "Growing Smart" 
legislation proposed by 1000 Friends of Massachusetts as well as reviewing and 
commenting on several bills that affected the way local planning boards 
operate. The subregion sponsored a legislative breakfast in January that was 
well-attended despite heavy snow. 

North Suburban Planning Council also participated in the subregional 
evaluation process that took place this year. Several meetings were spent 
discussing and filling out the subregional evaluation form. Two NSPC members 
participated in MAPC's subregional retreat held at Brandeis. As a result of 
the retreat, the subregion developed and submitted a proposal for the 
additional funding being made available to the subregions. 

Another area of interest was economic development. Economic development 
officials were invited to a meeting featuring a representative of the Greater 
Boston Manufacturing Partnership. The subregion also reviewed data from the 
vacant sites survey. 



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Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the Bylaws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully 
submit the Annual Report on the activities of the Wilmington Department of 
Public Works for the year 1994. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, 
Cemetery, Parks & Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. The coordinating of 
all the activities of all divisions allows the town the optimum use of 
manpower, equipment and materials which control cost. 



HIGHWAY Division (658-4481) 



All regular 
highway 

maintenance work 
was carried out 
during the year, 
such as sweeping 
streets, 
installing 
street and 
warning signs, 
patching 
streets, 
cleaning catch 
basins, cutting 
brush along the 
roadsides, 
picking up trash 
along our 
roadsides, 
painting and 
replacing 
guardrails, 
repairing broken 
curbing, painting 




Ongoing clean-up by Department of Public Works. 



safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 



Sidewalk Construction; The Town Meeting appropriated $61,280 for sidewalk 
construction. The two areas of sidewalk construction were High Street, from 
Middlesex Avenue to the Woburn Street School and Wildwood Street, from Woburn 
Street to just east of the Maple Meadow Brook. These sidewalks will improve 
public." safety for school children who walk to school and will expand the 
existing network of sidewalks that are available to the residents. 

The sidewalk construction projects are about 90% completed and passable. The 
finish coat of hot top, pole relocation and landscaping work will be completed 
in the spring. 



Safety Projects; The intersection of Wildwood Street & Woburn Street and 
Nichols Street at the Tewksbury line were improved to allow for safer traffic 
flow. 



Chapter 90 Improvements; Finish course of hot top was applied on West Street 
from Woburn Street to Lowell Street and Middlesex Avenue from Town Common to 
Route 38. A binder course and finish course was applied to the following 
streets: Federal Street, Marie Drive, Sheridan Road, Chapman Avenue and West 
Street from Lowell Street to the Reading Line. 

Binder course only was applied on the following streets: Roosevelt Road, Taft 
Road, Clark Street and Railroad Avenue. The finish course will be applied in 
the spring. 



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Drainage; Drainage ditches, systems and culverts were installed, repaired or 
extended at the following locations: Roosevelt Road, Chestnut Street, Fay 
Street, Lee Street, Gunderson Road, Reed Street, Molloy Road, Old Shawsheen 
Avenue, Glen Road, Pinewood Road, Middlesex Avenue, Radcliff Road, Coolidge 
Road, Concord Street, Burnap Street, School Street, Clark Street, Molloy Road, 
High Street, Adams Street, Allen Park Drive, Cleveland Avenue and West Street 
at Industrial Way. 

The Department of Public Works also assisted the stream maintenance "Clean Up 
Day" volunteers by cleaning up the debris that the volunteers removed from the 
brooks and streams throughout town. Many thanks to the volunteers for a job 
well done. 




Department of Public Works personnel work to remove snow after a major snowstorm. 



Snow S Ice Removal; The Highway Division recorded 78.0 " of snow. Snow & ice 
removal is a very expensive and major function of the Department of Public 
Works in trying to keep our roads free from ice and snow and as safe as 
possible during the winter months. 



-87- 



TREE DIVISION (658-2809) 



The Tree 

Division carried 
out all regular 
maintenance work 
such as 
trimming, 
cutting, 
spraying and 
tree removal. 
We removed 48 
roadside trees 
that were dead 
or interfered 
with public 
safety. Hornet 
nests were 
removed upon 
request from 
residents. The 
Town Common was 
illuminated 
again this year 
with a fine 
display of 
Christmas 
lights. 

Dutch Elm 
Disease; We 
removed 6 Dutch 
Elm diseased trees. 




Department of Public Works personnel hang lights in preparation of Wilmington 's annual 
display of Christmas lights on the Town Common. 



Mosquito Control; The town is a member of the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control Project. With this regional approach we are able to provide our town 
with good, environmentally sound and coat effective mosquito control. The 
three basic mosquito control methods are source reduction, larviciding and 
adulticiding. 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 



All regular maintenance work wat 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, 
monuments were poured, etc. 



carried out throughout the year, such as 
resetting grave markers, foundations for 



Burials 



Receipts 



Died in Wilmington 
Died Elsewhere 
Non-Residents 
Cremations 
Infants 



24 
67 
52 
19 

6 

168 



Interments 
Foundations for 

monuments 
Affidavits 
Copies of Deeds 



$39, 173.00 
$4,457.65 

$2.00 
572.00 
$43,704.69 



Reserve 



Sale of Lots 



$33,552.00 

Total 



Trust Fund 
Perpetual Care 
$106,207.69 



$28,951.00 



-88- 



Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, marking ballfields for baseball, softball, football, 
field hockey and soccer. Also, all fields and parks were fertilized. 

The girls softball field at the High School has been completed. 

Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions 
with engineering related projects, such as, but not limited to: 

Highway Division - With solution to drainage problems and other engineering 
related work. 

Planning Board - Subdivisions - Reviewed subdivision plans and made 
recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction. 

Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 

The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works. If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

I am pleased to report that the townwide residential curbside recycling 
program has been a great success. The homeowners should be congratulated for 
their participation in this program. Keep up the good work I 




Members of the Department of Public Works after receiving "Safe Driver" awards. 



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Water & Sewer Division (658-4711) 



Water: Michael J. Woods was appointed in July as the new Water and Sewer 
Superintendent . 

Jonathan Goldfield resigned from the Water and Sewer Commission. Mr. Goldfield 
has moved from Wilmington. We wish to thank Jonathan for his dedicated service 
while on the Commission. Edwin P. Tripp, III was appointed to replace him. 

The first phase of the Graphic Information System was completed and is being 
utilized by the Department. This system will eventually have all the old 
drawings and maps showing the water and sewer system in an electronic format. 

Water Protection Services, Inc. continues to test and administer the cross 
connection control program for the Department. We are actively pursuing all 
violations to bring them into compliance. 

Tutella Engineering Associates was awarded a contract for the design of a new 
vault and altitude valve at the Nassau Avenue Storage Tank. This will give the 
department more flexibility on how it operates the water treatment plants. It 
will also significantly reduce the chance of overflowing this water tower if a 
malfunction occurs in the system. 

An engineering study was performed on the Industrial Way pressure boosting 
station by Camp, Dresser and Mckee. The recommendation made in this study will 
modernize the station as well as allowing the department to monitor the 
station's operation. The installation of the station's new safety features 
should be completed by the spring of 1995. 

During the month of May a comprehensive water main flushing and valve 
exercising program was performed. This program aids in removing sediments in 
the water mains, identifies which fire hydrants need repairs and helps insure 
that the water gates in the system remain in good working condition. Needed 
repairs on the identified broken hydrants and water gates are also performed 
during this time period. 

The lead and copper testing program is continuing in accordance with the 
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) regulations. Sixty homes as well 
as two public schools were sampled and tested. Only five of the residential 
properties were found to exceed the federal limit for lead which is 0.015 
mg/L. None of the samples exceeded the federal limit for copper. 

Because ninety percent of the test results were less than the federal limit, 
the town's water system is in compliance with the lead and copper rule. DEP 
has now reduced the number of test sites to thirty plus the two public schools 
for future monitoring. 

We wish to thank all of the residents who helped us by participating in this 
program and providing us with water samples from their homes. 

The water rate for 1994 remained at $2.83 per 100 cubic feet of water used. 
One hundred cubic feet of water is equal to 748 gallons. 

The Department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
Town. 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day: The Department held a very 
successful Hazardous Household Waste Collection Day in October. Approximately 
600 cars brought hazardous waste to be disposed of. 

Sewer: The sewer pump station located on Industrial Way was refurbished. This 
station is now operating properly and is in good working condition. 



-90- 



The sewer pump station located in Shawsheen River Estates began operation in 
December. This station will become property of the Town at a later date. This 
pump station is the first step in bringing sewer to the west side of Town. 

The Water and Sewer Commission reduced the sewer rate from $4.27 to $3.92 per 
one hundred cubic feet of water used. 



Pumping Statistics; 

Maximum Gallons Per Day 4,233,000 

Maximum Gallons Per Week 25,725,100 

Maximum Gallons Per Month 106,624,800 

Average Gallons Per Day 2,502,569 

Average Gallons Per Month 76,119,808 

Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 913,437,690 

Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 1,009,417,000 

Precipitation Statistics; 

Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 44.92' 

Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 78.00' 

Consumption Statistics; 

Residential Use (Gallons)* 430,870,567 

Percentage of Total Pumped 47% 

Industrial Use (Gallons) 286,851,732 

Percentage of Pumped 32% 

Total Metered Use (Gallons) 717,722,299 

Percentage of Total Pumped 79% 

Unaccounted for Use (Gallons) 195,715,391 

Percentage of Total Pumped 21% 



* Residential use includes all residences and small commercial users using 5/8 
inch meters. 



**The difference between water pumped and water metered represents unaccounted 
for water use and consists of water used for flushing mains, main breaks, 
fighting fires, street sweeping, etc. 



Water Distribution System; 



The following new water mains were constructed in 1994: 



Location 


Length 


Size 


Hydrar 


Pouliot Place 


2,800' 


8" 


7 


Pembroke Street 


225' 


8" 


1 


Fames Street 


550' 


10" ' 





Castle Drive 


1,350' 


8" 


2 


Magazine Drive 


140' 


8" 


1 


Stonehedge Drive 


1,385' 


8" 


4 


Buckingham Street Ext. 


630' 


8" 


3 


Ogunquit Road 


194' 


8" 


1 


Flynn Way 


600' 


8" 


1 


Dewey Avenue 


600' 


6" 


1 


Agostino Drive 


800' 


8" 


2 


King Street Ext. 


200' 


6" 


1 


Faulkner Avenue 


200' 


8" 


1 



Total water mains installed in 1994 were 550 feet of 10 inch, 8,324 feet of 8 
inch and 800 feet of 6 inch. There were 25 hydrants and 164 services 
installed. 



-91- 



Sewerage Collection System; 



The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 1994: 



Location 



Length 



Size 



Brattle Street 
Reading Avenue 
Faulkner Avenue 



Pouliot Place 
Dewey Avenue 



1,500' 



255' 
250' 
150' 
150' 



10" 
8" 
8" 
8" 
8" 



Pouliot Place 
Pouliot Place 
Magazine Road 



1,300' 
1,300' 
200' 



3" 
6" 
2" 



forced main 
forced main 
forced main 



Total sewer laterals installed in 1994 were 5,105 feet. There were 70 sewer 
services connected to the system. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Police Department for keeping us informed during the winter months of the road 
conditions, between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 a.m. weekdays, weekends 
and holidays and all various departments for their cooperation extended during 
the year. I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Assistant Town Manager 
and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last but 
not least, to the employees of the Department of Public Works who made 1994 a 
very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Reflecting on the school year 1994-1995, the high school is proud of its 
faculty and students and their accomplishments. The number of students 
applying and being accepted to two and four year colleges has increased from 
the previous year. The girls' softball team won back-to-back state 
championships, a feat no other team has accomplished in Wilmington High School 
history. 

The citizens of Wilmington by now know of the Education Reform Law of 1993 and 
its implications for all students within the system, especially those enrolled 
at the High School. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Geraldine O'Donnell, Superintendent of Schools, 
many new initiatives have begun, dealing with all aspects of the educational 
delivery system. School Advisory Councils in each school have been chosen and 
are now functioning in every dimension as advisors to the principals of each 
school. Initiatives in budgeting curriculum revision, supervision and 
evaluation, inclusion, restructuring the school day and elimination of the 
general track, are just a few of the ongoing activities now occurring at the 
High School. 

The administration and faculty have written grant applications to help support 
and fund some of the above. On a daily basis, the high school's academic 
community attempts to provide the best possible education to the children of 
Wilmington. 



Wilmington Public Schools 



-92- 



The Science Department has 
been actively involved in 
curriculum evaluation and 
assessment to insure that 
our academic program meets 
the standards and 
expectations of its "State 
Curriculum Framework" which 
is a key component of the 
Education Reform Act of 
1993. These standards are 
implemented by engaging 
students in authentic tasks 
of "hands on" inquiry and 
problem solving employing 
critical thinking skills 
rather than mere recall of 
information. 

We currently have three 
students involved in a 
Regional Electronic Magnet 
School program with the 
Merrimack Education Center 
and a student enrolled in a 
Harvard University Extension 
School course, all of whom 
are doing very well 
academically. 

Our school district has been 
accepted as a PALMS 
(Partnerships Advancing 
Learning in Mathematics and 
Science) demonstration site. 
We will be working jointly 
with Merrimack Education 
Center and the Collaborative 
for Mathematics and Science Education at Salem State College for continued 
curriculum improvement in math, science and technology. 




Scientific demonstration by students of the West Intermediate School. 



One of the highlights of our program this past year was our science/health 
exposition entitled "Healthy Body/Healthy World" which enabled students to 
develop interesting and meaningful projects and investigate a plethora of 
timely topics in physical, biological and health sciences. Two students are 
now expanding their original investigation through cooperation with DiGiorgio 
Associates in Boston. We were assisted in our exposition through financial 
support from Winchester Hospital which has been a valuable curriculum resource 
to us over many years. Our exposition received a great deal of praise from 
professionals in science and medicine who served as judges. We continue to 
look for ways in the ensuing year to better serve the science and health 
education needs of the young people of Wilmington. 



A major emphasis of the curriculum of the English Department continues to be 
the teaching of writing. Frequently, students in Grades 6-12 in all levels of 
English are asked to write in the classroom and for homework. The process 
used in developing writing skills employs pre-writing activities, such as 
brainstorming and the collection of data. Later, students are instructed in 
the organization of their data through outlining and logical ordering. The 
rough draft of the assignment is often edited by other students and the 
teacher before the final paper is completed. 

At the High School, extra help on writing assignments is provided by the 
English Department. Computers in the MACLAB are available for use by students 
during English classes. Students are encouraged to work on their college 
applications through the English program. Lengthy essays on a variety of 
topics are often required and English teachers can help students focus their 
responses. 



-93- 



In addition to enrollment in a year long English course, students are 
encouraged to participate in a summer reading progreun and to enroll in an SAT 
Verbal Review course that reviews test taking procedures and prepares students 
for the exams. Also, a member of the English Department, Mr. Matthew Joyce, 
has been teaching a course in American Studies, in conjunction with Mrs. 
Lesley Basmajian of the Social Studies Department. Also, he has developed an 
AP production of an evening of student performances for the community. 

Again this year, students have participated in numerous writing and speaking 
contests at the local, state and national level. Students Reggie Hill, Elane 
Tohmc, and Carolyn Carvalho were prize winners in the VFW "Voice of Democracy" 
contest held in November. 

The Social Studies Department introduced a new course to the curriculum, 
American Studies. It is an interdisciplinary program that combines U.S. 
History and English, and encourages students toward self-directed learning and 
independent study. Also, students in the Social Studies classes will take 
part in the Mock Trial Tournament, sponsored by the Massachusetts Bar 
Association. Students will meet weekly to work on a case and will be coached 
by an attorney on courtroom procedures. The actual trials will take place in 
March and April, and will be presided over by a judge and held in an actual 
courtroom. 

The Industrial Arts programs at the High School were upgraded to Technology 
Education programs despite personnel cutbacks. The Wilmington model Technology 
Education program was set up for grades 9 and 10 students, both male and 
female, providing opportunities and experiences in areas of: communication 
technology; power, energy and transportation; materials processes technology. 

The Guidance Department offered the following services, programs, and reports: 
guidance information program; college representatives' meetings; preparation 
of college applications; scholarship program; career surveys; maintenance of 
student records; workstudy permits; NCAA Clearinghouse; administration of 
College Board examinations; hosted and conducted Financial Aid workshops and 
College Night; disseminated "Admissions: A Guide;" held grade classroom 
information sessions; coordinated and hosted meetings with various military 
representatives; issued periodic newsletters and communications to all 
parents; coordinated and chaired parent/faculty meetings; attended Special 
Education meetings; participated in the Dual Enrollment Program. 

1994 Postgraduate Plans: four-year college/university 64%, two-year 
college/university 23%, less than two-year 1%, Career Entry (work-bound) 6%, 
military 6%. 



COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND SERVICE PROJECTS 



For the past five years over 100 Wilmington High School students and staff 
have participated in the Bread and Roses Project. Bread and Roses is a place 
in Lawrence, MA that provides hot meals to over 200 needy people and families 
five nights a week. This is all done through volunteers and organization, 
such as high schools and churches. Wilmington High School has committed to 
provide one meal per month. 

The students and staff have also donated food to the Wilmington Food Pantry 
and warm clothing to help the needy of Wilmington. Students want to be more 
involved, reaching out and helping others, and are continuing to seek more 
opportunities. We are very proud of their efforts. 



-94- 



NORTH AND WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 




December 13. 1994. 



The second year 
of the 

Massachusetts 
Education Reform 
Act has provided 
the North and 
West 

Intermediate 
Schools with 
well planned 
School 
Improvement 
Plans. Each 
plan strives to 
enhance current 
educational 
practices while 
providing goals 
toward creating 
a more active, 
viable education 
atmosphere. 



As always, our focus is the adolescent student's welfare and academic needs. 
This past year students, parents, staff and members of the community at large 
shared in the direction our schools shall take. A well documented Strategic 
Plan combined with each individual School Improvement Plan created an 
atmosphere of public commitment, better understanding, a more focused 
curriculum and a broadening of the attention paid to our sixth, seventh and 
eighth grades. 



The new school year has brought improved opportunities for our young people. 
The new Career/Technology class provides students with an awareness of the 
world of business and technological applications. Time on task, raising 
academic standards, self-assessment, professional development and curriculum 
improvement remain at the forefront of both schools. 

Our students have taken on new responsibilities with programs in peer 
mediation, student activities and behavioral standards. A training progrsun in 
Peer Mediation highlighted our first month of school. Faculty and students 
from the North Intermediate School, West Intermediate School and High School 
combined their training efforts to provide student based solutions to 
conflicts and improved decision-making practices. 

The Marshall's After School Scholastic Program provides valuable after school 
activities for many of our young people. Further plans for after school 
programs are being planned in the areas of creative arts, homework support, 
academic enrichment, and D.A.R.E. Viable transition programs from grade to 
grade have been proposed and professional development, inservice programs and 
curriculum improvement committees continue to be areas of teachers' efforts to 
enhance educational instruction and programs. 

The Massachusetts Assessment test reviewed improved performance in all major 
academic areas and set a positive tone for further strides in academic 
achievement. New materials in Social Studies and Science and the continued 
success of inclusionary and cooperative teaching practices all continue to 
provide positive steps toward achieving the goals of our school system's 
Strategic Educational Plan and meet the needs of this most exciting age. 

SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 

"A Year of Caring" defines the 1994-1995 school year at the Shawsheen 
Elementary School. We are dedicating this year to a very important value that 
will be stressed in all avenues of education within the Shawsheen School - 
respect for self, respect for others and a respect for property. Throughout 
the school year we will be working with children to promote these values in 



-95- 



every aspect of their lives. We will be recognizing children within the 
school and the community who demonstrate that they care. 

The Parent Advisory Committee continues to present to the children a program 
rich in diversity. The cooperative efforts of our Parent Advisory Committee 
and its members have provided assistance to our teachers in the area of mini- 
grants and enrichment assemblies. We acknowledge the fact that the parents 
are our partners in education and appreciate the immeasurable ways in which 
they assist, advise and support our efforts. 




Shawsheen School students enjoy using the computer in the school Ithim \ 



The Shawsheen School PAC continues to support the children and the staff of 
the school with a very successful Math-A-Thon fund raising effort. Monies 
raised by the PAC are used to purchase computers for the school, enrichiment 
programs and support for the school's staff. 

Parent volunteers continue to be a vital part of the school's overall program. 
Parents contribute their time working in the school's office, the school's 
library and in the classrooms as readers and aides. Many teachers have 
invited parents into their classrooms to speak about their jobs and expose the 
children to a variety of work opportunities. 

The first year of our School Advisory Committee, formed under the new 
Educational Reform Act of 1993, saw a School Improvement Plan developed for 
the Shawsheen School that focused on issues of class size, discipline, safety, 
parental involvement, staff development, mainstreaming and extra-curricular 
activities. 

During the month of October, over 90 of our grade five children journeyed to 
Nature's Classroom in Charlton, Massachusetts for a week of environmental 
education. During that week the children were involved in a program that 
teaches students environmental science, science, math, social science and 
language arts skills. The goals in presenting the natural environment are to 
impart knowledge and excite and motivate students to personally seek after 
knowledge. With this attitude students are more willing to take on the tasks 
of learning when they return to the classroom. 



-96- 



Eight students from the Shawsheen Elementary School were among the finalists 
of Continental Cablevision ' s "Suit Up for the Space Shuttle" educational 
contest. The fifth grade teeuns designed and built models of space suits fit 
for a planet of their choice, as part of a curriculum developed specifically 
for the "Suit Up for the Space Shuttle" contest by U.S. Space Camp educators. 
The students' preparation involved learning about conditions on the solar 
system's planets, survival in space and the tasks involved in space 
exploration. 

The Shawsheen School continues to face many changes as it moves to the 21st 
century. Our growth continues and our staff consistently presents an 
outstanding program in all academic areas. The children have the full support 
of their parents and their teachers. 



WILDWOOD SCHOOL 



Upon return from their summer vacation students were greeted with several 
physical improvements made to the Wildwood School. Some of these physical 
improvements, completed during the summer months and ensuing months, include: 
improved lighting in the corridors; a repaired roof; installation of a new 
sub-floor and tiles in Room 8; painted ceilings in the corridors; new bulletin 
boards installed throughout the corridors; construction of new windows at the 
end of the corridor for improved lighting; new handicapped bathroom installed 
in the nurse's office; and mini computer lab for the Apple HE and GS across 
from the office. We appreciate the cooperation among the town departments in 
order to complete these renovations. 

The Wildwood Elementary School continues to experience high enrollments, 
especially in kindergarten, grade three and grade five. The recommended 
budget for the next year begins to address some of these concerns. Also, the 
current staff strives to continue to provide a quality program for our many 
students. 



The Wildwood School students are enjoying a reading incentive progrsun with a 
Native American theme. After reading at home, students earn attractive hand 
painted Native American beads which they wear on necklaces. The students, 
parents and teachers are proud of their reading accomplishments and report 
children spending less time watching television. 



The Elementary Science/Health Committee recommended the adoption of the 
Science and Technology for Children Program, and the health strand from the 
Scholastic Company. The preliminary feedback from students, parents and 
teachers regarding this hands-on science progrcim is very positive. In 
addition to these programs, teachers attended a week-long science workshop at 
Simmons College to create Modules for their classrooms. These modules are a 
joint effort with local businesses and will soon supplement our science 
program. 

A newly created 
MAC Computer 
Lab was 
installed in 
our media 
center 

containing 14 
LC575 computers 
and 

accompanying 
software. The 
funding for 
these computers 
was provided by 
the After 
School Progreun 
which is 
directed by 
Miss 
Kelley. 




MAC Computer Lab at the Wildwood School. 



-97- 



The Wildwood School Council, in its second year of operation, is implementing 
last year's school improvement plan and creating a new plan for next year. 
Some suggestions from our needs assessment and current plan which have been 
implemented include: installation of a Parent Information Center; purchase 
and use of homework organizers for students in grades three, four, and five; 
expanded use of teacher newsletters; distribution of informative teacher 
handouts at Open House; creation of a database of interested parents to share 
their expertise, hobbies, and interests; implementation of safety measures at 
school. The School Council will also continue to offer advice regarding any 
adjustments to the budget. 

Just prior to our state elections, the students at the Wildwood School were 
given the opportunity to participate in their own "mock election." The entire 
student body made their choice for senator, governor, and lieutenant governor. 
The event was very special since the students voted using actual electronic 
voting machines. Many departments in Wilmington worked cooperatively to offer 
this experience to the students. 

During the fall, our fifth grade students began their school year with a 
special week-long environmental experience at Nature's Classroom in Charlton, 
Massachusetts. The students enjoyed the many learning opportunities which 
were offered to them. 

The inclusionary model to support our students needing academic assistance 
continues to be implemented. The resource room teachers, reading specialist, 
and educational assistant support the students in their classroom rather than 
instructing the students separately outside their classroom. This 
inclusionary approach provides additional support to both students with and 
without special needs. 

The Lottery Arts Council awarded a grant to our music teacher, Mrs. Toby 
Simon, which supported the students' attendance at the Nutcracker. Due to 
this award, the entire fifth grade student population was able to attend this 
performance free of charge. 

The Parent Advisory Council continues to work closely with the teachers, 
students, and administration of the Wildwood School. The PAC continues to 
support the Wildwood community by offering many family activities, raising 
funds, and volunteering in the school. In addition to these events, the PAC 
sponsored a six week long after school program and the following enrichment 
programs: Michael Glasser — illustrator and author; Mr. Wizard — science 
program; Stories From Planet Earth — Kracker Jack Theatre's presentation of 
various cultures around the world; North American Birds of Prey — Native 
American and Birds of Prey presentations; Legend of Sleepy Hollow — students 
from the school were involved in this popular dramatization; Laser Show — David 
Wood, Ph.D. 



WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

The Woburn Street School has been involved in a variety of educational 
activities over this past school year. A few of the noteworthy events are as 
follows: Nature's Classroom, A Writer's Night, Fifth Grade Science and Social 
Studies Fair; Chapter 1, Whole Language Teachers' Study Group and our 
Volunteer Program. 

In October, over 80 fifth grade students participated in Nature's Classroom. 
Tom Mirisola, our fifth grade teacher, coordinated this week-long 
environmental science based experience. This hands-on program gives each 
student a first-hand glimpse of our natural environment and encourages 
students to explore and question the world around them. Another valuable 
aspect of this experience is that students learn to respect and appreciate 
each other. This is accomplished by having the students work in various teams 
on science projects, exploration hikes, cooperative games and experiencing 
dormitory life. The culminating effect being that when the fifth graders 
return to school, they continue to work together and join in the common 
pursuit of knowledge. 



-98- 



The Woburn Street School staff was awarded a Whole Language Teachers' Study 
Group Grant by the Whole Language Teachers Association. This grant provided 
teachers an opportunity to study the whole language philosophy using the book 
"Whole Language, Getting Started — Moving Forward." The group, led by 
kindergarten teacher, Anne Field, met monthly to discuss and share ideas on 
how they were integrating whole language and the writing process into their 
classrooms. 

In May, we celebrated Writer's Night at the Woburn Street School. Family and 
friends were treated to a variety of forms of writing. There were books, 
stories, and poems authored by the students. There were also stories authored 
by entire classes as well as varied non-fiction selections. The students 
utilized the process writing method to develop their ideas and written pieces. 
An enjoyable evening was had by all. 

Our fifth graders, led by their science teacher. Donna Caruso, worked 
diligently for two months on a variety of science projects that culminated in 
a science fair last June. Each student selected a science or health topic to 
research. The students prepared a report, charts and visual aids for their 
presentation. Some of the interesting topics were: Acid Rain, Sound, 
Recycled Paper, Water Pressure, Erosion and Solar Energy. The students were 
eager to explain their projects to parents, visitors and their schoolmates. 

The fifth graders also held their annual Social Studies Fair under the 
direction of their teacher, Sandra Woods. The fair, which involved the 50 
states, was a culminating activity that the students had been working on 
throughout the year. Their projects included a report, a state map, and a 
poster depicting the state's products, bird, and flower. In addition, the 
students created special models that depict a point of interest in their 
state. 

The Chapter 1 program at the Woburn Street School is a preventative reading 
program for students in grades one through three. Using the inclusionary 
model, the Chapter 1 teacher, Janice Puleo, works within the classroom with 
children who have been selected by a multiple criteria checklist. Children in 
five designated Chapter 1 classrooms are seen daily in a small group or whole 
group setting. Other students rec[uiring assistance or instruction may also be 
serviced periodically when necessary. The Chapter 1 teacher works closely 
with the classroom teacher to supplement and enrich the language arts program 
and meet the students' individual needs. The Chapter 1 teacher is also a 
resource person to other staff members in the school. 

The Woburn Street School continued to be actively involved in community 
related projects throughout the year. The school conducted their annual food 
drive collecting various food and household products which were delivered to 
support the Wilmington Food Pantry. Thanks to Jack Fahey, Guidance Counselor, 
this latest drive proved to be the most successful. 

Our students also donated $1.00 of their allowance or earned money for a 
holiday collection. These funds were dispersed in the form of gift 
certificates at the local supermarkets to feimilies in need. 

A special thank you to the many parents and friends who spent countless hours 
volunteering at our school this year. Our 45 volunteers assisted students in 
the library media center, the computer lab, as writing coaches in the 
classroom, and as individual tutors. 

PERFORMING AND FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 

During this past year, the Performing and Fine Arts Department continued its 
tradition of serving all students in art and music classes, grades 1-8, as 
well as providing diverse offerings for students in grades 9-12. These 
classes ranged from art, photography and ceramics to band, chorus and general 
music. It was heartening for teachers and parents alike to witness the pride 
students displayed in their art work and musical ability throughout this 
calendar year. 



-99- 



School and community exhibits and concerts were numerous and well received. 
Elementary school students participated successfully in several poster, slogan 
and calendar contests while High School students again received awards in the 
Globe Scholastic Art Show. The Performing and Fine Arts Department has 
reached out into the community this year with great results. The new logo for 
the Wilmington School/Business Partnership was designed by a high school 
student as the result of a contest sponsored by the Partnership. The High 
School band represented Wilmington in parades in Woburn, Billerica, Methuen, 
Lawrence and, last March, the band proudly marched down Constitution Avenue as 
a part of the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Washington, D.C. 




High School Wildcat Band. 



The tireless fundraising efforts of Wilmington Band Parents and Friends have 
resulted in the accpjisition of much needed equipment and other financial 
assistance. Band parents are currently making two hundred uniform vests for 
the Elementary and Middle School bands. If all goes according to schedule, 
our younger bands will be sporting their new look at the Memorial Day Parade. 




Intermediate School Band. 



-100- 



Thanks to the efforts of several high school students, the Special Education 
Office is now decorated with a large scale mural and stenciled designs. Two 
photography students are currently on the staff at the Town Crier and have 
already contributed to that publication. We hope to continue this trend into 
1995. 

The High School Art Department hosted an open house featuring not only student 
work but also demonstrations that allowed the viewers to participate in making 
art. Middle School students contributed drawn tiles of faces of the world to 
an international exhibition which was displayed at the United Nations. The 
elementary classes once again used their talents to decorate their respective 
stages for all school concerts. 

All these accomplishments are the result of dedicated teachers, enthusiastic 
students and the school system's strong commitment to the arts. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 189 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 529 special needs students ages 
3-22. 

The Special Education Department submitted five federal grants to the 
Department of Education to supplement local funding for services. A total of 
$207,395.00 has been awarded to the school district as a result of these grant 
applications. These federal monies are currently being utilized to enhance 
special education, occupational therapy, counseling services and speech 
therapy services. Some of these funds also assist the School Department's 
integrated early childhood program for children both with and without special 
needs. 

The Special Education Department continues to work closely with the principals 
and regular education teachers in the district to maximize the mainstreaming 
and inclusion of special needs students within the school system. A summative 
evaluation of an ongoing cooperative teaching program was presented to the 
School Committee by staff representing each school in town. The overwhelming 
result of the evaluation showed that many more special needs students were 
being included in regular education programs than in prior years. The results 
indicated beneficial effects were being experienced by both children with 
special needs and children without special needs. Parental and staff 
attitudes were very supportive of the school district's three year efforts. 
Just under 50% of the school district's teachers are involved, to some extent, 
with the mainstreaming and inclusion effort. 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

The Wilmington School Food Service Department has been working very hard to 
increase participation in our program. Along with serving approximately 
241,500 student meals and 19,500 senior citizen lunches, we have been catering 
many activities. Our services have been called on to prepare, serve or 
supervise the National Honor Society Banquet, Music Department Awards Dinner, 
PAC Spaghetti Suppers and Breakfasts, the Pop Warner Dinner and many coffee 
hours and meetings. 

One of the community support programs that we are particularly proud of is our 
Senior Citizen Lunch Program. We serve lunch each day to the senior citizen 
population of Wilmington at the High School. We encourage any and all of you 
to participate. Call the Drop-In Center a day ahead to place a reservation 
for the next day. It is a wonderful opportunity to socialize with fellow 
senior citizens. We are also responsible for the Meals-on-Wheels program. 
Contact the Drop-In Center for more information. 

The staff has had an opportunity to participate in training programs presented 
by Massachusetts School Food Service Association and the Bureau of School 
Nutrition Services, Department of Education, as well as our own in-service 
department . 



-101- 



We will be participating once again in Freuningham State College's Graduate 
Intern Program by having a student intern study under Wilmington's School Food 
Service Prograun. We are always enriched by the experience and it keeps us on 
our toes. 

We have increased student lunch participation by continuing to concentrate on 
lowering fat, salt and sugar in our menus. We have purchased MAC computers 
for our office to make it possible for us to computerize our office accounts, 
menus, nutritional analysis of our menus and, in general, bring us into the 
current technological marketplace. 

We are retaining our status as a self-supporting department within the School 
Department under very difficult economic times. By being self-supporting, we 
pay all salaries, including administrative salaries, office expenses, all food 
and equipment purchases, as well as some utility and maintenance costs from 
the school food service account without subsidy from the School Department 
budget. It is increasingly difficult to continue this self-supporting status. 

We are always striving to improve our services to the students and community 
and are happy to respond to any suggestions and requests when possible. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12), as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. The 
program sponsors a physical education "Mile Club" to encourage physical 
fitness in grades 5 through 8. 

The health program in grades K-5, under the direction of Mrs. Laura Stinson, 
has incorporated "Project Charlie" into the curriculum. In grade 5, we offer 
the DARE program, in cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and 
Officer Chip Bruce. These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol 
education through the teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision 
making . 

The Physical Education Department cited several students for outstanding 
achievement in physical education: 



1994 Susan Errico and Michael Tentindo 

1995 Andrea Feizidis and Wes Dunham 
Michele Castronovo and Marc DiJulia 
Rachel Keefe and Shyam Brown 
Debbie Fisher and Sean Crowley 

1996 Tegan Stadnyck and Mike Marsi 
Jee Hyun Kim and Matt Vogel 
Laurie Johnson and Kevin Kacamburas 
Valerie Doyan and Stephen Jansen 

1997 Melissa Shea and Phil Bates 
Melissa Palermo and Sean Farrell 
Angela Cardinale and Joe Bamburg 
Lisa Crowley and Tom Casella 
Julie Stokes and John Considine 



Athletic Awards - 1994 

Dr. Gerald Fagan Award - "To The Outstanding Athlete" 

Adrienne Fay (Merrimack College) and David Dussault (Plymouth State) 

Lawrence H. Gushing Award - "To The Senior Athlete Demonstrating Scholarship 
Sportsmanship and Athletic Ability" 

Stacey Gillis (U. of Mass.- Amherst) and Bryan McFeeters (U. of Mass.- Lowell) 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award - "To The Senior With The Most Dedication To 
Sports" 

Jill Murphy (Springfield College) and John MacKinnon (Merrimack College) 

George Spanos Award - "For Contribution And Service To W.H.S. Athletics" 
Milton "Uncle Miltie" Heffron 



-102- 



Alumni Award - Recognizes former outstanding student-athletes who have gone on 
and continued to demonstrate their commitment to excellence. 
Gina Martiniello - Class of 1990, Providence College '94 
Suzy Walsh - Class of 1990, Bentley College '94 
Greg Catanzano - Class of 1990, Williams College '94 



Top "10" Awards 
his/her class. 



Senior athletes who academically finish in the Top "10" of 



Rank 

2 Laura DeMarco 

4 Cliff Esher 

5 Bryan Maleszyk 

6 Luana DiSarro 

MVC All Conference Awards 

Kathleen Rooney '95 

Adrienne Fay '94 

Kerry Anderson '95 

Adrienne Fay '94 

Leanne Harris '96 

Nancy Pote '95 

Jacqui Hayden '95 

Leanne Harris '96 

Jaimie Forgett '95 

Jill Murphy '94 

Mary Armata '95 

Andy Armata '95 



(Colby College) 
(Stonehill College) 
(Boston University) 
(Boston College) 



(field hockey) 
(basketball) 
(field hockey) 
(Softball) 
(field hockey) 
(Softball) 
( soccer) 
(Softball) 
(soccer) 
(spring track) 
( soccer) 
( soccer) 



The 1994 girls basketball team coached by Jim Tildsley qualified for the state 
tournament and won the first tourney game in memory. The 1994 girls Softball 
team coached by Paul Lyman and Jake Townsend, were the M.V.C. small school 
champions and went on to win their second straight Eastern Massachusetts 
Championship as well as the Division 2 State Championship. Only two seniors 
were on the team, co-captain and all-scholastic Adrienne Fay and co-captain 
and four year starter Stacey Gillis. The 1994 girls and boys soccer teams 
coached by Sue Hendee and Dick Scanlon, qualified for the state tourncunent for 
the second straight year. The 1994 girls field hockey team coached by Jan 
Urquhart and Maureen Noone, again qualified for the state tournament. 




High School Hockey Team competing in the Haverhill Christmas Tournament — Wilmington won the Tournament. 



-103- 



PERSONNEL 



The following people retired from the Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Francis P. Kelley, Mary Jane Wilkinson, Susan Eaton, Linda Marinel, 
Lorraine Kalil, and John Campbell. The Wilmington School Community wishes to 
thank these people for their years of dedicated service to the children of 
Wilmington and wish them many happy and healthful retirement years. 

In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, parents, and students who 
contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the 1994 
school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system in 1994. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 

Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee are: Anthony R. 
Mazzone and Mark Trifiro from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman and 
Bernard F. Hoar, Secretary, from Billerica; John P. Miller, Chairman and 
Alfred Verrier from Burlington; and Richard E. Griffin and J. Peter Downing, 
Treasurer, from Tewksbury. 

School Committee representation from the Town of Wilmington changed in 1994. 
Michael Smith served as a Wilmington representative on the Regional School 
Committee for one term (1991-1994) and decided not to seek re-election. At 
the annual Town Election, James M. Gillis was elected as one of Wilmington's 
two representatives to the Regional School Committee. The school district 
gratefully appreciates the contribution of Mr. Smith. 

In October of 1994, John M. Gillis, who began his service representing 
Wilmington on the Regional School Committee in 1986, experienced an untimely 
death. He was elected by his School Committee colleagues as Treasurer (1987- 
1990), Vice Chairman (1991) and Chairman (1992). He was regarded as a 
thoughtful, caring and compassionate human being. Due to his highly regarded 
public service, both the Parent Advisory Council and the Regional School 
District Committee established scholarships in his honor in November of 1994. 

In November of 1994, Attorney Robert Peterson of Wilmington was appointed to 
fill the remainder of John Gillis' unexpired term. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical is one of twenty-five regional vocational technical 
school districts in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Comprehensive quality 
vocational/technical education was provided to one thousand eighty-six 
Shawsheen high school students. High school enrollment increased eight 
percent since 1992. Seven hundred adults participated in the part-time Adult 
Education program and nearly two hundred junior high school students 
participated in the after school Career Education program. 

Two hundred high school seniors graduated in 1994. Over ninety-seven percent 
of the graduates either acquired jobs within their skilled professions or 
pursued higher education at various colleges. Shawsheen Valley Technical 's 
graduation placement statistics continued to be amongst the best in 
Massachusetts . 

Upon entering Shawsheen Valley Technical in grade nine, students spend every 
other week experiencing and exploring fourteen different vocational/technical 
professions. There are twenty different vocational/technical majors at 
Shawsheen Valley ranging from Electronics to Metal Fabrication to Health 
Technology to Culinary Arts. Citizens can receive a copy of program offerings 
by calling the Guidance Department at (508) 667-2111 weekdays from 7:30 a.m. 
until 3 p.m. 

Freshmen students select a shop major in April of their freshman year and 
spend the next three years majoring in a particular trade. In the fall of the 
senior year, most students initiate employment with local companies during 
their shop week, as apprentices or co-op placements. Eligibility for early 



-104- 



placement is dependant upon academic proficiency and fulfillment of 
vocational/technical competencies. Students spend alternate weeks in academic 
classes. Due to a longer school day as compared to other high schools 
combined with elimination of study hall periods, Shawsheen students receive 
all necessary academic instruction required for acceptance at all colleges or 
universities. Recent graduates have received full scholarships at colleges 
including: Brown University, Suffolk University, Syracuse University and the 
University of Massachusetts at Lowell. 

Area companies both hire Shawsheen Valley students and regularly consult 
Shawsheen teachers and administrators on needed curriculum changes and 
equipment modifications. The School Committee deeply appreciates the 
contributions from these two hundred and seventy businessmen who serve on 
Shawsheen Valley's craft advisory councils. 

Many activities took place during 1994 which deserve special recognition: 

* Shawsheen continued its participation as active members of the Merrimack 
Valley Occupational and Tech Prep Educators Collaborative. This 
collaborative is coordinated by the Chief Executive Officers of six area 
vocational technical schools and the Presidents of Middlesex and 
Northern Essex Community Colleges. Charles Lyons, Shawsheen Valley 
Technical 's Superintendent-Director, was elected President of MOVTEC in 
1994. Formed three years ago to articulate acceptance and access for 
graduating seniors into related associate degree programs at the 
community colleges, it has expanded to providing advanced college credit 
for over four hundred Shawsheen juniors and seniors for courses being 
taken while in high school. Over one hundred and sixty-eight Shawsheen 
graduates are currently enrolled in associate degree programs at the 
neighboring community colleges. 

* Shawsheen initiated phase one of its school-wide technology plan to 
network the school and acquire direct access to the Internet. James 
Smyth, Director of Computer Programs, was hired to replace retiring 
Richard Springer, Director of Data Processing, to supervise Shawsheen 
Valley's technology plan which includes the initiation of a new 
vocational/technical major entitled Telecommunications/Networking. 

* Shawsheen Valley Technical students excelled in interscholastic 
athletics. The Soccer Team, Football Team, and Cross Country Team won 
league championships while the Hockey Team and Volleyball Team qualified 
for the state tournament. Over five hundred Shawsheen students 
participated in the fourteen different interscholastic programs offered 
at the school. 



* Shawsheen students also excelled in the Vocational Industrial Clubs of 
America (VICA) competition. This competition is sponsored by the 
Department of Education and includes individual competition among 
students from other vocational/technical schools in trade and technical 
areas. Shawsheen Valley won twenty-six medals in state competition, 
including thirteen first place gold medals. Shawsheen students 
participated in areas including: Advertising Design; Air Conditioning; 
Auto Machine Shop; Health Care; Masonry; Cosmetology; Diesel Mechanics; 
Desk Top Publishing; Health Occupations; Machine Drafting; Medical 
Assisting; Promotional Bulletin Board Display; Plumbing; Electrical 
Wiring and Welding. 

Fourteen students participated in the National VICA competition. National 
medal winners included Shawn Mahoney who won the gold medal in Advertising 
Design, Chris Nawossa who won the silver medal in Air Conditioning and the 
four member team of Holly Canales, Shauna Napoli, Andrew Geddry and Jessica 
Borden who all shared the bronze medal in Health Technology. 

* Shawsheen Valley Technical staff, alumni, and friends participated in 
the second Alumni Golf Tournament held annually at the Andover Country 
Club. Over fourteen thousand dollars has been raised during the past 
two years with interest only to be used from this trust account for 
scholarships for Shawsheen graduates. 



-105- 



* Shawsheen Valley's Adult Technical Institute was licensed by the 
Massachusetts Board of Nursing to begin a Licensed Practical Nursing 
Program in September of 1994. Over one hundred thirty applicants 
applied for admission for forty seats in the L.P.N, course. The course 
operates four evenings per week and on weekends for a ten month period. 
Internship partners include: Tewksbury State Hospital, Lahey Clinic, 
Winchester Hospital, Emerson Hospital, Wilmington Woods Nursing Home, 
and New England Pediatrics, Inc. 

* The District was saddened with the loss of Ralph Carvalho. Mr. Carvalho 
served the district for seventeen years and was an extraordinary English 
Teacher and Department Chairman. The staff initiated a scholarship in 
his memory from proceeds earned at the annual Shawsheen Valley Technical 
Alumni Golf Tournament. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical receives requests for assistance from many of the 
various departments and organizations within the district. Each request is 
individually evaluated and its acceptance as a school project is based on 
whether it will assist in meeting our educational objectives, the length of 
time it may take, and the availability of resources needed. All expenses for 
projects, such as supplies and materials, are borne by those requesting the 
project. These projects provide Shawsheen students with the opportunity of 
doing hands-on work and learning skills that will be marketable upon 
graduation as well as lending assistance to the district. 

Several projects completed during the past year are: 

* Construction of a press box at Burlington High School football field. 
The press box provides a place for filming, videotaping and announcing 
games and activities taking place on the field. 

* Installation of doors and construction of brick walls at the Billerica 
Police Station. 

* Fabrication and installation of safety railings at the Billerica Town 
Hall. 

* Participation by our Health students at the annual Health Fair conducted 
by the Town of Billerica. 

* Saturday morning workshops at the Wilmington Regional Health Center in 
automotive maintenance and home repair. 

* Design specifications, as well as plumbing and electrical work for the 
Wilmington Community Resource Center, a joint project for the Town of 
Wilmington and Winchester Hospital. 

* Each year Shawsheen Valley Technical Construction Department students 
build a home in the district. This year's construction project was a 
nine-room garrison colonial built on Fiorenza Drive in Wilmington. The 
home included a two-car garage under, four bathrooms, a five-zone hot 
water heating system, two fireplaces, a walk out deck from the kitchen 
and a stone front entrance. Citizens interested in participating in the 
annual house building lottery at Shawsheen Tech should contact Mr. 
Anthony Bazzinotti, Director of Vocational Technical Programs at (508) 
667-2111, Ext. 143 for eligibility requirements. 

Shawsheen Tech's continued success is a direct result of the support received 
from district Town Administrators, Boards of Selectmen, Finance Committees, 
and citizens. We very much appreciate their cooperation and support. 



-106- 



Town Meetings 



SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY - FEBRUARY 1. 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: 



CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of MaBsachusetts you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in Primaries to vote at Wildwood Street School, Precinct 6, on Tuesday, 
the first day of February, 1994 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: To cast their votes in the State Primaries for candidates of 
political parties for the following office: State Representative, 21st 
Middlesex District. 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Bradley H. 
All Others 
Blanks 



Jones Jr. 



23 






Sandra J. Trainor 35 
All Others 
Blanks 



Total 



23 



Total 



35 



This special primary election was held because of the resignation of Robert C. 
Krekorian creating a vacancy in the Twenty-First Middlesex District. 
There were a total of fifty-eight votes. 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION - MARCH 1. 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in Primaries to vote at Wildwood Street School, Precinct 6, on Tuesday, 
the first day of March, 1994 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: To cast their votes in the Special State Election for candidates for 
the following office: State Representative, in the General Court, 2l8t 
Middlesex District. 

The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by the Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon, and 
closed at 8:00 p.m. The results are as follows: 

Republican Bradley H. Jones, Jr. 91 

Democrat Sandra J. Trainer 94 

Blank 1 

Total 186 

Sandra Trainer received the most votes in Wilmington but Bradley H. Jones, Jr. 
from Reading was elected from the entire 21st Middlesex District, Wilmington 
being only one Precinct of the district. 



-107- 



WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 16, 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of MaBBachusetts and in the manner 
prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs to meet and 
assemble at the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 1, 2 and 5) and the Wildwood 
School (Precincts 3, 4 and 6), N.B., Saturday the sixteenth day of April, A.D. 
1994 at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and 
shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of Town Officers: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices, to wit: One Selectman for the term of Three Years; 
One Moderator for the term of Three Years; Two Members of the School 
Committee for the terms of Three Years; One Member of the Housing Authority 
for the term of Two Years; One Member of the Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee for the term of Three Years. 

QUESTION: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to assess an additional 
$575,837 in real estate and personal property taxes for the purpose of funding 
the operation and maintenance of the Boutwell School, for the fiscal year 
beginning July first, nineteen hundred and ninety four?" 



YES 



NO 



You are also hereby further rec[uired and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qpjalified to vote on elections 
and Town affairs therein to assemble subsecpjent ly and meet in the Town Meeting 
at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the Twenty-Third day of April, A.D. 1994 at 10:30 a.m., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was called by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall and the Assistant Town Clerk, 
Carolyn Kenney at the Wildwood School, and the Warrant as above was read. 
All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could examine them before the polls were opened. The checkers were 
prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and everything 
was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. and the Town Clerk declared the polls open. 

The results were as follows: 



SELECTMEN for three years (vote for one) 



Voted 



Robert J. Cain 
Anthony P. Capuano 
James J. Rooney 
Thomas W. Siracusa 
Blanks 
Total 



39 Arlene Avenue (Candidate Re-election) 
1 Ring Avenue 
47 Towpath Drive 
5 Elwood Road 



1,236 
1, 138 
1,201 
1,075 
146 
4,796 



MODERATOR for three years (vote for one) 

James C. Stewart 9 Ring Avenue (Candidate Re-election) 



Total 



3,391 



Total 






4,796 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


for three 


years (vote for two) 


Voted 


Madeleine Leger 


27 


Sheldon Avenue 


2,399 


Robert Surran 


13 


Crest Avenue 


2,789 


Blanks 






4,404 



9,592 



-108- 



HOUSING AUTHORITY for two years (unexpired term vote for one) Voted 

Melvin F. Keough 11 Magazine Road 2,948 

Blanks 1.848 

Total 4,796 

SHAWSHEEN REG/VOC SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE for three years Voted 

(Vote for one) 

James M. Gillis 120 Federal Street 1,702 

Judson Miller 84 Grove Avenue 788 

James T. Murray 76 Salem Street 1,539 

Blanks 767 

Total 4,796 



QUESTION: "Shall the Town of Wilmington be allowed to assess an additional 
$575,837 in real estate and personal property taxes for the purpose of funding 
the operation and maintenance of the Boutwell School, for the fiscal year 
beginning July first, nineteen hundred and ninety four?" 

YES NO 



The results of the election were ready about 10:00 p.m. and all the elected 
officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town 
Clerk shortly thereafter. The total number of votes cast was 4,796 which 
included 267 absentee ballots. The total number of registered voters are 
11,555 of which 42% voted in this town election. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 23. 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a cjuorum present at 10:45 a.m. (155) James Stewart, the Moderator opened 
the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. He then read the names 
of departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year and a moment of silence was observed. He then introduced 
our newly elected and re-elected town officials and thanked former School 
Committee members Shirley Callan and Robert Peterson for their service on the 
School Committee and also. Town Clerk, Kay Scanlon and her staff for their 
work at Election and Town Meeting. 

The Moderator then started to read the Warrant and was interrupted by Town 
Manager, Michael Caira, "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2: To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Michael 
Caira, "I move that the Town pass over this article." Motion seconded and so 
voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything 
in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1994, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-109- 



Motion by Diane M. Allen, "I move that the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1994, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the Town and the salaries of several Town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George W. Hooper of Finance Committee, "I move that the several and 
respective sums as recommended and presented by the Finance Committee be 
raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for 
the purpose set forth in Article #5, each department's budget to be taken up 
and voted on in the order they appear, subject to amendment, and each 
department's budget not open for reconsideration until the entire budget is 
voted. " 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 1,600 

Expenses 7,350 

Total 8,950 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries (p.t.) 14,498 

Expenses 3 , 105 

Total 17,603 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,690 

Expenses 3 . 500 

Total 5,190 

Finance Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 1,200 

Expenses 4.725 

Total 5,925 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 75,000 

Other Salaries 185,920 

Expenses 41,600 

Furnishings & Equipment 500 

Total 303,020 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 54,2 72 

Other Salaries 59,830 

Expenses 2 . 020 

Total 116,122 

Treasurer /Col lector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 54,272 

Other Salaries 94,596 

Expenses 26,850 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 175,718 



-110- 



Town Clerk 



Salary - Town Clerk 


41, 646 


Other Salaries 


34 , 469 


Expenses 


2, 100 


Furnishings & Equipment 





Total 


78, 215 


Board of Assessors 




Salary - Principal Assessor 


54, 717 


Other Salaries 


62,125 


Expenses 


29,200 


Appraisals, E.D.P & Inventories 


50, 000 


ATB/Appraisals 





Furnishings & Equipment 





Total 


196,042 


Town Counsel 




Personal Services & Expenses 


57.200 


Permanent Building Committee 




Salaries (p. t . ) 


500 


Expenses 


100 


Total 


600 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 964.585 

PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salary - Chief 69,295 

Salary - Deputy Chief 56,107 

Salary - Lieutenant 100,057 

Salary - Sergeants 256,706 

Salary - Patrolmen 1,040,795 

Salary - Clerks 61,481 

Salary - Fill-In Costs 211,573 

Salary - Paid Holidays 64,368 

Salary - Specialist 10,200 

Salary - Night Differential 34,000 

Salary - Incentive Pay 31,980 

Sick Leave Buyback 12,826 

Expenses 119,484 

Furnishings & Equipment 36, 588 

Total 2,105,460 

Fire 

Salary - Chief 57,262 

Salary - Deputy Chief 50,936 

Salary - Lieutenants 212,237 

Salary - Privates 872,583 

Salary - Dispatch Clerks 53,708 

Overtime Costs 141,800 

Paid Holidays 64,030 

EMT & Incentive Pay 58,928 

Fire Alarm Salary 10,545 

Sick Leave Buyback 13,381 

Expenses 52,300 

Furnishings & Equipment 10. 375 

Total 1,598,085 

Emergency Management 

Salaries 

Expenses 1,650 

Furnishings & Equipment 1, 350 

Total 3,000 



-m- 



Animal Control 
Salaries 

Contract Services 

Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



20,438 
5,500 
500 
26,438 

3,732.983 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Personal Services 

DPW - Superintendent 
Engineer - Full Time 
Engineer - Part Time 
Highway - Full Time 
Highway - Other Part Time 
Tree - Full Time 
Tree - Overtime 
Parks/Grounds - Full Time 
Parks/Grounds - Part Time 
Parks/Grounds - Overtime 
Cemetery-Full Time 



70,678 
73,717 
35, 503 
766,714 


76, 100 
5,000 
121,020 


12,535 
97,205 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum 
S I . 383 , 892 be appropriated for Public Works Personal Services 
Cemetery - Full Time; the sum of $ 25 , OOP to be raised by transfer 
from the Sale of Cemetery Lots Account and the sum of S 15.000 to be 
raised by transfer from the Interest - Cemetery Trust Funds being th 
total sum of $ 40. OOP , and the balance of $ 1.343.892 to be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



Cemetery - Part Time 
Cemetery - Overtime 
Snow & Ice - Ex. Help/0. T. 

Contractual Services 
Engineer 
Highway 

Highway-Repair Town Vehicles 
Tree 

Parks/Grounds 
Cemetery 

Road Machinery-Repair 

Public Street Lights 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 

Snow & Ice-Repair 

Snow & Ice-Misc. 

Total 





5,785 
119.635 
1,383,892 

900 
25,140 
56,950 
3,402 
3,353 
4,075 
6P,PPP 
199, 7PP 
1,261,732 
16,246 
66.PPP 
1,697,498 



Materials & Supplies 
Engineer 

Highway-Expenses 

Highway-Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 
Highway-Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 
Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 
Tree 

Parks/Grounds 

Cemetery 

C81M-Expen8es 

Drainage Projects-Expenses 
Snow & Ice- Sand & Salt 
Snow & Ice- Tools & Equipment 
Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



1,3PP 
31,PPP 
22,6PP 
53,566 
45,828 
5,895 
25,PPP 
10,650 
60,796 
15,000 
87, 139 
4,000 



362,774 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



3.444. 164 



-112- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



Board of Health 

Salary - Director 46,868 

Other Salaries (inc.P/T) 78,001 

Expenses 6,100 

Mental Health 14,581 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 145,550 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries (P.T.) 3,780 

Expenses 80 

Total 3,860 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 48,788 

Other Salaries (incl. P/T) 62,367 

Expenses 5,190 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 116,345 

Building Insp./Bd. of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 46,868 

Other Salaries (incl. P/T) 50,261 

Expenses 3,272 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 100,401 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 366. 156 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Maintenance & Operation 

Salary - Superintendent 63,735 

Other Salaries 1,144,050 

Overtime 21,300 

Heating Fuel 214,160 

Electricity 82,068 

Utilities 61,196 

Expenses 248,401 

Furnishings & Equipment 2 . 000 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDING 1.836.910 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 5,200 

Expenses 1,525 

Assistance - Veterans 10, 000 

Total 16,725 

Library 

Salary - Director 43,452 

Other Salaries (incl. P/T) 253,486 

M.V.L.C. 19,814 

Expenses 46,272 

Furnishings & Equipment 6.486 

Total 369,510 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 50,595 



-113' 



Motion by Mark Lutz, "I move that the line item Salary-Director be 
amended to read $50,595 as recommended by the Town Manager in the 
Recreation Department." Much discussion was held concerning the 
need for this position and for the Recreation program to continue 
in the manner in which it has always been run under the present 
Director. Motion seconded and so voted. 



Other Salaries (PT) 



25,381 



Motion by George Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move to amend Other 
Salaries, Recreation (PT) to the amount recommended by Town 
Manager, $25,381." Motion seconded and so voted. 



Expenses 
Total 



2.700 
78,676 



Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (incl. P/T) 

Expenses 

Total 



37,528 
39,699 

30.018 
107,245 



Historical Commission 
Salaries (P.T. ) 
Expenses 
Total 



800 
1. 100 
1,900 



Commission on Disabilities 
Salaries (P.T. ) 
Expenses 
Total 



600 
300 
900 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 
SCHOOLS 



574,956 



Wilmington School Department 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 



TOTAL SCHOOLS 

MATURING DEBT S INTEREST 



13,353,348 
1.458.722 
14.812.070 



Schools 

General Government 



978,609 
89,523 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum 
of $ 89 , 523 be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest - General 
Government; the sum of $ 6, 410 to be raised by transfer from Capital 
Project Closeouts and the balance of $ 83 . 113 to be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



Sewer 
Water 



452,611 
1,019,936 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the 
sum of $1 , 019 , 936 be appropriated for Maturing Debt & Interest - 
Water to be raised by transfer from Water Department - Available 
Funds with zero to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so 
voted . 



Interest on Anticipation Notes & 
Authentication Fee & Misc. Debt. 



86,925 



-114- 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the 
sum of S86.925 be appropriated for Maturing Debt. & Interest- 
Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt; the sum of S3 . 301 to be raised 
by transfer from Water Dept. - Available Funds and the balance of 
S83. 624 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 2.627.604 

UNCLASSIFIED S RESERVE 

Insurance 598,268 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 598. 268 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance; the 
sum of S 84. 286 to be raised by transfer from Water Department Available 
Funds with the balance of $ 513 . 982 to be raised by taxation." 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 2,097,717 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 2 . 097 , 717 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Employee 
Health & Life Insurance; the sum of $ 178, 939 to be raised by transfer 
from Water Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 1 , 918. 778 
to be raised by taxation." 

Veteran's Retirement 33,940 
Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 43,175 
Medicare Employer Contribution 74,517 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$74,517 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve Medicare Employer's 
Contribution; the sum of $ 6, 668 to be raised by transfer from Water 
Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 67 . 849 to be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

Unemployment Payments 
Salary Adjust. & Additional Costs 55,000 
Local Trans . /Training Conferences 6,300 
Out-of-state Travel 1,000 
Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 46,263 
Microfilm Projects 1,000 
Annual Audit 13,900 
Ambulance Billing 10,000 
Town Report 6,000 
Hazardous Material Consulting Service 2,500 
Sewer Maintenance 30,000 
Reserve Fund 71,697 

Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the item Reserve Fund be 
amended by reducing said line item from $122,393 to $71,697." Motion 
seconded and so vote. 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 3.091.277 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 16.638.635 

After the Budget was completed, the Moderator, James Stewart, introduced 
Richard Longo to the Chairman of our Finance Committee, George W. Hooper. Mr. 
Longo then made a presentation to longtime Planning Board member William 
Hooper, who is retiring this year. Mr. Hooper has been a dedicated public 
servant and a plac[ue was presented to him in recognition of all the hours he 
has worked for the good of our community. Congratulations and best wishes 
were extended to him by the Town Meeting applause. 



-115- 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including but 
not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or turn 
in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof: 

(a) Police Department 

Replacement of five police cruisers. 

Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 76,055 for the purchase of five (5) replacement 

police cruisers for the Police Department, and further to authorize the 
sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicles." The Finance 
Committee recommends approval of five cruisers. This is a change from 
original recommendation. Chief Bobby Stewart spoke to the body 
supporting the need for the purchase of five cruisers. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $ 76.055 . 

(b) Fire Department 

Purchase of heavy duty modular type ambulance. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 90 , 000 for the purchase of a heavy duty modular 
type ambulance for the Fire Department and further to authorize the sale 
or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicle; and further to accept any 
gifts, which with the approval of the Selectmen, may be expended for 
this purpose." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $90,000. 

(c) Department of Public Works 

Purchase of two one-ton, two cubic yard, heavy duty dump trucks; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum 
of $ 24. 625 from FY-1994 Public Works - Personal Services - Tree Full 
Time and $ 26. 078 from Public Works - Personal Services - Highway Full 
Time, the entire amount being $ 50,703 for the purpose of purchasing two 
one ton 4x4 two cubic yard, heavy duty dump trucks and further to 
authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicles." 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 50.703 , 
entire amount from transfer. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of one stair lift for the Shawsheen 
Elementary School and to determine how the saune shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 55 . 485 for the purchase and installation of one 
stair lift for the Shawsheen Elementary School." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the construction of sidewalks in various locations throughout the 
town and authorize takings by eminent domain if required and further to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allen, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 61 . 280 for the construction of sidewalks in 
various locations throughout the town and authorize the Town to accept 
as a gift parcels of land required for the construction of said 
sidewalks." Moderator stated we have removed eminent domain and added 
gifts to the motion. Mr. Longo, does this change the dollar amount? 
Answer is No. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $ 61.280 . 



-116- 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the Fy-94 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of various Town 
departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

9A. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to transfer 
the sum of S 15. 326 from FY-1994 Fire Salaries - Privates to the FY-1994 
Fire Salaries - Lieutenants." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

9B. Motion by A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum 
of $ 24, 500 from the FY-1994 Unclassified K Reserve - Insurance Account 
to the following FY-1994 accounts: Public Buildings Electricity - 
$ 5, 500 , Public Buildings Furnishings & Equipment - $ 9,000 , Unclassified 
& Reserve - Medicare - $ 10, 000 . Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

Mr. Jackson requested print-outs be supplied with these amounts for voters at 
future Town Meetings since they are not in Finance Committee booklet. Timing 
issue, is why they are not in booklet, as figures are prepared close to Town 
Meeting. Point well taken and Town Manager agreed. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the 
Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge of said 
observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 5 , 000 for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances." Some discussion on the 
spending of this money. Town Manager explained that majority of this 
money goes for flowers, over $2500, balance on funds go to children 
groups that march in the parade. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, $ 5000 . 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 
of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Marine Corps League 
Clubhouse, on Chestnut Street, for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Marine Corps League; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under 
authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of the Marine Corps League Clubhouse, on Chestnut Street, for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Marine Corps 
League." Finance Committee recommends approval. Mr. Bruce stated that 
this money is returned to the town by these veterans groups in 
appreciation. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 750 . 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 
of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458, on 
Main Street, for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under 
authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458, on Main Street, for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Veterans of Foreign Wars." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 
of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, 
Inc., on Bay Street, for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
American Legion Post 136; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-117- 



Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 750.00 for the purpose of renewing, under 
authority of Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the 
lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., on Bay Street, for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for American Legion Post 
136." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, by transfer, a sum 
of money totalling $250,000 from prior years' overlay surplus in the 
provisions for abatement account to fund overlay deficits for the fiscal years 
1989 and 1993; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to appropriate, by 
transfer, a sum of money totalling $250,000 from prior years' overlay 
surplus in the provisions for abatement account to fund overlay deficits 
for the fiscal year's 1989 and 1993." Finance Committee recommends 
approval . 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #23) To see if the Town will accept as Town ways, the 
layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as amended) and 
shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are available in the office of the Town 
Engineer and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for 
the payment of any damages from the ta)cingB of land and slope easements and 
other easements therefore: 

a. Earles Row - From Route 62 a distance of 820 feet, more or less, 
northeasterly, to a dead end as shown on a definitive subdivision plan 
entitled Hamilton Woods and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Plan Book 161, Plan 108 on September 29, 1987, and as shown on a 
street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. Anderson, Inc. dated July 
20, 1992. 

b. Gatehouse Lane - From Towpath Drive a distance of 380 feet, more or 
less, southwesterly to a dead end as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Chestnut Estates II, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 166, Plan 20 on August 25, 1988 and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. 
dated October 6, 1987. 

c. Allenhurst Way - From Woburn Street a distance of 1,161 feet, more or 
less, westerly to a dead end as shown on a definitive subdivision plan 
entitled Allenhurst Farm and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Plan Book 164, Plan 109 on May 12, 1988, and as shown on a street 
acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. dated January 27, 
1994. 

d. Oxbow Drive - From Woburn Street a distance of 1,751 feet, more or less, 
easterly to a dead end as shown on a definitive subdivision plan 
entitled Ox Pasture, and recorded at Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 161, Plan 64 on September 18, 1987 and as shown on a street 
acceptance plan prepared by Erich Nitzsche, Robert E. Anderson dated 
August 4, 1986; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-118- 



Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, "I move that the Town accept as Town ways, 
layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M.G.L. Ch. 82 as 
amended) and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in 
accordance with the "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of 
Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts," and which plans are 
recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of 
which are available in the office of the Town Engineer and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain such land, 
slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this Article, and to vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $100 for the purpose of construction of said ways 
and for the payment of any dounages from the takings of land and slope 
easements and other easements therefore:" the description of the streets 
is the Seune as above. Question was asked as to difference between 
accepted and unaccepted streets. Alan Altman, Town Counsel answer 
questions relative to the Town providing services on all public ways, 
and doing minor repairs as opposed to these streets in this article 
being accepted, as they have satisfied Planning Board rules and 
regulations. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #16) To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington," as follows: 

Motion by Bernard Nally, Chairman of By-Law Study Committee, "I move 
that the Town vote to amend the "Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington", by deleting in each of the following Chapters 
and Sections identified as "By-Law in Effect" and substituting therefore 
the "Proposed Change to the By-Law" as indicated herein as follows, each 
Chapter and Section to be considered separately." 



PROPOSED CHANGES ARE UNDERLINED 
CHAPTER 2 SECTION 19 - QUORUM 
BY-LAW IN EFFECT. 

One hundred and fifty voters at a Town Meeting shall constitute a quorum, 
except for a motion to adjourn for which no quorum shall be required; provided 
that no vote shall be held invalid by reason of lack of the required quorum, 
unless the records of the Town Clerk of the meeting show that before the 
result of such vote was declared the c[uestion of the presence of a quorum was 
duly raised and that such records shown that the recjuired c[uorum was lacking. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

One hundred and fifty voters at a Town Meeting shall be recruired to start the 
business of the Town including each adjourned session thereof and then no 
other quorum shall be reguired to conduct business. 

Mr. Nally explained in regard to Quorum, many surrounding towns have gone to 
zero quorum and their meetings are better attended then with quorum 
requirements. At a recent special Town Meeting, because of people leaving the 
meeting almost had to be canceled. Mr. Charles Gilbert, Church Street 
disapproved, also Selectman Chester Bruce. Rocco DePasquale against this 
reduction, perhaps we should go to representative Town Meeting. Ted Tripp 
stated we are giving up piece of democracy. Martha Stevenson, could the 
trouble be with when we have Town Meeting and Town Election. Selectmen Robert 
Cain and Dick Elliott, Lucaya Circle support the change. 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and voted. Required a 
majority. Yes 98 No 48 



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CHAPTER 3 SECTION 1 - DUTIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 



BY-LAW IN EFFECT. 

All boards, committees, commissions or trustees, the members of which are 
elected by ballot or appointed under the provisions of "The Town Manager Act" 
Chapter 592, Section 2, Acts of 1950, whether the board commission or 
authority is a state body politic or otherwise, shall hold a regular meeting 
at least once each month, and shall keep records exactly and in detail of all 
motions made, votes passed and business transacted at each such meeting. All 
such records shall be kept in a bound book or a loose leaf book, suitable for 
permanent binding of standard form. One copy shall be forwarded monthly to 
the appointing authority. 

Said books shall, unless otherwise provided by law, be open to public 
inspection at any reasonable time, but shall remain during such inspection 
under supervision of the officer, board, committee, commission or trustee 
having custody thereof. 

The minutes of meetings for the calendar year just completed shall be turned 
over to the Town Clerk on or before January 15, for safe keeping and permanent 
record. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

All boards, committees, commissions or trustees, the members of which are 
elected by ballot or appointed under the provisions of "The Town Manager Act" 
Chapter 592, Section 2, Acts of 1950, whether the board, commission or 
authority is a state body politic or otherwise, shall hold a regular meeting 
at least once each month, unless an approved request for a waiver from this 
schedule has been approved by the Appointing Authority and shall keep records 
exactly and in detail of all motions made, votes passed and business 
transacted at each such meeting. All such records shall be kept in a bound 
book or a loose leaf book, suitable for permanent binding of standard form. 
One copy shall be forwarded monthly to the appointing authority. 

Said books shall, unless otherwise provided by law, be open to public 
inspection at any reasonable time, but shall remain during such inspection 
under supervision of the officer, board, committee, commission or trustee 
having custody thereof. 

The minutes of meetings for the calendar year just completed shall be turned 
over to the Town Clerk on or before January 15, for safe keeping and permanent 
record. 

Mr. Nally stated this change is needed since some boards and committees just 
do not need to meet as often as this wording requires. The way this bylaw is 
worded they are in violation by not meeting. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

CHAPTER 3 SECTION 15 - EASEMENTS 

BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

The Selectmen may accept from time to time in behalf of the Town the right of 
easement for the purposes of storm drains, pedestrian walkways, streets, and 
retaining walls, provided such right of easement is made by a good and 
sufficient instrument executed by the donor in proper form to be recorded in 
the Registry of Deeds. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

The Selectmen may accept from time to time in behalf of the Town the right of 
easement for the purposes of storm drains, pedestrian walkways, streets and 
retaining walls, provided such right of easement is made by a good and 
sufficient instrument executed by the donor in proper form to be recorded in 
the Registry of Deeds. 



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In addition thereto, the Planning Board may accept conveyances of street 
easements and utilities and other appurtenances relative to sub-divisions. 

Mr. Nally stated this is a housekeeping article also, assists Planning Board 
in their work when developing sub-divisions. This does not impact on paper 
streets. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

CHAPTER 4 SECTION 4 - FINANCE COMMITTEE 
BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

The committee shall, seven days prior to any Town Meeting at which Articles 
contained in the Warrant are to be acted upon, prepare, publish and distribute 
by leaving copies thereof in the Office of the Town Clerk, their report and 
recommendations on such Articles which involve the transfer, raising and 
appropriation of monies. For each Annual Town Meeting for the transaction of 

Business, such reports and recommendations shall show in detail the 

anticipated income and expenditures of the Town for the then current year and 
copies thereof shall at least seven days prior to such meeting be mailed to 
the registered voters of the Town. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

The committee shall, seven days prior to any Town Meeting at which Articles 
contained in the Warrant are to be acted upon, prepare, publish and distribute 
by leaving copies thereof in the Office of the Town Clerk, their report and 
recommendations on such Articles which involve the transfer, raising and 
appropriation of monies. For each Annual Town Meeting for the transaction of 
business, such reports and recommendations shall show in detail the 
anticipated income and expenditures of the Town for the then current year and 
copies thereof shall at least seven days prior to such meeting be mailed to 
the registered voters of the Town. 

This report shall also contain recommendations of the Planning Board pertinent 
to Planning Board matters. 

Mr. Nally, this change is to put Planning Board recommendations in the Finance 
Committee booklet sent to voters prior to Town Meeting. This has already been 
done for this 1994 Finance Committee booklet. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. So voted, unanimously. 

CHAPTER 5 SECTION 4 - DEFACING PROPERTY - SIGNS 
BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

Except as in accordance with the provisions of the Zoning By-Laws of the Town 
of Wilmington, no person shall in any manner affix posters or signs or 
advertisements, whether for political purposes or for other purposes, upon 
town property, real or personal, or upon the poles and other equipment of 
utilities located within the limits of Town ways. 

Temporary political signs are hereby restricted in size to six (6) 
square feet of surface area. One sign may be mounted only upon properly 
registered and insured motor vehicles, or one free standing sign of the 
same size may be placed on private property not less than 25 feet from 
the edge of the nearest paved roadway. Signs may NOT be exhibited more 
than 45 days prior to election and MUST be removed within 3 days after 
the election. 

Violations of this by-law shall be punishable by a $50 fine per sign, per day. 
Compliance of this section is the responsibility of the property owner and 
shall be enforced by the Police Department. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

Except as in accordance with the provisions of the Zoning By-Laws of the Town 
of Wilmington, no person shall in any manner affix posters or signs or 
advertisements, whether for political purposes or for other purposes, upon 



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town property, real or personal, or upon the poles and other equipment of 
utilities located within the limits of Town ways. 



Temporary political signs are hereby restricted in size to six (6) 
square feet of surface area. One free standing sign of the same size 
may be placed on private property not less than 25 feet from the edge of 
the nearest paved roadway. Temporary signs may be mounted only upon 
properly registered and insured motor vehicles. Signs may NOT be 
exhibited more than 45 days prior to election and MUST be removed within 
3 days after the election. 

Violations of this by-law shall be punishable by a $50 fine per sign, per day. 
Compliance of this section is the responsibility of the property owner and 
shall be enforced by the Police Department. 

Mr. Nally, this change is the size and number of signs put on motor vehicle 
which the Police could not enforce. This clarifies sign section of the by- 
law. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 



CHAPTER 5 SECTION 14 - CURFEW 
BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

No child under the age of sixteen years shall be, loiter or remain in or upon 
any street or other public place in this town between the hours of nine 
o'clock in the evening and five o'clock in the forenoon, unless such child is 
accompanied by or under the control of a parent, guardian or other person 
having the legal custody or care of such child, or unless in the performance 
or returning from the performance of an errand or duty directed by such 
parent, guardian or other person having legal custody or care of such a child, 
or unless in the performance of or going to or returning from some lawful 
employment or duty; and no such child while performing such errand, duty or 
employment or while going to or returning from the performance thereof, shall 
loiter or remain upon any such street or other public place within said period 
of time. The Chief of the Fire Department shall cause two blows to be sounded 
on the fire alarm system at nine o'clock in the evening as notification of 
this by-law. 

The Chief of Police shall keep a record of violations of this by-law and shall 
cause to be notified thereof one of the parents, guardian or other person 
having the legal custody or care of such child. 

Mr. Nally, curfew section is unconstitutional. By-law is useless and we would 
like to replace this section by deleting curfew and replacing with a bylaw 
dealing with spray paint. By-law deals with possession of spray paint by 
minors. The purpose is to restrict possession to cut down on vandalism. 
This does not limit minors from working in places where paint is sold. Peggy 
Kane stated that schools should be notified of this bylaw. The word ordinance 
in the Article should be changed to By-Law. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 70 No 57 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW - DELETE SECTION 

AND REPLACE AS SECTION 14 - SALE OF SPRAY PAINT TO MINORS; 

a. No person shall knowingly sell to any child under eighteen (18) years of 
age any aerosol container of paint capable of defacing property. 

b. For purposes herein, bona fide evidence of majority, identity of 
majority and identity of a person is a document issued by a federal, state, 
county or municipal government, or subdivision or agency thereof, including, 
but not limited to. a motor vehicle operator's license, a registration 
certificate issued under the Federal Selective Service Act (50 App. U.S.C. 
*451 et sec), identification card issued to a member of the Armed Forces or a 
birth certificate. Proof that the defendant, or his employee or agent, 
demanded, was shown and acted in reliance upon such bona fide evidence in any 
sale transaction forbidden hereby, shall be a defense to any criminal 
prosecution therefor. 



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c. Any person who owns, manages or OTserates a place of business wherein 
aerosol containers of paint capable of defacing property are sold shall 
conspicuously post notice of this law in such place of business in letters at 
least one inch (1") high. 

d. Any person violating the provisions of this By-law shall be fined not 
less than fifty dollars (S50.00) nor more than two hundred fS200.00) for each 
offense. 

POSSESSION AND MANUFACTURE OF SPRAY PAINT BY MINORS; 

a. It shall be illegal for any person under eighteen (18) years of age to 
possess and manufacture any aerosol container of paint capable of defacing 
property, unless otherwise accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. 

b. Any person under the age of eighteen (18) found violating the provisions 
of this By-law shall be fined not less than fifty dollars (S50.00) nor more 
than two hundred ($200.00) for each offense. 

c. Possession shall be defined as having on or about a person, spray 
propellant type paint unless otherwise accompanied by a parent or legal 
guardian. 

d. Exemption - Nothing in this By-law shall prohibit the employment of a 
person under age 18, in or by a commercial business involving the manufacture, 
distribution, or sale of said spray paint devices. 

CHAPTER 5 SECTION 28 - CONFINEMENT AND NOTICE 

BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

Any dog found to be at large in violation of this Town By-law shall be 
apprehended and confined by the Dog Officer or any police officer who shall 
forthwith serve upon the owner or keeper of said dog, in hand or by leaving at 
the last and usual place of abode of said owner or keeper, a citation that 
shall state (1) that such violation has been committed; (2) the time and 
place of such violation; (3) that such violation will be referred to the 
district court for prosecution in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 140, 
Section 173A; (4) that said dog shall be turned over to a Humane Society. 

In no case shall a dog be sold or delivered to any person or organization 
intending to use said dog for vivisection purposes. 

After a complaint has been made to the Dog Officer, the owner or keeper found 
in violation of this section will be liable to a fine of ten ($10) 
dollars for the first offense and twenty-five ($25) dollars for subsequent 
offenses as provided in the General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 136A-175. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO THE BY-LAW 

Any dog found to be at large in violation of this Town By-law shall be 
apprehended and confined by the Dog Officer or any police officer who shall 
forthwith serve upon the owner or keeper of said dog, in hand or by leaving at 
the last and usual place of abode of said owner or keeper a citation that 
shall state (1) that such violation has been committed; (2) the time and 
place of such violation; (3) that such violation will be referred to the 
district court for prosecution in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 140, 
Section 173A; (4) that said dog shall be turned over to a Humane Society. 

In no case shall a dog be sold or delivered to any person or organization 
intending to use said dog for vivisection purposes. 

After a complaint has been made to the Dog Officer, the owner or keeper found 
in violation of this Section will be liable to a fine of ten ($10) dollars for 
the first offense and twenty-five ($25) dollars for subsequent offenses as 
provided in the General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 136A-175. 



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ADD TO ABOVE 

and in addition to the above the owner shall be responsible for any related 
costs as a result of confinement of the owner's dog or dogs, said amount not 
to exceed the sum provided by General Law. 

Mr. Nally, this section deals with Dog Officer when she must seize a dog, we 
are proposing that these additional costs must be paid by the owner. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 



CHAPTER 5 SECTION 35 - NO PERSON SHALL LOITER 
BY-LAW IN EFFECT 

No person shall stand or loiter in or on any street, sidewalk or public place 
in such a manner as to obstruct the free passage of travelers thereon; nor 
shall any person on such street, sidewalk or public place, after being 
directed by a police officer to move on and disperse, on a same or subsequent 
day reassemble to loiter or remain so as to obstruct the free passage of 
travelers or motor vehicles; provided, however, that nothing herein contained 
shall be construed to deny the rights of peaceful picketing. 

It shall be the duty of any police officer of the Town of Wilmington to order 
any persons offending against provisions of this section to move on and 
disperse and if the person so ordered or requested does not forthwith obey, to 
remove them, or to arrest and cause them to be brought before the Justice of 
the Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and a complaint to be made 
against provisions of the preceding sentence. 

PROPOSED CHANGE TO BY-LAW - DELETE SECTION 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Mr. Nally, we would move to delete, as this section is unconstitutional. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 17. (#26) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or Town Manager to petition the Great and General Court for the 
purpose of amending Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950 - An Act Establishing a 
Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of Wilmington by deleting Section 
2A contained therein (Recall of Elected Officers) and substituting the 
following: 

SECTION 2A - RECALL OF ELECTED OFFICERS. 
IN EFFECT 

Any person who holds an elected town office with more than six months 
remaining of the term of office may be recalled from the office by the voters 
in the manner, as herein provided. 

(a) One hundred and fifty or more voters may file with the Town Clerk 
an affidavit containing the name of the officer whose recall is sought and a 
statement of the grounds upon which the petition is based. The signatures on 
such petition shall contain the names of at least ten voters in each of the 
precincts into which the town is divided for the purpose of electing town 
officers. If the said petition is found to be valid the Town Clerk shall 
thereupon deliver to the ten persons first named on such petition, petition 
blanks demanding said recall, printed forms of which he shall keep available. 
The blanks may be completed by printing or typewriting; they shall be 
addressed to the Board of Selectmen; they shall contain the names of the ten 
persons to whom they are issued and the grounds for recall as stated in the 
affidavit; they shall demand the election of a successor to the office; they 
shall be dated and signed by the Town Clerk. The recall petition shall be 
returned to the Town Clerk within twenty days following the date they are 
issued, signed by at least ten percent of the total number of persons 
registered to vote as of the date of the most recent town election. The Town 



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Clerk shall within twenty-four hours following such filing with hitn . submit 
the petitions to the Board of Registrars of Voters which shall within five 
days thereafter , certify thereon the number of signatures which are names of 
voters. 

(b) If the petitions shall be certified by the Registrars of Voters to 
be sufficient, the Town Clerk shall forthwith submit the same with his 
certificate to the Board of Selectmen. Upon its receipt of the certified 
petition the Board of Selectmen shall forthwith give notice, in writing, of 
said petition to the officer whose recall is sought. If said officer does not 
resign his office within five days following delivery of the said notice, the 
Board of Selectmen shall order a special election to be held not less than 
sixty-five nor more than ninety days after the date of the certification of 
the Town Clerk that the petition is sufficient. If a vacancy occurs in the 
office after a recall election has been ordered, the election shall 
nevertheless proceed as provided in this section, but only the ballots for 
candidates need be counted. 

(c) The nomination of candidates, the publication of the warrant for 
the recall election and the conduct of the recall election shall 
be in accordance with the Charter and General Laws regulating 
elections. 

(d) Ballots used at the recall election shall state the proposition 
in the order indicated: 

For the recall of (name of officer) 
Against the recall of (name of officer) 

Adjacent to each proposition shall be a place to vote for either of said 
propositions. After the said proposition shall appear the word "candidates" 
and the name of the candidates arranged as determined by a drawing by lot 
conducted by the Town Clerk which shall be open to the public, unless another 
arrangement is required by a general law. If a majority of the votes cast on 
the proposition is against the recall the votes for candidates need not be 
counted. If the majority of the votes cast is in favor of recall the votes 
for candidates shall be counted and candidates receiving the highest number of 
votes shall be declared elected. 

(e) The incumbent shall continue to hold his office and to perform his 
duties until the recall election. If he is not then recalled he shall 
continue in office for the remainder of his unexpired term. If the officer is 
recalled he shall be deemed removed upon the certification of the election 
results. The candidate who received the highest number of votes shall serve 
for the balance of the unexpired term. 

(f) No recall shall be filed against an officer within six months after 
he takes office, or in the case of an officer subjected to recall and not 
recalled thereby, during the remainder of his unexpired term. 

PROPOSED CHANGE 

Any person who holds an elected town office with more than six months 
remaining of the term of office may be recalled from the office by the voters 
in the manner, as herein provided. 

(a) One hundred and fifty or more voters may file with the Town Clerk 
an affidavit containing the name of the officer whose recall is sought and a 
statement of the grounds upon which the petition is based. The signatures on 
such petition shall contain the names of at least ten voters in each of the 
precincts into which the town is divided for the purpose of electing town 
officers. If the said petition is found to be valid the Town Clerk shall 
thereupon deliver to the ten persons first named on such petition, petition 
blanks demanding said recall, printed forms of which he shall keep available. 
The blanks may be completed by printing or typewriting; they shall be 
addressed to the Board of Selectmen; they shall contain the names of the ten 
persons to whom they are issued and the grounds for recall as stated in the 
affidavit; they shall demand the election of a successor to the office; they 
shall be dated and signed by the Town Clerk. The recall petition shall be 
returned to the Town Clerk within twenty days following the date they are 
issued, signed by at least ten percent of the total number of persons 
registered to vote as of the date of the most recent town election. The Town 
Clerk shall within four (4) working days, commencing the day after submission 
with him/her submit the petitions to the Board of Registrars which shall 
within seven (7) working days, certify thereon the number of signatures which 
are names of voters. 



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(h) If the petitions shall be certified by the Reqietrara of Votera to 
be sufficient, the Town Clerk shall within five (5) working days, or at the 
next meeting of the Board of Selectmen submit the same with his/her 
certification. Upon its receipt of the certified petition the Board of 
Selectmen shall within two (2^ working days, give notice, in writing, of said 
petition to the officer whose recall is sought. If said officer does not 
resign his office within five (5) working days following delivery of said 
notice, the Board of Selectmen shall order a special election to be held not 
less than sixty-five nor more than ninety days after the date of the 
certification of the Town Clerk that the petition is sufficient. 

add (g) The validation and the call for election certifies only compliance 
with the procedural reguirements of this Act; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Bernard Nally, I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to petition the Great and 
General Court for the purpose of amending Chapter 592 of the Acts of 
1950, as amended by Chapter 599 of the Acts of 1981 - An Act 
Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Wilmington by deleting Section 2A, subsection (a) and (b) contained 
therein (Recall of Elected Officers) and substituting the following 
subsections (a) and (b) and adding subsection (g) hereby ratifying and 
confirming the remaining sections of Chapter 592, said amendment to take 
effect upon enactment thereof. 

Mr. Nally, this is an article to change only procedural process of the Recall. 
The actual content and thrust of the recall does not change in any way. The 
By-law Study committee listened to Board of Registrars, Town Clerk and 
Selectmen in regards to problems that came about when the Recall election was 
called. What we have done is give the people the time they need to actually 
do their jobs. Finance Committee recommends approval. Peggy Kane, Hanover 
Street, she thought the Committee was going to look at the charges that bring 
about recall, and change that section to do with the charges. Mr. Nally 
stated Committee did look at this and determined that the voter is the one who 
has the final say in this process of recall, as to the decision if the charges 
are valid. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn #11) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By- 
laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington by adding Section 41 to 
Section 5. 

WETLANDS PROTECTION 

SECTION 41.1. - Purpose 

The purpose of this by-law is to protect the wetlands, related water 
resources, and adjoining land areas in the Town of Wilmington by controlling 
activities deemed by the Conservation Commission likely to have a significant 
or cumulative effect upon resource area values, including but not limited to 
the following: public or private water supply, ground water, flood control, 
erosion and sedimentation control, storm damage prevention, water quality, 
water pollution control, fisheries, wildlife habitat, rare species habitat 
including rare plant species, and recreation values deemed important to the 
community (collectively, the "resource area values protected by this by-law"). 
This by-law is intended to utilize the Home Rule authority of this 
municipality to protect additional resource areas, for additional values, with 
additional standards and procedures more comprehensive than those of the 
Wetlands Protection Act, M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40 and Regulations thereunder, 
310 CMR 10.00. 

SECTION 41.2 - Jurisdiction 

Except as permitted by the Conservation Commiaaion or as provided in 
this by-law, no person shall commence to remove, fill, dredge, build upon, 
degrade, discharge into, disturb vegetation or otherwise alter the following 
resource areas: any freshwater wetlands; marshes; wet meadows; bogs; swamps; 



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vernal pools; banks; reservoirs; lakes; ponds; rivers; streeuns; lands under 
waterbodies; lands subject to flooding or inundation by ground water or 
surface water; and lands within 100 feet of any of the aforesaid resource 
areas (collectively the "resource areas protected by the by-law"). Said 
resource areas shall be protected whether or not they border surface waters. 

SECTION 41.3 - Conditional Exceptions 

The application and permit required by this by-law shall not be recpiired 
for maintaining, repairing, or replacing, but not substantially changing or 
enlarging, an existing and lawfully located structure or facility used in the 
service of the public to provide electric, gas, sewer, water, telephone, 
telegraph, or other telecommunication services, provided that written notice 
has been given to the Commission prior to commencement of work, and provided 
that the work conforms to performance standards in regulations adopted by the 
Commission. 

The application and permit required by this by-law shall not be required 
for emergency projects necessary for the protection of the health and safety 
of the public, provided that the work is to be performed by or has been 
ordered to be performed by an agency of the Commonwealth or a political 
subdivision thereof; provided that advance notice, oral or written, has been 
given to the Commission prior to commencement of work or within 24 hours after 
commencement; provided that the Commission or its agent certifies the work as 
an emergency project; provided that the work is performed only for the time 
and place certified by the Commission for the limited purposes necessary to 
abate the emergency; and provided that within 21 days of commencement of an 
emergency project a permit application shall be filed with the Commission for 
review as provided by this by-law. Upon failure to meet these and other 
requirements of the Commission, the Commission, may, after notice and a public 
hearing, revoke or modify an emergency project approval and order restoration 
and mitigation measures. 

Other than stated in this section, the exceptions provided in the 
Wetlands Protection Act, M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and Regulations, CMR 10.00., 
shall not apply under this bylaw. 

SECTION 41.4 - Applications for Permits and Requests for Determination 

Any person desiring to know whether or not a proposed activity or an 
area is subject to this by-law may in writing request a determination from the 
Commission. Such a Request for Determination (RFD) shall include information 
and plans as are deemed necessary by the Commission. 

Written application shall be filed with the Commission to perform 
activities affecting resource areas protected by the by-law. The permit 
application shall include such information and plans as are deemed necessary 
by the Commission to describe proposed activities and their effects on the 
resource areas protected by this bylaw. Except as noted in Section 3, no 
activities shall commence without receiving and complying with a permit issued 
pursuant to this by-law. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may accept as the permit 
application and plans under this by-law the Notice of Intent and plans filed 
under the Wetlands Protection Act., M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and Regulations, 
310 CMR 10.00. 

SECTION 41.5. - Notice and Hearings 

Any person filing a permit application or a request for determination 
with the Commission at the same time shall give written notice thereof, by 
certified mail (return receipt rec[uested) or hand delivered, to all abutters 
at their mailing addresses shown on the most recent applicable tax list of the 
assessors, including owners of land directly opposite on any public or private 
street or way, and abutters to the abutters, and any other owners of land 
within 100 feet including any in another municipality or across a body of 
water. The notice to abutters shall have enclosed a copy of the public 
notice. An affidavit of the person providing such notice, with a copy of the 
notice mailed or delivered, shall be filed with the Commission. When a person 



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requesting a determination is other than the owner, the request, the notice of 
the hearing, and the determination itself shall be sent by the applicant to 
the owner. 

The notice and hearing requirements required by this section may be 
waived for certain minor projects and specified in the regulations issued 
pursuant to this bylaw. 

The Commission shall conduct a public hearing on any permit application 
or request for determination, with written notice given at the expense of the 
applicant, five business days prior to the hearing, in a newspaper of general 
circulation in the municipality. 

The Commission shall commence the public hearing within 21 days from 
receipt of a completed permit application or RFD unless an extension is 
authorized in writing by the applicant. 

The Commission shall issue its permit or determination in writing within 
21 days of the close of the public hearing thereon unless an extension is 
authorized in writing by the applicant. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine its hearing under this 
by-law with the hearing conducted under the Wetlands Protection Act, M.G.L. 
Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

The Commission shall have the authority to continue the hearing to a 
certain date announced at the hearing, for reasons stated at the hearing, 
which may include receipt of additional information from the applicant or 
others deemed necessary by the Commission in its discretion, or conunents and 
recommendations of the boards and officials listed in Section 6. The 
Commission may rec[uire the notice provisions specified in this section to be 
repeated for any continued hearing. 



SECTION 41.6. - Permits and Conditions 

If the Commission, after a public hearing, determines that the 
activities which are subject to the permit application or the land and water 
uses which will result therefrom are likely to have an individual or 
cumulative effect upon the resource area values protected by the by-law, the 
Commission, within 21 days of the close of the hearing, shall issue or deny a 
permit for the activities requested. If it issues a permit, the Commission 
shall impose conditions which the Commission deems necessary or desirable to 
protect those values, and all activities shall be done in accordance with 
those conditions. 

The Commission shall take into account the cumulative adverse effects of 
loss, degradation, isolation, and replication of protected resource areas 
throughout the community and the watershed, resulting from past activities, 
permitted and exempt, and foreseeable future activities. 

The Commission is empowered to deny a permit for failure to meet the 
requirements of this by-law; for failure to submit necessary information and 
plans requested by the Commission; for failure to meet the design 
specifications, performance standards, and other recjuirements in regulations 
of the Commission; for failure to avoid or prevent unacceptable significant or 
cumulative effects upon the resource area values protected by this by-law; and 
where no conditions are adequate to protect those values. Due consideration 
shall be given to any demonstrated hardship on the applicant by reason of 
denial, as presented at the public hearing. 

Lands within 100 feet of specific resource areas are presumed important 
to the protection of these resources because activities undertaken in close 
proximity to wetlands and other resources have a high likelihood of adverse 
impact upon the wetland or other resource, either immediately, as a 
consequence of construction, or over time, as a consecjuence of daily operation 
or existence of the activities. These adverse impacts from construction and 
use can include, without limitation, erosion, siltation, loss of groundwater 
recharge, poor water quality, and loss of wildlife habitat. The Commission 



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therefore shall require that the applicant maintain a 15 foot strip of 
continuous undisturbed vegetative cover and an additional 10 foot structure 
setback extending from wetland resource areas with the exception of land 
subject to flooding. 

To prevent wetlands loss, the Commission shall require applicants to 
avoid wetlands alteration wherever feasible; shall minimize wetlands 
alteration; and, where alteration is unavoidable, shall require full 
mitigation. The Commission may authorize or rec[uire replication of wetlands 
as a form of mitigation, but only with adequate security, professional design, 
and monitoring to assure success, because of the high likelihood of failure or 
replication. 

A permit shall expire three years from the date of issuance. 
Notwithstanding the above, the Commission in its discretion may issue a permit 
expiring five years from the date of issuance for recurring or continuous 
work, provided that annual notification of time and location of work is given 
to the Commission. Any permit may be renewed once for an additional one year 
period, provided that a request for a renewal is received in writing by the 
Commission prior to expiration. Notwithstanding the above, a permit may 
contain requirements which shall be enforceable for a stated number of years, 
indefinitely, or until permanent protection is in place, and shall apply to 
all owners of the land. 

For good cause the Commission may revoke or modify a permit or 
determination issued under this by-law after notice to the holder of the 
permit or determination, notice to the public, abutters, and town boards, 
pursuant to Section 5 and a public hearing. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine the permit or 
determination issued under this by-law with the Order of Conditions or 
Determination of Applicability issued under the Wetlands Protection Act, 
M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

No work proposed in any permit application shall be undertaken until the 
permit issued by the Commission with respect to such work has been recorded in 
the registry of deeds or, if the land affected is registered land, in the 
registry section of the Land Court for the district wherein the land lies, and 
until the holder of the permit certifies in writing to the Commission that the 
permit has been recorded. 

SECTION 41.7. - Regulations 

After public notice and public hearing, the Commission shall promulgate 
rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this by-law. Failure by 
the Commission to promulgate such rules and regulations or a legal declaration 
of their invalidity by a court of law shall not act to suspend or invalidate 
the effect of this by-law. 

SECTION 41.8. - Definitions 

The following definitions shall apply to the interpretation and 
implementation of this by-law. 

The term "person" shall include any individual, group of individuals, 
association, partnership, corporation, company, business organization, trust, 
estate, the Commonwealth or political subdivision thereof to the extent 
subject to town by-laws, administrative agency, public or quasi-public 
corporation or body, this municipality, and any other legal entity, its legal 
representatives, agents, or assigns. 

The term "alter" shall include, without limitation, the following 
activities when undertaken to, upon, within or affecting resource areas 
protected by this by-law: 

1. Removal, excavation, or dredging of soil, sand, gravel, or 
aggregate materials of any kind; 



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2. Changing of pre-existing drainage characteristics, flushing 
characteristics, salinity distribution, sedimentation patterns, 
flow patterns, or flood retention characteristics; 

3. Drainage, or other disturbance of water level or water table; 

4. Dumping, discharging, or filling with any material which may 
degrade water quality; 

5. Placing of fill, or removal of material, which would alter 
elevation; 

6. Driving of piles, erection, or repair of buildings, or 
structures of any kind; 

7. Placing of obstructions or objects in water; 

8. Destruction of plant life including cutting of trees; 

9. Changing temperature, biochemical oxygen demand, or other 
physical, biological, or chemical characteristics of any waters; 

10. Any activities, changes, or work which may cause or tend to 
contribute to pollution of any body of water or ground water; 

11. Application of pesticides or herbicides; 

12. Incremental activities which have, or may have, a cumulative 
adverse impact on the resource areas protected by this by-law. 

Except as otherwise provided in this by-law or in regulations of the 
Commission, the definitions of terms in this by-law shall be as set forth in 
the Wetlands Protection Act, M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and Regulations, 310 CMR 
10.00. 

SECTION 41.9. - Security 

As part of a permit issued under this by-law, in addition to any 
security rec[uired by any other municipal or state board, agency, or official, 
the Commission may require that the performance and observance of the 
conditions imposed thereunder (including conditions requiring mitigation work) 
be secured wholly or in part by one or more of the methods listed below: 

1. By a proper bond or deposit of money or negotiable 
securities or other undertaking of financial responsibility 
sufficient in the opinion of the Commission, to be released 
in whole or in part upon issuance of a Certificate of 
Compliance for work performed pursuant to the permit; this 
method shall only be used for projects which propose or 
require wetland replication or restoration. 

2. By a conservation restriction, easement, or other covenant 
enforceable in a court of law, executed and duly recorded by the owner 
of record, running with the land to the benefit of this municipality 
whereby the permit conditions shall be performed and observed before any 
lot may be conveyed other than by a mortgage deed. This method shall be 
used only with the consent of the applicant. 

SECTION 41.10. - Enforcement 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise 
alter resource areas protected by this by-law, or cause, suffer, or allow such 
activity, or leave in place unauthorized fill, or otherwise fail to restore 
illegally altered land to its original condition, or fail to comply with a 
permit of an enforcement order issued pursuant to this by-law. 

The Commission, its agents, officers, and employees shall have authority 
to enter upon privately owned land for the purpose of performing their duties 
under this by-law and may make or cause to be made such examination, surveys, 
or sampling as the Commission deems necessary, subject to the constitutions 
and laws of the United States and the Commonwealth. 

The Commission shall have the authority to enforce this by-law, its 
regulations, and permits issued thereunder by violation notices, 
administrative orders, and civil and criminal court actions. Any person who 
violates provisions of this by-law may be ordered to restore the property to 
its original condition and take other action deemed necessary to remedy such 
violations, or may be fined, or both. 



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Upon request of the Commission, the Board of Selectman and the Town 
Counsel shall take legal action for enforcement under civil law. Upon request 
of the Commission, the Chief of Police shall take legal action for enforcement 
under criminal law. 

Any person who violates any provision of this by-law, or regulations, 
permits, or administrative orders issued thereunder, shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than $300. Each day or portion thereof during which a 
violation continues, or unauthorized fill or other alteration remains in 
place, shall constitute a separate offense, and each provision of the by-law, 
regulations, permits, or administrative orders violated shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution in a specific case, the 
Commission may issue citations under the non-criminal disposition procedure 
set forth in M.G.L. Ch. 40, Sec. 21D. 

SECTION 41.11. - Burden of Proof 

The applicant for a permit shall have the burden of proving by a 
preponderance of the credible evidence that the work proposed in the permit 
application will not have unacceptable significant or cumulative effect upon 
the resource area values protected by this by-law. Failure to provide 
adequate evidence to the Commission supporting this burden shall be sufficient 
cause for the Commission to deny a permit or grant a permit with conditions. 

SECTION 41.12. - Appeals 

A decision of the Commission shall be reviewable in the Superior Court 
in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 249, Sec. 4. 

SECTION 41.13. - Relation to the Wetlands Protection Act 

This bylaw is adopted under the Home Rule Amendment of the Massachusetts 
Constitution and the Home Rule statutes, independent of the Wetlands 
Protection Act, M.G.L. Ch. 131, Sec. 40, and Regulations 310 CMR 10.00, 
thereunder. 

SECTION 41.14. - Severability 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this by-law shall not 
invalidate any other section or provision thereof, nor shall it invalidate any 
permit or determination which previously has been issued; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Gary Mercier, Conservation Commission Chairman, reads the same 
as Article above with two exceptions. It should read adding Chapter 41 
to Chapter 5 , and also adding SECTION 41.15. - Effective date Not 
withstanding any law to the contrary, the effective date of this By-Law 
December 1, 1994. Motion accepted as main motion. Seconded. Planning 
Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. Anne Gagnon, 
Conservation presented slides concerning wetlands and an explanation as 
to what wetlands are. Gary Mercier stated there is a need to protect 
our wetlands and greater local control is needed. Residents have come 
to them saying we are not doing enough to protect wetlands. We are 
seeing more and more building around wetlands. Many towns have local 
by-laws. DEP supports local by-laws. This by-law will add to state 
regulations and give town added protection. Jim Morris, Conservation 
Commission member, existing uses that are not violations will not become 
violations, existing permits will not be effected, no change in fees and 
paper work and also minor projects will not be adversely effected. This 
contains the same appeal process as all other by-laws in the Town and 
also we are adding a Town based mediation process. 

Many residents spoke for and against this by-law. Lynn Guzinski, Conservation 
Commission does not support by-law; William Gately, Conservation Commission, 
wetlands are under stress, he supports this by-law. Motion to move question 
was approved Yes 293 to No 2. Vote on the main motion was then taken. Vote 
was Yes 128 No 189. Article fails. 



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Jay Tighe then rose to make motion to reconsider the vote. Moderator asked 
did you vote on the prevailing side? Mr. Tighe did, vote on prevailing side, 
then Robert Peterson, "I move for reconsideration of this article." as I did 
not vote on prevailing side. Barbara Sullivan, Conservation Commission urged 
people to reconsider their vote. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 101 No 
194. Motion for reconsideration fails. 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn #15) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw and the associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by creating a 
new Central Business District and by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend (Section 3) Table 1 Principal Use Regulations by adding the 
following column under the term Business Districts: 

PRINCIPAL USES BUSINESS DISTRICTS 

CB 

3.2 EXTENSIVE USES 



3.2.1 Agriculture No 

3.2.2 Greenhouse No 

3.2.3 Conservation No 

3.2.4 Recreation No 

3.2.5 Earth Removal No 



3.3 RESIDENTIAL USES 



3.3.1 Single Family Dwelling No 

3.3.2 Accessory Apartment No 

3.3.3 Community Housing Facility SP 

3.3.4 Municipal Building Reuse SP 

3.4 GOVERNMENTAL, INSTITUTIONAL AND 
PUBLIC SERVICE USES 



3.4.1 Municipal Use Yes 

3.4.2 Educational Yes 

3.4.3 Religious Yes 

3.4.4 Philanthropic Yes 

3.4.5 Nursery School Yes 

3.4.6 Hospital and Nursing Home SP 

3.4.7 Public Service Utility Yes 



3.5 BUSINESS USES 



3.5 


. 1 


Retail Store 


Yes 


3.5 


.2 


Business and Professional Office 


Yes 


3.5 


.3 


Bank 


Yes 


3.5 


.4 


Limited Service Restaurant 


Yes 


3.5 


.5 


General Service Restaurant 


SP 


3.5 


.6 


Hotel or Motel 


SP 


3.5 


.7 


Lodge and Club 


Yes 


3.5 


.8 


Funeral Home 


No 


3.5 


.9 


Veterinary Care 


SP 


3.5 


.10 


Personal Service Shop 


Yes 


3.5 


.11 


Craft Shop and Building Trade 


Yes 


3.5 


.12 


Commercial and Trade School 


SP 


3.5 


.13 


Amusement Facility 


SP 


3.5 


.14 


Auto Service Station and Car Wash 


No 


3.5 


.15 


Auto Repair and Body Shop 


No 


3.5 


.16 


Vehicular Dealership 


No 


3.5 


.17 


Parking Facility 


Yes 



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3.6 INDUSTRIAL USES 



3.6.1 Warehouse 

3.6.2 Bulk Material Storage and Sales 

3.6.3 Heavy Vehicular Dealership and 

Repair Garage 

3.6.4 Light Manufacturing 

3.6.5 Limited Manufacturing 

3.6.6 General Manufacturing 

3.7 PROHIBITED USES 



No 
No 

No 
No 
No 
No 



3.7.1 



Prohibited Uses 



No 



Remaining columns to remain unchanged. 

(2) Amend (Section 5) Table II Standard Dimensional Regulations by inserting 
after the term General Business the term Central Business and assign the 
following dimensional criteria. 



Minimum lot area in 

square feet 
Minimum lot frontage 

in feet 
Minimum lot width in feet 
Minimum front yard in feet 
Minimum side and rear 

yard in feet 



Minimum open space 



Maximum bldg. coverage 

in percent 
Maximum height in feet 
Maximum height in stories 



10,000 

40 
40 
5 



20 feet where such a use 
abuts a residential 
district, 20 feet rear yard 
in all cases; feet for 
the side yard where such a 
use abuts a commercial use. 
None. However, where such 
a use abuts a residential 
district or a residential 
use a landscaper buffer 
consistent with section 
5.2.6.1 shall be provided 



50% 
40 
3 



(3) 



Amend Section 2 Establishment of Districts by inserting the term Central 
Business under the term Business Districts , 



(4) Amend Section 6.3.5.3 by adding the phrase Central Business District 
before the term Neighborhood Business District . 

(5) Amend Section 3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant by deleting the phrase 
"Establishment, with an indoor seating capacity of at least 50 people" 
and substituting the phrase "Food service establishment as defined by 
the State Sanitary Code." 

(6) Amend Section 3.5.5 General Service Restaurant by deleting the word 
"Establishment" and substituting the phrase "Food service establishment 
as defined by the State Sanitary Code." 



(7) 



Add a new subsection 5.2.6.1 as follows; 



5.2.6.1 Residential landscape buffer. When a commercial use in the 
Central Business District abuts a residential district or use, the 
commercial use shall be set back from the residential use or district 
consistent with the requirements of this by-law. Further, the first twenty 
feet of any setback, measured from the commercial lot line or commercial 
zoning line shall be landscaped in the following manner. On the parcel 
boundary line the commercial use shall be required to erect a five foot solid 



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panel wooden fence. Further, not closer than ten feet from the parcel 
boundary line, the commercial use shall plant one tree for every twenty feet 
(20') of common boundary length. The exact spacing to be determined by the 
Building Inspector to ensure maximum screening. At the time of planting each 
tree shall have a trunk width (diameter) of at least three inches measured at 
a point six inches above grade after planting. 

(8) Add a new Section 6.4.1.4 as follows: 

Section 6.4.1.4 Parking Requirements for Central Business District. In 
the Central Business District off-street parking shall be consistent with the 
requirements of this by-law except that retail and service business shall be 
required to provide one off-street space per 400 sq. ft. of gross floor area 
and office space at the rate of one space per 500 sq. ft. of gross floor area. 
Further, in the instance where the property line boundary of a retail store, 
business or professional office, bank, personal service or craft shop and 
building trade shop is within 600 feet of a public parking lot of at least 60 
spaces and that at least two-thirds of the parking spaces are designated for 
use of less than two hours, the off-street parking requirement for the uses 
noted above shall be 1 space per 600 sq. ft. of gross floor area for all uses 
noted above except that off-street parking for business or professional office 
use shall be required at a rate of one space per 750 sq. ft. of gross floor 
area. 

(9) Delete Section 6.4.1.2 in its entirety and replace it with the 
following: 

6.4.1.2 Shared Parking. Notwithstanding any other parking requirements 
set forth in this bylaw for individual land uses, when any land or building is 
used for two or more distinguishable purposes (i.e., joint or mixed use 
development), the minimum total number of parking spaces required to serve the 
combination of all uses shall be determined in the following manner: Multiply 
the minimum parking requirement for each individual use (as set forth by the 
schedule of uses. Section 6.4.1.1 of this by-law) by the appropriate 
percentage (as set forth below) for each of the five designated time periods 
and then add the resulting sums from each vertical column. The column total 
having the highest total value is the minimum shared parking space requirement 
for that combination of land uses. 



PARKING CREDIT SCHEDULE CHART 



USES 




WEEKDAY 




WEEKEND 




Night 


Day 


Evening 


Day 


Evening 




Midnight 


- 7 a.m.- 


5 p.m.- 


6 a.m.- 


6 p.m.- 




7 a.m. 


5 p.m. 


Midnight 


6 p.m. 


Midnight 


Dwelling 


100% 


50% 


90% 


80% 


80% 


Business and 












Professional Office 












and Industrial 


5% 


100% 


10% 


10% 


5% 


Retail and Service 












Business 


5% 


50% 


90% 


100% 


5% 


Hotel/Motel or 












Lodging House 


70% 


70% 


100% 


70% 


100% 


Restaurant 


5% 


50% 


100% 


50% 


100% 


Day Care Facilities 


5% 


100% 


5% 


20% 


5% 


Education 


5% 


100% 


20% 


20% 


5% 


Hospital and Nursing 












Home 


100% 


100% 


100% 


100% 


100% 


Auto Service Station 


5% 


100% 


70% 


100% 


70% 


All Other 


100% 


100% 


100% 


100% 


100% 



(10) Add a new line item "3.3.5 multi-family housing" to Section 3.5 Table 1 
Principal Use Regulations; insert the term NO under all zoning 
districts, except that under CB (Central Business) insert the term SP. 



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(11) Add a new subsection 3.8.10 to read as follows: 



3.8.10 Multi-family use in the Central Business District shall be 
allowed by special permit from the Planning Board subject to the following 
minimum special permit criteria. 

(a) In existing structures multi-family uses shall be restricted to 
floors above the ground floor; access to the residential unit shall be 
secure, separate and clearly distinguishable from any access to any 
commercial activity; parking shall be provided on-site at a rate of 1 
space per unit; residential units shall not be located on any floor 
containing any commercial use, i.e., all floors used for residential 
purposes shall be exclusively residential; all commercial signs on any 
building where residential uses are located above a commercial use shall 
not be illuminated between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. 

(b) For new construction, new buildings that are designed for 
residential and commercial use shall be subject to the dimensional 
requirements set forth for the CB district; the minimum special permit 
criteria as contained herein; and any other criteria approved by the 
Board of Appeals. 

(c) For new residential construction in the CB district that is designed 
entirely for multi-family residential use the following criteria shall 
apply: 



Minimum lot area 



25,000 sq. ft. 



Density 



One unit per 4000 sq. ft. of 
lot area; and not more than 
12 units per structure 



Height 



Forty feet but not to 
exceed three stories 



Open space 
Parking 

Maximum building coverage 

Minimum front yard 

Minimum side and rear yards 



40% of total lot area 
1.5 spaces per dwelling 
30% 

30 feet 

50 feet, and subject to the 
landscaping requirements of 
Section 5.2.6.1 



(12) 



Add a new zoning subsection, 3.8 Minimum Special Permit Criteria, as 
follows; and create a citation in the Table of Contents: 



3.8 Minimum Special Permit Criteria. Notwithstanding any other 
special permit criteria that may be required by the special permit granting 
authority, the following minimum criteria shall apply to the following special 
permits. 



3.8.1 Hotels or Motels shall be subject to the following minimum 
special permit criteria. 



minimum lot size of 60,000 square feet, 
minimum lot frontage of 200 linear feet. 

The twenty foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 
shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 



-135- 



of access or egress from the site. Further, the required 
twenty foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the rec[uired twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instances, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

3.8.2 Commercial and trade schools located in the Central Business 
District shall be subject to the following minimum special permit criteria. 

o No automotive related training schools except drivers education 

shall be permitted. 

o All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 

signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

3.8.3 Amusement facilities in the Central Business District shall be 
subject to the following minimum special permit criteria. 

o All facilities shall be housed within a structure, and may not 

exceed 1,000 sq. ft. total area. 

3.8.4 All general service restaurants shall be subject to the following 
minimum special permit criteria. 



Minimum lot size shall be 40,000 square feet. 

At least one off-street loading zone shall be provided. 

All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 
signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

All lighting for parking or building illumination shall be 
directed onto the lot at all times; a lighting plan to this 
effect shall be prepared for review by the special permit 
granting authority. 

The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 
shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the recfuired 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 



-136- 



for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instances, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

o Drive-through facilities shall be permitted if the submitted 

site plan can accommodate an on-site waiting line of at least 8 
vehicles . 

13. Rezone from General Business (GB) to Central Business (CBD) the 

following parcels of land located on Main Street, Middlesex Avenue, 
Church Street and Kirk Street and shown as Assessor's Map 42, Parcels 1, 
2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 12A, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 
22A, 22C, 22D, 22F, 22G, 23, 30, 31, 32, 33B and the portions of Parcels 
6, 7, 22, 33A, 34 and 35 that are located in the existing GB zone; and 
Assessor's Map 41, Parcels 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 65, 64, 
63, 62, 56 and portions of Parcels llOA, 114, 116, 70A, 66 and 61 that 
are located in the existing GB zone; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester Bruce, reads the same as the above article. 

Discussion on Articles 19, 20 & 21 will be taken up together then the vote 
taken separately. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Lynn Duncan, Planning and Conservation Director stated the basic concept of 
this change is to grant business and property owners greater flexibility, 
while granting greater control by the Town. Based on a study by the Town 
Center Committee, this new zoning is part of the plan to guide rezoning in the 
Route 38 corridor which now contains a high number of non-conforming uses. 
Five public hearings were held and notices explaining the articles were sent 
to 200 property owners. The current zoning limits development. This central 
business district encourages change with which will help the economic 
development of the Town and creates a more traditional center. The purpose of 
Article 20 is to reorganize the uses in General Business Zone by Special 
Permit to replace High Density Business District and all parcels in High 
Density will be rezoned to General Business. Article 21 addresses the high 
number of nonconforming parcels in the area. Rezone from General Industrial 
to General Business to more properly reflect the business now there and to 
encourage further development. Selectman Michael McCoy urged voters not to 
support. Other members of the Board, Chester Bruce, Diane Allen, Gerald 
Duggan and Robert Cain support article. Much discussion followed concerning 
the articles. Vote was taken on each article separately. Articles require 
2/3rds vote. Vote is as follows: 

Article 19 Yes 119. No. 15. 
Article 20 Yes 124 No. 15 
Article 21 Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn #15) To see if the Town will vote to cunend the Zoning By- 
law and the associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington relative to 
commercial zoning districts and uses by taking the following actions: 

(1) Amend (Section 3) Table 1 Principal Use Regulations by substituting SP 
(Special Permit) as follows: 

3.5 Business use OB 

3.5.4 Limited service restaurant SP 

3.5.5 General service restaurant SP 

3.5.6 Hotel or motel SP 

3.5.14 Auto service station and car wash SP 

3.5.15 Auto repair and body shop SP 

3.5.16 Vehicular dealership SP 

Remaining columns to remain unchanged. 



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(2) Amend Section 2 Establishment of Districts by deleting the phrase High 
Density Business under the term Business District . 

(3) Amend (Section 3) Table 1 Principal Use Regulations by deleting the 
column HDB. 

(4) Amend (Section 5) Table II Standard Dimensional Regulations by deleting 
the phrase High Density Business and the dimensional requirements 
related to high density business. 

(5) Amend Section 3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant by deleting the phrase 
"Establishment, with an indoor seating capacity of at least 50 people" 
and substituting the phrase "Food service establishment as defined by 
the State Sanitary Code." 

(6) Amend Section 3.5.5 General Service Restaurant by deleting the word 
"Establishment" and substituting the phrase "Food service establishment 
as defined by the State Sanitary Code." 

(7) Add a new subsection 5.2.6.1 as follows: 

5.2.6.1 Residential landscape buffer. When a commercial use in the 
General Business District abuts a residential district or use, the 
commercial use shall be set back from the residential use or district 
consistent with the requirements of this by-law. Further, the first 
twenty feet of any setback, measured from the commercial lot line or 
commercial zoning line shall be landscaped in the following manner. On 
the parcel boundary line the commercial use shall be required to erect a 
five-foot solid panel wooden fence. Further, not closer than ten feet 
from the parcel boundary line, the commercial use shall plant one tree 
for every twenty feet (20') of common boundary length. The exact 
spacing to be determined by the Building Inspector to ensure maximum 
screening. At the time of planting, each tree shall have a trunk width 
(diameter) of at least three inches measured at a point six inches above 
grade after planting. 

(8) Amend the minimum open space rec[uirement for General Business in Table 2 
Standard Dimensional Regulations from 30% to 20% of lot area. 
Specifically, the minimum open space requirement should be amended to 
read "20% in all cases and where business or industrial use abuts a 
residential district, or a residential use, a landscaped buffer 
consistent with Section 5.2.6.1 shall be provided." 

(9) Amend the minimum front yard in General Business from thirty feet to 
twenty feet and add a new subsection, 5.2.4.1 as follows: 

5.2.4.1 Front yards in the General Business District shall be planted 
with natural materials; at a minimum, trees. Each tree (at planting) 
shall have a minimum trunk width (diameter) of three inches measured 
at a point six inches above grade. One tree shall be required for each 
25 feet of lot frontage; the location and spacing of the trees shall be 
at the discretion of the owner but subject to final approval by the Town 
Engineer. 

(10) Amend Section 6.4.1.1 by deleting it in its entirety and replacing it 
with the text that follows: 



a) Dwelling: 

b) Hotel or Motel or Lodging 

Houses : 

c) Education Use: 



d) Hospital and Nursing 
Home: 



2 spaces for each dwelling unit. 



1.25 spaces per bedroom. 
1 space for each staff position, 
plus 1 space for each five persons 
of rated capacity of the largest 
auditorium, and 1 space for each 
student vehicle which can be 
expected at only one time on the 
premises . 

1 space per bed. 



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e) Retail and Service 
Business: 



1 



space per 250 sq. ft. of gross floor area. 



f) Business and Professional 
Office: 



1 
1 



space per 300 sq. ft. of gross floor area, 
space per 800 sq. ft. of gross floor area. 



g) Industrial Use 



h) Permanent Storage 
Facility: 



1 



space per 1,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area. 



i) Restaurant, Place of 

Worship other place of 
assembly: 



1 
3 



space/3 seats or 36" of counter, 
spaces per service bay. 



j) Auto Service Station: 



(11) Amend Section 6.4.2 Parking Dimensional Regulations by eunending the 
required width of a parking stall from 10 feet to 9 feet, keeping the 
parallel parking width at eight feet, and amending the required depth of 
a parking stall from 20 feet to 18 feet, expect parallel parking which 
will remain at 22 feet. 

(12) Amend Section 6.4.2.1 Small Car Stalls by amending the depth from 18 
feet to 16 feet and the width from 8.5 feet to 7.5 feet. 

Add a new section to the by-law, and create a citation in the Table of Uses 
indicating its presence. 

(13) Add a new zoning subsection, 3.8 Minimum Special Permit Criteria, as 
follows; and create a citation in the Table of Contents: 

3.8 Minimum Special Permit Criteria. Notwithstanding any other 
special permit criteria that may be required by the special permit granting 
authority, the following minimum criteria shall apply to the following special 
permits . 

3.8.1 Hotels or Motels shall be subject to the following minimum 
special permit criteria. 

o Minimum lot size of 60,000 square feet. 

o Minimum lot frontage of 200 linear feet. 

o The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law. 



shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the required 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instances, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 



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3.8.4 All general service restaurants shall be subject to the following 
minimum special permit criteria. 

o Minimum lot size shall be 40,000 square feet. 



At least one off-street loading zone shall be provided. 

All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 
signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

All lighting for parking or building illumination shall be 
directed onto the lot at all times; a lighting plan to this 
effect shall be prepared for review by the special permit 
granting authority. 

The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 
shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the recjuired twenty 
foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the recjuired twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instance, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

Drive-through facilities shall be permitted if the 

submitted site plan can accommodate an on-site waiting line of 

at least 8 vehicles. 



3.8.5 All limited service restaurants in the General Business district 
shall be subject to the following minimum special permit criteria, 

o All signs shall be affixed to the primary structure, i.e., wall 

signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 



o All lighting for parking or building illumination shall be 

directed onto the lot at all times; a lighting plan to this 
effect shall be prepared for the special permit granting 
authority. 

o The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 

shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the required 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 



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The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instance, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

o Drive-through facilities shall be permitted if the submitted 

site plan can accommodate an on-site waiting line of at least 8 
vehicles . 

3.8.6 Car washes in the General Business District shall be subject to 
the following minimum special permit criteria. 

O Minimum lot size of 60,000 sq. ft. 

o At the boundary of the parcel the noise level emanating from the 

car wash operations shall not exceed 55 decibels. 

o The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 

shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the required 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instance, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

o All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 

signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

o The site plan shall indicate that at least twelve vehicles can 

be queued waiting for service on the lot. 

3.8.7 An auto repair and body shop in the General Business District 
shall be subject to the following minimum special permit criteria. 

o All vehicles shall be repaired inside a structure, and no more 

than three repaired or to be repaired vehicles at any one time 



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shall be stored outside the structures associated with the auto 
repair and body shop use. 

o All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 

signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

o The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 

shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the recjuired 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 
including trees. In all instance, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

3.8.8 A vehicular dealership in the General Business District shall be 
subject to the following minimum special permit criteria. 



o Minimum lot size 100,000 sq. ft. 

o All signs shall be affixed to the primary building, i.e., wall 

signs; no other signs shall be permitted. 

o The twenty-foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law. 



shall be landscaped with plant materials and shall be required 
to have one tree for every twenty-five feet of frontage. At the 
time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of at least 
three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer 
but shall not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points 
of access or egress from the site. Further, the required 
twenty-foot front yard setback shall contain an arrangement of 
plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within two years 
of planting shall attain a height of at least thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet 
from the street line but not necessarily in a straight row. 
Further, they shall be placed and maintained so as not to impede 
safe access to or egress from the site. At the discretion of 
the developer, the plan for landscaping in the required twenty- 
foot front yard setback may include fencing, earth berms, and 
walls. These materials and landscaping devices may substitute 
for all or some of the arrangement of plantings noted above; not 



-142- 



including trees. In all instance, however, the height of any 
fences, berms and walls shall not exceed a height of thirty-six 
inches above finished grade, and shall be designed and located 
as not to impede safe access to or egress from the site, and 
shall be at least ten feet from the street line, but not 
necessarily in a straight row. All other surface areas of the 
landscaped portion of the front yard setback shall be planted 
with a ground cover, grass, or mulching, where appropriate. 

3.8.9 Retail uses in the GI district shall be subject to the following 
minimum special permit criteria. 

o The maximum gross floor area used for retail or personal service 

uses shall not exceed 2,000 sq. ft. on any one lot. 

o In any one contiguous district zoned GI the total maximum gross 

floor area used for retail or personal service uses shall not 
exceed 8,000 sq. ft. as a total for all lots in the district. 

(14) Amend the "note" in Table 1 Principal Use Regulations, by adding the 
following sentence. 

o Further, special permits allowed by this by-law may be subject 

to minimum special permit criteria, see Section 3.8. 

(15) Amend Section 4 Accessory Use Regulations, by amending subsection 4.1.12 
by adding the following sentence. 

o The total amount of area used for retail sales of products 

manufactured on the premises shall not exceed 50% of any one 
building and not more than 5,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area. 

(16) Amend Section 6.5 Site Plan Review by adding the following subsection: 

6.5.5 An applicant for a building permit subject to site plan review 
may appeal any and all conditions of the site plan review to the Board of 
Appeals consistent with the filing and notification procedures of the Board of 
Appeals. 



o Amend Section 6.5.2.2 by adding the term "Town Planner," after 

the term "Planning Board." 

o Amend Section 6.5.2.3 by adding the term "Town Planner," before 

the term "Planning Board." 

o Amend Section 6.5.3 by adding the term "Town Planner, " before 

the term "Planning Board" in the first sentence. Further, add 
the term Town Planner, before the term Planning Board in the 
second sentence. 

(17) Rezoning from High Density Business (HDB) to General Business (GB) the 
following parcels of land located on Main Street and Lowell Street and 
shown as Assessor's Map 40, Parcel 3; Map 49, Parcel 57D; Map 41, Parcel 
138; Map 39, Parcel 11; Map 44, Parcel 178C; and Map 72, Parcels lA and 
IB; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allen, reads the Seune as above article. For 
discussion see Article 19. Planning Board and Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. Vote on this 
article. Yes 124 No 15. So voted. 



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ARTICLE 21. (drawn #15) To see if the Town will vote to eunend the Zoning By- 
law and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from General Industrial (GI) to General Business (GB) the following parcels of 
land on Main Street and shown as Assessor's Map 42, Parcels 29, 27, 26, 24, 
22E, 22H, 22J, 22K and the portions of Parcels 25A, 25 and 22 that are located 
in the existing GI zone; and Assessor's Map 40, Parcels 2A, 28 and 2C; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Gerald R. Duggan, reads the same as the above article and also 
adding Parcel 28 and 42B (off Clark Street) to this article. Motion 
accepted as main motion. This was a small clerical error and these two 
small parcels should be included in this rezoning. For discussion see 
Article 19. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. Vote on this article was unanimous. 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of the care, 
custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by the Town 
of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation Commission. Said 
parcels are described as Map 88, Parcel 15 and Map 101, Parcel 11; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr. "I move that the Town vote to 
authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Conservation Commission. Said parcels are described as 
Map 88, Parcel 15." Motion is same as above with Map 101, Parcel 11 has 
been deleted. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn #33) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, and for the express purpose of conveying the same in order to 
provide affordable housing, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 
30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and 
convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen. Said 
parcels and interest are described as follows: 

Map 19, Parcels 18A, 18B, 18C 
Map 11, Parcels 47, 53, 54, 9 
Map 55, Parcels 85, 86, 87 
Map 67, Parcel 72; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington and for the express purpose of 
conveying the same in order to provide affordable housing, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest 
in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms 
and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen. Said parcels 
and interest are described as follows: 

Map 19, Parcels 18A, 18B, 18C 
Map 11, Parcels 47, 53, 54, 9 
Map 67, Parcel 72; 



-144- 



Article reads the same as in booklet with the exception of the removal of Map 
55, Parcels 85, 86, 87. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Town Moderator determined to be suitable for the purpose of 
Affordable Housing. Carol Hcunilton, member of Affordable Housing Task 
explained this is the first step in a long process to develop Affordable 
Housing. They would expect to build on these lots, however there will be 
public hearings and input from neighborhood before final building is done. 
She urged Town Meeting support. Much discussion from neighbors who were 
against this type of housing in this developed neighborhood and question the 
impact on the neighborhood. Chester Bruce, Board of Selectmen spoke in favor 
of this type of home to benefit many people from the community. Reverend 
Stotts, "I hope we are a community that cares." I urge your support. 
Community should not keep people out. Motion to move question and end debate. 
Vote is Yes 97 No 36. Motion approved with 2/3rd vote. Vote then taken on 
main motion. Article 23 as presented. Vote is Yes 87 No 37. 

ARTICLE 24. (drawn #24) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 7, Parcel 31; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn #30) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 11, Parcel 26; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to 
be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express 
purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws 
Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized 
to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of 
Wilmington for a price of not less than $ 10.000 and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with 
Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 11, 
Parcel 26." 

Town Manager declared this land is surplus. Assessors fair market price is 
$10,000. Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 26. (drawn #5) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the Seune, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 55, Parcel 170A; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that vote to authorize transfer of the 
care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of 
conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 308; 
and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and 
convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington 
for a price of not less than $ 2 . 500 and upon such terms and conditions 
as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 55, Parcel 
170A." Town Manager declared this is surplus property. Planning Board 
and Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 



ARTICLE 27. (drawn #17) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the Seune, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 70, Parcel 23; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Gerald Duggan, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to 
be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express 
purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws 
Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized 
to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of 
Wilmington for a price of not less than $5,000 and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with 
Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 70, 
Parcel 23. Motion seconded. Land is surplus to needs of Town. 
Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 28. (drawn #34) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 6, Parcel 123; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that we pass over this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn #7) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 303; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised including, but 
not limited to, a restriction that no dwelling shall be constructed on said 
premises as a condition of this transfer. Said parcels and interest are 
described as Map 10, Parcels 20A and 21; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to 
be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express 
purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws 
Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized 
to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of 
Wilmington for a price not less than $ 14. 000 and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with 
Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised including, but not limited to, a restriction that no 
dwelling shall be constructed on said premises as a condition of this 
transfer. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 10, Parcels 
20A and 21." Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn #9) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to appoint a committee, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, for the purpose of studying the problem of unaccepted ways and to 
determine the cost of improving the same in accordance with Planning Board 
standards and further to determine if the Town should undertake a program of 
construction for the purpose of accepting same as public ways; said committee 
to report its findings and recommendations to the Town within three years; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Manager to appoint a committee, subject to the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, consisting of not less than seven (7) and no more 
than fifteen (15) individuals for the purpose of studying the problem of 
unaccepted ways and to determine the cost of improving the same in 
accordance with Planning Board standards and further to determine if the 



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Town should undertake a program of construction for the purpose of 
accepting same as public ways; said committee to report its findings and 
recommendations to the Town within three years." Motion seconded. 
Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion voted, 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn #44) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for the purpose of 
providing for the transmission of intelligence and electricity such easement 
locations being more particularly described below, in, on and over several 
private ways or paper streets and being contiguous to Town-owned land and to 
set an administrative fee therefore; location on Buckingham Street (formerly 
known as Washington Avenue/Road and/or Commonwealth Avenue), Dalton Avenue 
(formerly known as Chelsea Avenue), and Revere Avenue and contiguous to Town- 
owned land described on Assessor's Map 10, Plots 21 and 20A and Map 9, Plot 
66; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for 
the purpose of providing for the transmission of intelligence and 
electricity such easement locations being more particularly described 
below in, on and over several private ways or paper streets and being 
contiguous to Town-owned land and to set an administrative fee 
therefore; location on Buckingham Street (formerly known as Washington 
Avenue/Road and/or Commonwealth Avenue), Dalton Avenue (formerly known 
as Chelsea Avenue), and Revere Avenue and contiguous to Town-owned land 
described on Assessor's Map 10, Plots 21 and 20A and Map 9, Plot 66. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion so voted Yes 152 No 3. 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn #19) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to act as follows: 

a. To grant slope easements to Thomas Realty Trust on three parcels 
of Town-owned land shown on Assessor's Map 10, Parcels 20A, 21 
and 22; 

b. To accept easements from Thomas Realty Trust for the benefit of 
the Town on property abutting Map 10, Parcels 20A, 21 and 22; 

c. To accept 5' easements from Thomas Realty Trust for snow removal 
along roadway areas; and 

to grant and accept such other easements as necessary, including fill and 
excavation easements in roadway areas, easements for utilities and snow 
removal, to allow the construction of Buckinghaun Estates as shown on the 
approved site development plan approved by the Board of Appeals; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., "I move to pass over this article. 
Motion seconded and so voted to pass over." 



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ARTICLE 33. (drawn #39) To see if the Town will vote to change the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from 
Residential 60 (R60) to Residential 20 (R20) the following described parcel of 
land: 

That certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated on the 
easterly side of Chestnut Street in Wilmington, in the County of Middlesex, 
and thus bounded and described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point on said Chestnut Street at the northwesterly 

corner of the premises, thence EASTERLY along land now or formerly 
of George B. Richardson four hundred and eighteen (418) feet to a 
stake; 

THENCE turning and running in a SOUTHERLY direction along a stone 

wall by land of A. H. Hall, three hundred ten and 17/100 (310.17) 

feet to a corner in said wall; 
THENCE turning and running in a WESTERLY direction along a stone 

wall by land of said Hall two hundred and forty-two and 22/100 

(242.22) feet to a corner in said stone wall; 
THENCE turning and running in a NORTHERLY direction forty and 

30/100 (40.30) feet along said stone wall; 
THENCE turning and running along said wall in a WESTERLY direction one 

hundred sixty-eight and 16/100 (168.16) feet to said Chestnut 

Street; 

THENCE turning and running along said Chestnut Street two hundred and 
nine and 04/100 (209.04) feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing two and 298/1000 (2.298) acres, more or less. For petitioner's 
title see deed recorded at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 
2283, Page 134. 

The above referenced parcel is also shown as Parcel 1 on Town of Wilmington 
Assessor's Map 1; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Terry Patterson, same as main motion above. Motion seconded. 
Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Mrs. 
Patterson stated she wished to create one hammerhead lot on our 2 1/2 
acre (sp) of dry land of 40,000 scpaare feet zoning to build a house for 
one of our children. This would not be out of conformity with the rest 
of the neighborhood. Mr. Longo, Planning Board spot zoning is not the 
best thing to do here. Petitioner does have other options to build on 
this lot. Betty Bigwood, Chestnut Street was opposed also to this 
rezoning. Presently undergoing a lot of development in this area. 
Motion rec[uires 2/3rds vote. Yes 28 No 67. Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn #28) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 20 (R20) to Residential 60 (R60) the following parcels of 
land located in South Wilmington as listed on the Assessor's legal file of Map 
3 the following parcels: 2A, 2B, 2C, 3, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7A, 8, 96A, 96, 95, 
94A, 93A, 92A, 91A, 109A, 116, 117, 118 and 119; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn #35) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 20 (R20) to Residential 60 (R60) the following parcels of 
land located in southern Wilmington as listed on the Assessor's legal file of 
Map 4 the following parcels: 1, 2, 2A, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



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Motion by Christine Ondreicka, petitioner, "I move to withdraw this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn #42) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 20 (R20) to Residential 60 (R60) the following parcels of 
land located in southern Wilmington as listed on the Assessor's legal file of 
Map 5 the following parcels: 1, lA, IB, IC, ID, IE, IF, IG, IH, IJ, IK, 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Christine Ondreicka, petitioner, "I make a motion to withdraw 
this article." Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw. 

ARTICLE 37. (drawn #40) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Law and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 20 (R20) to Residential 60 {R60) the following parcels of 
land located in southern Wilmington as listed in the Assessor's legal file of 
Map 15 the following parcels: 1, lA, 2, 2A, 2B, 2C, 3, 3A, 3B, 4, 4A, 6, 7B, 
7C, 8, 9A, 9B, 10, lOA, 108, IOC, lOD, llA, 12, 13, 13B, 13A, 14, 14A, 15, 
158, 16, 16A, 17, 178, 17A, 17C, 15A, 18, 19, 20, 21, 21A, 22, 23, 24, 24A, 
248, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29A, 298, 29C, 29D, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 
108, 109, 110 and 111; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Christine Ondreicka, petitioner, "I move to withdraw this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw. 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn #37) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 20 (R20) to Residential 60 (R60) the following parcels of 
land located in southern Wilmington as listed on the Assessor's legal file of 
Map 16 the following parcels: 1, lA, 18, 2, 2A, 28, 2C, 281, 3, 4, 4A, 48, 
4C, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 15A, 158, 15C, 16, 16A, 168, 16C, 
16C, 17, 17A, 18, 19, 19A, 20, 21, 22A, 22B, 23, 24, 24A, 25, 26A, 27, 28, 29, 
30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 35A, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 50, 51, 51A, 52, 52A, 53, 54, 55, 56, 56A, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 
63A, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 70A, 71, 72 and 73; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Christine Ondreicka, petitioner, "I move to withdraw this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn #29) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington (Revised January 
1993) by rezoning a parcel of land located at 208 Main Street, a portion of 
which from the presently zoned General Business (GB) and a portion of which is 
presently zoned Residential 20 (R20) to the entire parcel being rezoned to 
General Business (GB) the following described parcel of land: 

That certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of Middlesex 
and said Commonwealth, bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHWESTERLY by Main Street, one hundred ninety (190) feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY two hundred fifty (250) feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY one hundred sixty (160) feet, by Lot 17; and 

SOUTHEASTERLY again by Lot 14, two hundred fifty-one and 65/100 (251.65) 

feet. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown 
on subdivision Plan 14154-0, drawn by Spartan Survey Service, Surveyors, dated 
June 15, 1982, as approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration 
Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 24907, 



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and said land is shown as lot thirteen (13) on said plan. Said parcel is also 
shown as Parcel 178B on the Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 44. 

For Petitioner's Title, see Certificate of Title Number 26124 recorded at 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land Registration Office at Book 
133, Page 247; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Ray McNamara, "I move to amend the Zoning By-Laws and 
associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington (Revised January 1993) 
by rezoning a parcel of land located at 208 Main Street, a portion of 
which from the presently zoned General Business (GB) and a portion of 
which is presently zoned Residential 20 (R20) to the entire parcel being 
rezoned to General Business (GB) the following described parcel of land: 
the description reads the same as above. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Planning Board recommends approval, unanimous of this 
Article. The rezoning will make the zoning of the parcel consistent. 
It is a housekeeping type of rezoning as it was most likely left out 
inadvertently when the adjacent parcel was rezoned to GB. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 40. (drawn 1st as #8 considered after Art. 19, 20 & 21 as #16) To 
see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and associated zoning 
map of the Town of Wilmington (Revised January 1993) by rezoning a parcel of 
land located at 212 Main Street, from its present zoning (Front Portion) High 
Density Business (HDB) and (Rear Portion) Residential 20 (R20) to the entire 
parcel being rezoned to High Density Business (HDB) the following described 
parcel of land: 

That certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of Middlesex 
and said Commonwealth, bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Main Street by a curved line one hundred (100) feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY by Lot 14, two hundred forty-seven and 95/100 (247.95) 
feet ; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot 17, one hundred ten (110) feet; and 
SOUTHERLY by Lot 16, two hundred thirty-six and 69/100 (236.69) 
feet. 

All of said boundaries are determined by Land Court to be located as shown on 
subdivision plan 14154-0, drawn by Spartan Survey Service, Surveyors, dated 
June 15, 1982, as approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration 
Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 24907, 
and said land is shown as lot fifteen (15) on said plan. Said parcel is also 
shown as Parcel 178C on the Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 44. 

For Petitioner's Title, see Certificate of Title Number 24907 recorded at 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Land Registration Office at Book 
127, Page 213; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Town Moderator asked petitioner Raymond McNeimara, to postpone action on this 
article until after Articles 19, 20, & 21 to be presented by the Planning 
Board since they are a direct effect on this article. He agreed. Motion by 
Raymond McNamara, I move to postpone consideration of Article 40 until after 
consideration of Articles 19, 20, & 21. Motion seconded and so voted to 
postpone. Article 40 taken up after completion of Articles 19, 20 & 21. 

Motion by Raymond McNamara, reads the same as the above motion but now 
because of zoning changes in previous article, zoning change should read 
rezone from its present zoning (Front Portion) High Density Business 
(HDB) and (Rear Portion) Residential 20 (R20) to the entire parcel being 
rezoned to General Business. Mr. McNamara stated that this was 
developed years ago and just small piece was left residential. 



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Planning Board and Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 41. (drawn #24) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone 
from Residential 60 (R60) to Residential 20 (R20) that land described as land 
shown on Assessor's Map R-1, Parcel 6C, further described as follows: 

EASTERLY by Andover Street two hundred fifty (250) feet more or less; 
NORTHERLY by land of Jeffrey Miller two hundred twenty-seven (227) feet, 

more or less and one hundred ninety (190) feet, more or less; 
WESTERLY by land of Jeffrey Miller one hundred (100) feet, more or less; 

and 

SOUTHERLY by land of Bigelow, R.T., Donald MacDonald, Tr. four hundred 

fifty (450) feet, more or less; 
and containing area of 2.2 acres, more or less; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Kenneth Miller, Petitioner to withdraw this article. Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 42. (drawn #31) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Laws 5.3.4 Heunmerhead Lots to delete "no more than two hammerhead lots shall 
have continuous frontage" and change it to say "no more than one hammerhead 
lot shall have continuous frontage;" or do anything in relation thereto. 

Moderator stated he had received prior notice from the petitioner that 
this article was to be withdrawn. When he asked for a motion, Christine 
Ondreic)ca stated she had changed her mind and wished to present this 
article. Moderator ruled her motion out of order, since previous public 
notice to withdraw had been given by your letter sent to the Town Cleric 
and Town Manager. Christine Ondreicka then agreed to motion to 
withdraw. Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn #4) To see if the Town will vote to remove from the 
Official Map the private graveled way called Marion Street Extension from 
Chestnut Street through the 685 feet of property belonging to Velma Emery, Tr. 
of 165 Chestnut Street, Map 15, Parcel 13; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Christine L. Ondreicka, 1 Marion St. Ext., "I move to see if 
the Town will vote to remove from the Official Map the private graveled 
way called Marion Street Extension from Chestnut Street through the 685 
feet of property belonging to Velma Emery, Tr. of 165 Chestnut Street, 
Map 15, Parcel 13; or do anything in relation thereto." Motion 
seconded. Planning Board and Finance Committee wish to pass over until 
they hear from Town Counsel. Alan Altman, Town Counsel stated he 
recommends disapproval of this article. Planning Board and Finance 
Committee then recommended disapproval. Mrs. Ondreicka deferred her 
time to her mother, Velma M. Emery owner of property at 165 Chestnut 
Street. She stated this property contains the oldest house in 
Wilmington (1682) and their concerns are a subdivision proposal to be 
built in this area. They wish to remove 685 feet from the official map 
to protect their property, and preserve the area. Emery Farm raises 
nationally known horses. Town Counsel stated this is neighborhood 
dispute and should be settled between abutters or by a Judge in a court 
of law. This is not a dispute of the Town of Wilmington. Other 
abutters Barbara Delaney, and Lynn Wing were against this change as it 
would adversely affect their access. The town voted in 1983 at a 
special Town Meeting to accept entire length of Marion Street to 
official map. Article requires 2/3rds vote. Yes 66 No 121 Article 
fails. 



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Before this article began the Moderator read procedure for reconsideration of 
an article in answer to an inqpairy from a voter. 

ARTICLE 44. (drawn #13) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to remove certain restrictions contained in a deed from the Town of 
Wilmington to Joseph E. Albowicz recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1960, Page 549; being the same premises conveyed to Mary A. Keefe, 
the petitioner and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 
2447, Page 397; to allow the subdivision of a certain parcel of land shown as 
Parcel 157 on Assessor's Map 44 bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Massachusetts Avenue, fifty (50) feet; 

EASTERLY by Lot 203 on a plan hereinafter mentioned, one hundred (100) 
feet ; 

SOUTHERLY by Lot 208 on said plan, fifty (50) feet; and 
WESTERLY by Lot 206 on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said premises were conveyed subject to the restriction for the benefit of the 
grantor that the premises conveyed shall become part of the grantee's 
contiguous premises recorded at Middlesex North Registry of Deeds Book 2447, 
Page 397, and being further bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY by Massachusetts Avenue, one hundred (100) feet; 
EASTERLY by River Street, one hundred (100) feet; 
SOUTHERLY by Lot 199, on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
WESTERLY by Lot 204, on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 

being lots 200 through 205 inclusive, containing 15,000 square feet all as 
shown on a plan entitled Pinegrove Park, Silver Lake, Massachusetts, by John 
S. Grossman, C.E., recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan 
Book 26, Plan 25; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Anne Arsenault, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to remove restrictions from the Deed to Joseph C. Albowicz, 
recorded with the Middlesex North District, Registry of Deeds, Book 
1960, Page 549 and subsequent deeds and to further authorize the minimum 
fair market compensation value to be set at $5,000." Board of Assessors 
fair market value to release is $26,150. Moderator stated unless 
petitioner agrees with value set by Assessor, he will have to rule 
motion out of order. Motion is amended to read $26,150. Planning Board 
and Finance Committee recommend approval with amendment. Motion 
seconded and voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #1) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to sell and convey to Elaine Raposa, a certain parcel of Town-owned 
land shown as Parcels 33 and 34 on Assessor's Map 49 bounded and described as 
follows: 

WESTERLY by Birch Street, one hundred twenty-five (125) feet; 
NORTHERLY by Lot 322, one hundred (100) feet; 

EASTERLY by part of Lot 262 and Lot 271; one hundred twenty- five 
(125) feet; 

SOUTHERLY by Oak Street (Currently named Manor Drive), 
one hundred (100) feet; 

being Lots 317, 318, 319, 320 and 321 containing 12,500 square feet, 
substantially as shown on plan entitled: "Maple Brook Park, Wilmington, MA, 
owned by Boston and Lowell Realty Co., 752 Old South Building, Boston, MA, 
Scale 1 inch = 80 ft., April 17, 1911" subject to such terms and conditions as 
the Selectmen may determine, including the following restrictions: 



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For the benefit of the grantor that the premises herein conveyed shall be used 
as a single residence building lot and that the premises herein conveyed shall 
not be divided or subdivided either with or without contiguous premises. The 
above restrictions shall run with the land herein described and shall be 
binding on the grantee, his heirs and assigns and successors in title, all in 
accordance with law. And further to set the minimum amount to be paid for 
such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Moderator asked for the motion. Attorney Ralph Dunn, representing Elaine 
Raposa began to present article but was not a voter in the Town. This article 
was then presented with some confusion, as the person who began to read 
article, Jacqueline Doucette was there only to speak to support of the 
article. This article was submitted with incorrect wording, and Moderator 
attempted to explain the need to correct wording, as all Town-owned land is 
sold under Chapter 30B through the bid process. Planning Board and Finance 
Committee recommends approval, as surplus to the needs of the Town. Town 
Manager declared land surplus, but town cannot change wording on article 
unless amended at Town Meeting. Questions were asked, was this lot a 
buildable lot. Building Inspector could not answer because all the facts are 
not known at this time. Edward Hill, as the petitioner then presented 
article, as follows removing restriction 

"I move that the Town vote to authorize transfer of the care, custody, 
management and control of certain parcels of land owned by the Town of 
Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for 
any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the 
same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further 
that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such 
interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price 
not less than $12,500 and upon such terms and conditions as shall be 
determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of 
the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said 
parcels and interest are described as Map 49, Parcels 33 and 34." 
Motion seconded. Article needs 2/3rds vote. Yes 119, No 72 Article 
fails. 

ARTICLE 46. (drawn #3) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington in 
accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 19, Parcels 
29A, 30 and a part of 29, further described on Home Park Plan #3 as lots 306- 
313 and 114-116 located on Miles Avenue; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion to pass over this article. Seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 47. (drawn #45) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington 
in accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon 
such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 6, 
Parcels 118, 124 and 125; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Craig Newhouse, "I move to withdraw this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to withdraw. 

This was last article to be drawn. Moderator thanked Town Meeting for their 
attendance and Motion to adjourn was made. Seconded and so voted to adjourn, 
at 7:03 P.M. 



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ARTICLE 48. (drawn #10) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington 
in accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon 
such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 70, 
Parcel 26; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I make a motion to pass over this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 49. (drawn #6) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to sell certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington 
in accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon 
such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 
70, Parcels 39A and 39; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by William G. Hooper, Jr., "I move that we pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted, pass over. 

ARTICLE 50. (drawn #22) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington in 
accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 6, Parcels 
120, 121, 122 and 123; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Craig Newhouse, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to 
be no longer needed for municipal purpose, and for the express purpose 
of conveying the same, all in accordance with Chapter 30B of the General 
Laws of Massachusetts, and further that the Selectmen be and are 
authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by 
the Town of Wilmington for a price not less than $ 46. 793 and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are 
described as Map 6, Parcels 120, 121, 122 and 123. Some discussion 
followed as to the Zoning of these parcels. Zoning is R-10. Finance 
Committee and Planning Board recommends approval. Fair market value, 
$46,793 by Assessor's office. Town Manager declares surplus to needs of 
Town. Motion seconded and so voted to approve. Vote Yes 152 No 1. 
So voted. 

ARTICLE 51. (drawn #38) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell a certain parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington in 
accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 8, Parcel 
19A; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Craig Newhouse, "I move to withdraw this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to withdraw. 



-155- 



ARTICLE 52. (drawn #43) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in Accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 19, Parcel 18; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Eric Pote, the petitioner, "I move to withdraw this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw. 

ARTICLE 53. (drawn #41) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 308; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 9, Parcel 62; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Eric Pote, "I move that the Town vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen 
of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no 
longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of 
conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 308; 
and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and 
convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington 
for a price of not less than $71,875 and upon such terms and conditions 
as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 9, Parcel 62. 
Motion seconded. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommends 
approval. Assessor's mar)cet value set at $71,875. Martha Stevenson, 
Chandler Road, could parcel be used as a mini-park to perhaps help some 
of the problems. Town Manager, this land is deemed surplus to needs of 
the Town and urged support of the Property Review Board. This would 
assist the Town with much needed revenue also to assist a Wilmington 
resident with a parcel of land to build on for a fair market value. 
Motion is voted. Yes 153 No 1 So voted. 

ARTICLE 54. (drawn #12) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 308; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as follows: Assessor's Map 36, Parcel 104; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 



-156- 



Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 55. (drawn #20) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as follows: Assessor's Map 50, Parcel 76; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr., "I move to pass over this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 56. (drawn #27) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer of 
the care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town of 
Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter BOB; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest are described as follows: Assessor's Map 77, Parcel 4B; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Edward McLaughlin, Concord Street, petitioner, "I move to 
withdraw this article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 57. (#32) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington in 
accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and interest are described as Map 70, Parcels 
1, 3 and 4; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Craig Newhouse, petitioner, "I move to withdraw this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted to withdraw, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 58. (drawn #14) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a town way, 
the layout of Dewey Avenue as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out 
by the Selectmen under the provisions of the law relating to assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and which, 
with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular 
description; and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain 
such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 44, Section 7, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of engineering and construction of said way, and 
for the payment of any dounages resulting from the taking of land and slope 
easements and other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Chester A. Bruce, Jr, "I move to pass over this article." 
Motion seconded and so voted. 



-157- 



ARTICLE 59. (drawn #2) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a town way, 
the layout of Somerville Avenue as recommended by the Planning Board and laid 
out by the Selectmen under the provisions of the law relating to assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and which, 
with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular 
description; and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain 
such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 44, Section 7, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of engineering and construction of said way, and 
for the payment of any deunages resulting from the taking of land and slope 
easements and other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael Caira, "I move to pass over this article". Motion 
seconded and so voted. 



ARTICLE 60. (drawn #25) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a town 
way, the layout of Oxford Road as recommended by the Planning Board and laid 
out by the Selectmen under the provisions of the law relating to assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and which, 
with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular 
description; and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain 
such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 44, Section 7, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of engineering and construction of said way, and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope 
easements and other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George Hooper, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

The attendance at Town Meeting was as follows and adjourned in early evening 
at 7:03 p.m. 

10:45 A.M. - 155 3:00 P.M. - 443 

1:30 P.M. - 324 NonVoters - 39 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 1994 



Total By Transfer By Taxation 
Appropriation 

24,500 24,500 

50,703 50,703 

15.326 15.326 

90,529 90,529 
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 1995 



Total 

Appropriation By Transfer By Taxation 

SCHOOL BUDGET 14,812,070 14,812,070 

MUNICIPAL BUDGET 16,638,635 1,339,540 15,299,095 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 282,820 282,820 

WARRANT ARTICLES 7, 350 7. 350 

TOTAL BUDGET 31,740.875 

STATUTORY CHARGES 3,802,212 
TOTAL 35.543.087 



-158- 



AVAILABLE FUNDS 



CEMETERY SALES 25,000 

CEMETERY INTEREST 15,000 

CAPITAL PROJECT CLOSEOUT 6,410 

WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 1.293. 130 

TOTAL 1,339, 540 



STATE PRIMARY - SEPTEMBER 20, 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the nsune of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in Elections to vote at the Town Hall, Precincts 1, 2 and 5 and the 
Wildwood School, Precincts 3, 4 and 6 on Tuesday, the twentieth day of 
September, 1994 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 



U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS . . . Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT .... Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT . Representative 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY District 

CLERK OF COURTS County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS District 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER County 



The results were as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 1363 

Blanks 619 

Total 1982 



GOVERNOR 

George A. Bachrach 345 

Michael J. Barrett 464 

Mark Roosevelt 724 

Blanks 449 

Total 1982 



LT. GOVERNOR 

Marc D. Draisen 420 

Robert K. Massie 851 

Blanks 711 

Total 1982 



-159- 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

L. Scott Harshbarger 1415 

Blanks 567 

Total 1982 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

William Francis Galvin 703 

Augusto F. Grace 859 

Blanks 420 

Total 1982 

TREASURER 

Shannon P. O'Brien 1144 

Blanks 838 

Total 1982 

AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 1287 

Blanks 695 

Total 1982 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (Sixth District) 

Nicholas J. Costello 441 

Jeffery J. Hayward 251 

F. John Monahan 235 

John F. Tierney 580 

Blanks 475 

Total 1982 

COUNCILLOR (Fifth District) 

Edward J. Carroll 342 

Paul DelioB 189 

Patricia A. Dowling 807 

Blanks 644 

Total 1982 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (1st Essex & Middlesex) 

Klaus Kubierschky (Write-In) 23 

Others 1 

Blanks 1958 

Total 1982 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (20th Middlesex) 

James R. Miceli 1417 

John C. Desforge 309 

Blanks 42 

Total 1768 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (23rd Middlesex) 

Virginia E. Mooney 80 

Richard C. Wilde 80 

Blanks 54 

Total 214 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (Northern District) 

Thomas F. Reilly 1148 

Blanks 834 

Total 1982 



-160- 



CLERK OF COURTS (Middlesex County) 

Edward J. Sullivan 847 

James P. Kennedy 625 

Blanks 510 

Total 1982 

REGISTER OF DEEDS (Northern District - Middlesex County) 

Walter J. Flynn 145 

Richard P. Howe, Jr 117 

Patricia A. Kirwin Keilty 193 

Edward J. Kennedy 329 

Dennis E. McHugh 117 

Dennis Scannell 53 

David A. Shaughnessy 57 

Frederick L. Simon 291 

Karin Theodores 312 

Blanks 368 

Total 1982 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (Middlesex County) 

Francis X. Flaherty 543 

Gerald J. Flynn, Jr 492 

Douglas E. MacDonald 216 

John M. MacGillivray 187 

Blanks 544 

Total 1982 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

John R. Lakian 125 

W. Mitt Romney 621 

Blanks _25 

Total 771 

GOVERNOR 

William F. Weld 693 

Blanks 78 

Total 771 

LT. GOVERNOR 

Argeo Paul Cellucci 608 

Blanks 163 

Total 771 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Janis M. Berry 456 

Guy A. Carbone 176 

Blanks 139 

Total 771 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Arthur E. Chase 291 

Peter V. Forman 290 

Blanks 190 

Total 771 

TREASURER 

Joseph Daniel Malone 663 

Blanks 138 

Total 771 



-161- 



AUDITOR 

Forrester A. "Tim" Clark, Jr 353 

Earle B. Stroll 191 

Blanks 221 

Total 771 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (Sixth District) 

Peter G. Torkildsen 609 

Blanks 162 

Total 771 

COUNCILLOR (Fifth District) 

John Walsh 497 

Blanks 274 

Total 771 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (1st Essex & Middlesex) 

Bruce E. Tarr 469 

Blanks 302 

Total 771 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (20th Middlesex) 

Al Meegan 441 

Blanks 181 

Total 622 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (23rd Middlesex) 

Marianne Brenton 110 

Blanks 39 

Total 149 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (Northern District) 

Blanks 771 

CLERK OF COURTS (Middlesex County) 

Blanks 771 

REGISTER OF DEEDS (Middlesex County - Northern District) 

John L. Noonan 513 

Blanks 258 

Total 771 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (Middlesex County) 

Blanks 771 

The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. in both polling places and closed at 8:00 
p.m. and results were announced at 11:00 p.m. 2,753 persons voted, this 
includes sixty (60) absentee ballots which reflects 24% of the 11,391 
registered voters. 



DISTRICT WIDE RECOUNT - REGISTER OF DEEDS. NORTHERN DISTRICT 
OCTOBER 3. 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

In the matter of the district wide recount. Democratic Primary for Registry ( 
Deeds. This procedure was held in the Town of Wilmington, on Monday October 
3, 1994 at 6:30 P.M. in Room 9 at Town Hall. 



-162- 



All was made ready according to Chapter 54, Section 135, 135A of the General 
Laws. Board of Registrars, Town Clerk, Asst. Town Clerk and eight election 
workers were used for the process. A Police Officer and Town Counsel were 
also present. Each candidate was represented by observers and their own 
Counsel . 

The results were as follows: 



CANDIDATES 

Walter J. Flynn 145 

Richard P. Howe, Jr 117 

Patricia A. Kirwin Keilty 193 

Edward J. Kennedy 329 

Dennis E. McHugh 117 

Dennis Scannell 53 

David A. Shaughnessy 57 

Frederick L. Simon 289 

Karin Theodores 312 

Blanks 370 

Total 1982 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8. 1994 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to 
vote in Elections to vote at the Town Hall, Precincts 1, 2 and 5 and at the 
Wildwood School, Precincts 3, 4 and 6 on Tuesday, the eighth day of November, 
1994 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 



U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR " 

ATTORNEY GENERAL " 

SECRETARY " 

TREASURER " 

AUDITOR " 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS .... 6th Congressional Dist 

COUNCILLOR 5th Councillor Dist 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 1st Essex & Middlesex 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT . . 20th & 23rd Middlesex 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern District 

CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County 



QUESTIONS 

#1 - Regulating Spending on Ballot Question Campaigns 
#2 - Seat Belt Law 

#3 - Changing the Law Regarding Student Fees 
#4 - Term Limits 

#5 - Opening of Retail Stores on Sunday Mornings and Certain Holidays 

#6 - Graduated Income Tax 

#7 - Personal Income Tax Changes 

#8 - State Highway Fund Changes 

#9 - Prohibiting Rent Control 

#10- Single Payer Health Care System - Non Binding - Local Question 



-163- 



The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by Town Clerk, Kathleen Scanlon at the Town 
Hall and Asst. Town Clerk Carolyn Kenney at the Wildwood Street School. The 
zero sheets were removed from the machines to show all interested parties that 
they were clear and then voting began. 

Election day was a very busy day for both polling places with lines all day in 
all precincts. Voters took extra time voting because this election the ballot 
cpjestion summary was not printed on the ballot in the machine. Printed 
material was given to all voters at the polls and most had prepared before 
coming to the polls. A total of 8,047 voted, plus one Federal Ballot. This 
included 283 absentee ballots. The vote reflected 68% of the 11,703 
registered voters. When the polls closed at 8:00 p.m., voting continued in 
some of the precincts until 9:00 p.m. Declaration of the vote was made at 
12:45 a.m. for the following: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 4338 

W. Mitt Romney 3556 

Laualeigh Dozier 45 

William A. Ferguson, Jr 16 

Blanks 93 

Total 8048 



GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Weld and Cellucci 

Roosevelt and Massie .... 
Cook and Crawford. .... 

Rebello and Giske 

Blanks 

Total 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

L. Scott Harshbarger 4991 

Janis M. Berry 2651 

Blanks 406 

Total 8048 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Arthur E. Chase 2540 

William Francis Galvin 4048 

Peter C. Everett 355 

Blanks HQs 

Total 8048 



TREASURER 

Joseph Daniel Malone . . 
Shannon Patricia O'Brien 
Susan B. Poulin . . . . 
Thomas P. Tierney . . . 

Blanks 

Total 



AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 5234 

Forrester A. "Tim" Clark, Jr 1695 

Geoff M. Weil 254 

Blanks 865 

Total 8048 



-164- 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (Sixth District) 

Peter G. Torkildsen 3863 

John F. Tierney 3258 

Benjamin A. Gatchell 184 

Blanks 743 

Total 8048 

COUNCILLOR (Fifth District) 

Patricia A. Dowling 3957 

John Michael Walsh 2650 

Blanks 1441 

Total 8048 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (Ist Essex & Middlesex) 

Klaus Kubierschky 3489 

Bruce E. Tarr 2922 

Blanks 1637 

Total 8048 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (20th Middlesex) 

Jcunes R. Miceli 4873 

Al Meegan 1509 

Blanks 286 

Total 6668 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (23rd Middlesex) 

Marianne Brenton 751 

Richard C. Wilde 459 

Blanks 170 

Total 1380 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (Northern District) 

Thomas F. Reilly 5252 

Blanks 2796 

Total 8048 

CLERK OF COURTS (Middlesex County) 

Edward J. Sullivan 5062 

Blanks 2986 

Total 8048 

REGISTER OF DEEDS (Northern District - Middlesex County) 

Richard P. Howe, Jr 3097 

John L. Noonan 2829 

Patrick A. O'Connor 736 

Blanks 1386 

Total 8048 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (Middlesex County) 

Francis X. Flaherty 3938 

Barbara J. Collins 2547 

Blanks 1563 

Total 8048 

OUESTIONS 

QUESTION #1 

Yes 3091 

No 4522 

Blanks 435 

Total 8048 



-165- 



QUESTION #2 

Yes 3954 

No 3769 

Blanks 325 

Total 8048 

QUESTION /3 

Yes 3662 

No 3671 

Blanks 715 

Total 8048 

QUESTION /4 

Yes 4162 

No 3398 

Blanks 488 

Total 8048 

QUESTION #5 

Yes 3962 

No 3770 

Blanks 316 

Total 8048 

QUESTION /6 

Yes 1943 

No 5729 

Blanks 376 

Total 8048 

QUESTION #7 

Yes 1846 

No 5779 

Blanks 423 

Total 8048 

QUESTION #8 

Yes 5756 

No 1874 

Blanks 418 

Total 8048 

QUESTION #9 

Yes 4290 

No 3131 

Blanks 62 7 

Total 8048 

QUESTION #10 

Yes 2389 

No 2481 

Blanks 3178 

Total 8048 



-166- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



June 30, 1994 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The General Purpose Financial Statements of the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1994, are submitted 
herewith. This report was prepared by the Town Accountant. Responsibility 
for both the accuracy of the presented data and the completeness and fairness 
of the presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the Town. 

I believe the data, as presented, is accurate in all material aspects; that it 
is presented in a manner designed to fairly set forth the financial position 
and results of operations of the Town as measured by the financial activity of 
its various funds; and that all disclosures necessary to enable the reader to 
gain the maximum understanding of the Town's financial affairs have been 
included. 



Respectfully submitted. 




-167- 



Town of Wilmington, Massachusetta 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 



Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Groups 169 
Notes to Financial Statements 170 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 172 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet - Special Revenue 
Accounts 174 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - Special Revenue Accounts 175 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity - General Fund 177 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department 
Operations 186 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Project Fund 187 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 188 

Schedule of Trust Funds 189 



-168- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30. 1994 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



TRUST 
AGENCY 



LONG-TERM 

DEBT TOTAL 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
INV.DEF.COMP.PLAN 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 

DEFERRED SALARIES 



273.157.89 302.320.40 376.095.78 1,061,950.24 



1,061,591.63 



(244,233.64) 
1,115,192.49 
27,532.95 
343,900.66 
61,558.47 
349,871.11 1,199.84 
88,578.25 328,064.97 
260,604.00 



496,876.00 



0.00 2,013,524.31 

1,061,591.63 

(244,233.64) 
1,115,192.49 
27.532.95 
343,900.66 
61.558.47 
351.070.95 
416.643.22 
260.604.00 
496.876.00 

6.460.000.00 6,460,000.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



3.609.785.81 892.189.21 376.095.78 1.558.826.24 6,460,000.00 12.364.261.04 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES 

LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

OTHER LIABILITIES 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 

GENERAL OBLIG BONDS PAY 



1,899,723.47 104,528.16 
33,611.40 



912,396.63 
1,986,633.93 589.868.81 



72,861.95 2,077,113.58 
791,837.00 825,448.40 

912,396.63 
2,576,502.74 
6.460.000.00 6.460.000.00 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



4.798,754.03 728.008.37 



0.00 864.698.95 6.460.000.00 12.851.461.35 



FUND BALANCES: 

RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 
UNRESERVED: 

UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 
TOTAL FUND BAL'S 



597.688.00 

352.615.00 

(1,786,656.22) 164.180.84 376,095.78 341,512.29 
(1,188,968.22) 164,180.84 376,095.78 694,127.29 



597,688.00 
352,615.00 



0.00 (904,867.31) 
0.00 45.435.69 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BAL'S 



3.609.785.81 892.189.21 376.095.78 1.558.826.24 6.460.000.00 12.896.897.04 



-169- 



TOmr OF WILNIVGTOII, MASSACBUSrrrS 



MOTES TO FIKAIICIAL STATEMEirrS 
Jane 30, 1994 

g ■■iinr of Sionificarr Acccur.r ire; Pclicieg 

The accoaating policies for fir.ar.cial reporting purposes of the Town of 
ffllaington confom to generally accepted accounting principles for 
local govemaental units except as indicated in Hote 2. The following 
is a suaeary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities ir. several funds and one 
account group in order to comply with the liaitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
Town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial stateinents in this report into five generic fund 
types and two broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERWMEyTAL VJiiPS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fond of 
the Town. It is used to account for all financial reeooroM 
except those required to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - This special revenue fund is used to 
acccjr.t for the proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance 
Acr ar.d rheir expenditures as prescribed by the Office of ReTenoe 
Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Others - This special revenue fund is used 
to account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other 
than general revenue sharing, expendable trust or major capital 
projects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for specific 
purposes . 

Capital Projects Fund - This fund is used to account for the 
purchase or construction of major capital facilities. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency F-jnds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/ or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable tr^^st and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a Conner that permits the periodic measurements 
of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net income in order 
to demonstrate niaintenance of capital. Expenda^ile trust funds are 
accounted for m essentially the same manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of 
operations. 

ACCCVV-T GROUP 



Zez' ='z l-s rilitie; - Icng-terr: liabilities expected to 

ze : := are accumulated in the general 

: This account group is not a 

t~'z. :er .= i -_^r. the measurement of financial 

positic- ;re, is not involved with a measurement of the 

results :. rations- 



B . Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
incurred. 

Revenue Recognition - Property tax revenues are recognized when 
they become available. Available means then due or past due and 
receivable within the current period or expected to be collected 
soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the 
current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is 
received. Receipts during the sixty days immediately following 
the close of the fiscal year are also recognized as available 
revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual rec[uirements of 
the numerous individual programs are used as guidance. There are, 
however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, monies 
must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any 
amounts will be paid to the Town. Therefore, revenues are 
recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, 
monies are virtually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and 
are usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to 
accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash 
disbursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and 
expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, 
as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenues that are 
measurable but not available have been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 30, 1994. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 
For years prior to 1985, the Town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The Town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statement 
presentation for 1985. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the Town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

a. Retirement benefits are provided for a "pay-as-you-go" basis 
rather than an acceptable actuarial cost method (see note 5). 

b. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at 
the time purchases are made rather than being capitalized in a 
general fixed asset group of accounts. 



-171- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AXD CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUtiO TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



Fiduciary 

Fund Types Total 

General Special Capital Expendable (> 

(Net) Revenue Projects Trust Only) 

REVENUES: 

General Property Taxes 21,923,114.14 0.00 21,923.114.14 

Tax Liens 384,701.60 103,708.26 488.409.86 

Special Assess«nts 55,888.80 4,338.85 60.227.65 

Excise 1,247,981.69 0.00 1,247,981.69 

Penalties 321,513.85 0.00 321,513.85 

Licenses and Permits 306,728.75 81,246.85 18,933.60 406.909.20 

Intergoverrwental 4.463,908.88 1,974,661.97 827.18 6,439.398.03 

Charges for Services 2.040,374.00 2.934,948.59 326,801.04 5,302.123.63 

Fines 164,014.10 0.00 164.014.10 

Fees 54,148.70 0.00 54.148.70 

Interest Earninfls 46,444.67 4.238.50 14,782.26 65,465.43 

Other 368,587.02 161,760.62 706,302.68 1,236.650.32 

Total Revenues 31.377.406.20 5.264,903.64 0.00 1,067,646.76 37,709,956.60 

EXPENDITURES: 



General Government 


910,645.61 


13,493. 


.30 




722,002.24 1,646,141.15 


Public Safety 


3,695,919.08 


62.225. 


.26 




259,031.09 4,017,175.43 


Hunan Services 


432,436.31 


401.299. 


,13 




833,735.44 


Public Works 


3,540,026.85 


1,714.879. 


.61 


395.10 


125.00 5.255,426.56 


Connuiity Development 


344,986.26 


28.766. 


.85 




373,753.11 


Building Maintenance 


1,779,958.54 


0. 


.00 




45.126.49 1.825.085.03 


Education 


14,048,542.19 


1.317,338. 


.60 




2.348.12 15,368.228.91 


Recreation 


70.277.53 


161,473. 


.89 




231.751.42 


Veterans' Services 


15.684.42 


0. 


.00 




15,684.42 


Debt and Interest 


2.856,100.78 


0. 


.00 




2,856,100.78 


Unclassified 


2.747,998.11 


0. 


.00 




2,747,998.11 


Statutory Charges 


3,207,339.21 


0. 


.00 




3,207,339.21 


Warrant Articles 


219,905.31 


0. 


.00 




219.905.31 


Refinds 


0.00 


18,827. 


.75 




18.827.75 


Other-Bonds, Deduct., Judge. 


0.00 


0. 


.00 




0.00 


Total Expenditures 


33,869,820.20 


3,718,304.39 


395.10 


1.028,632.94 38.617,152.63 



Excess (deficiency) of 

Revenues over Expenditures(2,492.414.00) 1,546,599.25 (395.10) 39,013.82 (907,196.03) 



-172- 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds 0.00 

Operating Transfers In 1,645,313.00 1,645,313.00 

Operating Transfers Out (1,575,782.00) (49,531.00) (20,000.00)(1,645,313.00) 

State and County Charges 0.00 0.00 

Court Judgements 0.00 0.00 



Total Other Financing 
Sources (Uses) 1,645,313.00 (1,575,782.00) (49,531.00) (20,000.00) 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 

Uses (847,101.00) (29,182.75) (49,926.10) 19,013.82 (907,196.03) 



FcrxJ Balance July 1, 1993 (1,365,117.01) 193,363.59 426,021.88 675,113.47 (70,618.07) 

Increase/Decrease in Provision 

for Abatements and Exemptions (490,613.79) (490,613.79) 

Fund Balance June 30, 1994 (1,721,604.22) 164,180.84 376,095.78 694,127.29 (487,200.31) 



-173- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30, 1994 



RES. FOR REVOLVING WATER TOTAL 

APPROP. FUNDS 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
INV.DEF.COMP.PLAN 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 

DEFERRED SALARIES 



(367.404.70) 12,738.76 



243,983.50 92,429.53 320,573.31 302,320.40 



1,199.84 1,199.84 
328,064.97 328,064.97 
260,604.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



(106,800.70) 12,738.76 



243.983.50 92.429.53 649.838.12 892.189.21 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCES 

LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 59,251.42 
OTHER LIABILITIES 
DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 260,604.00 
GENERAL OBLIG BONDS PAY 



35,431.70 9,845.04 104.528.16 
33,611.40 33,611.40 



329,264.81 589,868.81 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



319,855.42 



0.00 35,431.70 372,721.25 728,008.37 



FUND BALANCES: 

RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 
UNRESERVED: 

UNRESERVED -UNDES I GNATED 
TOTAL FUND BAL'S 



(426,656.12) 12,738.76 
(426,656.12) 12,738.76 



243,983.50 56,997.83 277,116.87 164,180.84 
243,983.50 56,997.83 277,116.87 164,180.84 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BAL'S 



(106,800.70) 12,738.76 



243,983.50 92,429.53 649,838.12 892,189.21 



-174- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



Grants Gifts Reserved for Revolving Water Total 

Appropriation Funds 

REVENUES: 

General Property Taxes 0.00 

Tax Liens 103,708.26 103,708.26 

Special Assessments 4,338.85 4,338.85 

Excise 0.00 

Penalties 0.00 

Licenses and Permits 81,246.85 81,246.85 

Intergovernmental 936,404.33 956,092.76 82,164.88 1,974,661.97 

Charges for Services 2,934,948.59 2,934,948.59 

F i nes . 00 

Fees 0.00 

Interest Earnings 4,162.74 75.76 4,238.50 

Other 5,181.79 1,100.00 136,980.05 2,986.91 15,511.87 161,760.62 

Total Revenues 945,748.86 1,175.76 136,980.05 1,040,326.52 3,140,672.45 5,264,903.64 

EXPENDITURES: 

General Government 13,493.30 13,493.30 

Public Safety 59,788.35 450.00 1,986.91 62,225.26 

Human Services 401,299.13 401,299.13 

Public Works 313,293.01 125.00 1,401,461.60 1,714,879.61 

Community Development 27,247.74 1,519.11 28,766.85 

Bui Iding Maintenance 0.00 

Education 428,699.16 888,639.44 1,317,338.60 

Recreation 161,473.89 161,473.89 

Veterans' Services 0.00 

Debt and Interest 0.00 

Unclassified 0.00 

Statutory Charges 0.00 

Warrant Articles 0.00 

Refunds 18,827.75 18,827.75 

Other-Bonds, Deduct., Judge. 0.00 

Total Expenditures 1,243,820.69 450.00 125.00 1,053,619.35 1,420,289.35 3,718,304.39 

Excess (deficiency) of 

Revenues over Expenditures (298,071.83) 725.76 136,855.05 (13,292.83) 1,720,383.10 1,546,599.25 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 



-175- 



Proceeds of General 
Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 

Operating Transfers Out (76,795.00) 
State and County Charges 
Court Judgements 

Total Other Financing 
Sources (Uses) (76,795.00) 



(25,000.00) 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

(1, 473, 987. 00)( 1,575, 782. 00) 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 (25,000.00) 



0.00 (1,473, 987. 00)(1, 575, 782. 00) 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 

Uses (374,866.83) 725.76 111,855.05 (13,292.83) 246,396.10 (29,182.75) 



Fund Balance July 1, 1993 (51,789.29) 12,013.00 132,128.45 70,290.66 30,720.77 193,363.59 

Increase/Decrease in Provision 
for Abatements and Exemptions 

Fund Balance June 30, 1994 (426,656.12) 12,738.76 243,983.50 56,997.83 277,116.87 164,180.84 



-176- 



TOUN OF UILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 







AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 94 FROM 


APPROPRIAT ION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 














Selectmen 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


0.00 


7,000.00 


7,000.00 


6,963.44 


0.00 


36.56 






0.00 


0, 3UU . UU 


8,500.00 


8,463.44 


0.00 


36.56 






0.00 


7,042.00 


10,042.00 


8,952.29 


0.00 


1,089.71 


Elections 


Constable 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elections 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,430.00 


2,430.00 


2,302.38 


127.62 


0.00 






0.00 


9,572.00 


12,572.00 


11,354.67 


127.62 


1,089.71 


R69 i s t rdrs 




0.00 


1,690.00 


1,690.00 


1,690.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


0.00 


3,465.00 


3,465.00 


3,419.67 


45.33 


0.00 






0.00 


5 155 00 


5 155 00 












00 


1 ortCi nn 
1 , cUU . UU 






. 00 


779 . 5 1 


Finance Conw. 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,500.00 


5,260.00 


5,260.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


5,700.00 


6,460.00 


5,680.49 


0.00 


779.51 


Town Manager 


Sal -Town Manager 


0.00 


0,000.00 


75,288.56 


75, 288.56 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


181,113.00 


183,953.21 


183,953.21 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


400.00 


42,162.00 


43,282.40 


39,835.73 


2,795.58 


1,051.09 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


925.00 


925.00 


925.00 


0.00 


0.00 






400.00 


299,200.00 


303,449.17 


300,002.50 


2,795.58 


1,051.09 


Town Accountant 


Sal -Town Accountant 


0.00 


54,272.00 


54,480.62 


54,480.62 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


57,529.00 


58,833.02 


58,833.02 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 


319.47 


2,020.00 


1,961.74 


2,130.28 


0.00 


150.93 






319.47 


113,821.00 


115,275.38 


115,443.92 


0.00 


150.93 


Treas/Col lector 


Sal -Finance Dir. 


0.00 


54,272.00 


54,480.62 


54,480.62 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Col lector 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


93,376.00 


94,986.74 


94,986.74 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Col lector 


Expenses 


1,686.50 


26,849.00 


24,080.27 


25,521.01 


0.00 


245.76 


Treas/CoUector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


2,119.25 


0.00 


380.75 






1,686.50 


176,997.00 


176,047.63 


177,107.62 


0.00 


626.51 



-177- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 







AMI CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUr 






FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Town Clerk 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


40,044.00 


40,197.66 


40,197.66 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


34,469.00 


34,601.30 


34,601.30 


0.00 


0.00 




Expenses 


0.00 


2, 101 .00 


4, 101 .00 


3,037.50 


89.81 


973.69 


Town Clerk 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


187.00 


187.00 


164.64 


0.00 


22.36 






0.00 


76,801.00 


79,086.96 


78,001.10 


89.81 


996.05 


Assessors 


Sal-Prin. Assessor 


0.00 


52,612.00 


52,814.35 


52,814.35 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Sal. Other 


0.00 


61 ,912.00 


61 ,912.00 


59,998.90 


0.00 


1,913.10 


Assessors 


Expenses 


0.00 


26,800.00 


26,800.00 


13,543.79 


13,256.21 


0.00 


Assessors 


Appraisals.EDP 


0.00 


29,000.00 


29,000.00 


23,014.27 


5 , 985 . 73 


0.00 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


172,824.00 


173,026.35 


151,871.31 


19,241.94 


1,913.10 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


0.00 


57,200.00 


57,200.04 


57,200.04 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


57,200.00 


57,200.04 


57,200.04 


0.00 


0.00 


Pertnanent Bid 


Com Salaries 


0.00 


500.00 


500.00 


410.85 


0.00 


89.15 


Permanent Bid Com Expenses 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


100.00 






0.00 


600.00 


600.00 


410.85 


0.00 


189.15 


General Government Subtotal 


2,405.97 


926,370.00 


937,372.53 


910,645.61 


22,300.28 


6.832.61 


PROTECTION OF 


PERSS & PROPERTY: 














Police 


Salary-Chief 


0.00 


68,834.00 


69,099.20 


69,099.20 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Dep. Chief 


0.00 


56.107.00 


56,322.73 


56,322.73 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal .-Lieut. 


0.00 


100,057.00 


100,441.59 


100,441.59 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


255,557.00 


256,536.77 


256,536.77 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,037,754.00 


1,029,490.79 


1,029.490.79 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal . -Clerical 


0.00 


60,625.00 


60,980.23 


60,980.23 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Fill In Costs 


0.00 


210,940.00 


227,829.33 


227.829.33 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Pd. Holidays 


0.00 


64,065.00 


64,065.00 


63.370.28 


0.00 


694.72 


Police 


Sal. -Special! St 


0.00 


10,200.00 


10,200.00 


10,200.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal . - Incentive 


0.00 


37,200.00 


37,200.00 


35.200.00 


0.00 


2.000.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Night Diff 


0.00 


29,160.00 


33,141.00 


33,141.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Expenses 


0.00 


114,960.00 


120,786.55 


120,786.55 


0.00 


0.00 



-178- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 









AMT 


CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 














FY 


94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 








FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Police 




Sick Leave Buyback 




0.00 


10,120.00 


10,120.00 


10,039.36 


0.00 


80.64 


Pol ice 




Furnish & Equip. 




0.00 


onn Art 


y> ,yuu.ou 


35,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


2.091,479.00 


2,112,113.19 


2,109,337.83 


0.00 


2,775.36 






Sal -Chief 




0.00 




55 266 16 


55 266 16 




. 00 


Fire Dept. 




Sal. -Dep. Chief 




0.00 


50,598.00 


50,792.13 


50,792.13 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


PIP P77 nn 


PP7 nn 


227 562 71 






Fire Dept. 




Sal .-Privates 




0.00 


864,249.00 


848,923.00 


847,009.58 


0.00 


1,913.42 


Fire Dept. 




Sal.-Clerk/Oisptch 




0.00 


52,771.00 


52,974.10 


52,974.10 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 




Sal . -Overtime Costs 




0.00 


140,400.00 


140,400.00 


133,268.21 


0.00 


7,131.79 


F i re Dept . 








0.00 


Ai 017 nn 


Ai 017 nn 


A1 H7n 1R 

O 1 , O r U . 1 O 


00 




Fire Dept. 




Sal.-Incentive/EMT 




0.00 


56,800.00 


56,800.00 


54,887.53 


0.00 


1,912.47 


F i re Dept . 




Sal.-O.T. Fire Alarm 




0.00 


9 545.00 


10 780.33 


10 705.64 


0.00 


74 69 


Fire Dept. 




Expenses 




0.00 


47,237.00 


50,954.74 


50,216.43 


138.31 


600.00 


Fire Dept. 




Sick Leave Buyt>ack 




0.00 


11,389.00 


12,259.49 


12,259.49 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


1,562.197.00 


1.568.629.95 


1,556,812.16 


138.31 


11,679.48 


Enter. Mgmt. 




Salaries 




0.00 


1,600.00 


1.600.08 


1.600.08 


0.00 


0.00 


Enter. Mgmt. 




Expenses 




0.00 


1.400.00 


1.400.00 


1.400.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Enter. Mgmt. 




Furnish & Equip. 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.08 


3.000.08 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 




Salaries 




0.00 


20,438.00 


20,506.24 


20.506.24 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 




Cont. Services 




0.00 


5,500.00 


5,572.98 


5,572.98 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 




Expenses 




0.00 


500.00 


689.79 


689.79 


0.00 


0.00 










0.00 


26,438.00 


26,769.01 


26,769.01 


0.00 


0.00 


Prot. Persons & Prop. Subtotal 




0.00 


3,683,114.00 


3,710,512.23 


3,695,919.08 


138.31 


14,454.84 


PUBLIC WORKS: 




















Engineering Di 




Salaries 




0.00 


73,717.00 


74,058.61 


74,058.61 


0.00 


0.00 


Engineering Di 


i V. 


Salaries-Part Time 




0.00 


33,180.00 


33,180.00 


30,715.20 


0.00 


2,464.80 


Engineering Di 




Expenses 




0.00 


3,800.00 


3.800.00 


2,169.86 


0.00 


1,630.14 










0.00 


110,697.00 


111,038.61 


106,943.67 


0.00 


4,094.94 



-179- 



TOWN OF UILHINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 









FISCAL 


YEAR 1994 












AMT CFWO TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Highway Division 


Sal-O.P.W. Super. 


0.00 


70,678.00 


70,950.24 


70,950.24 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Sal. -Other 


0.00 


758,088.00 


732,770.58 


728,836.97 


0.00 


3,933.61 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


2,384.76 


143,180.00 


143,751.57 


129,684.79 


0.00 


16,451.54 


Highway Division 


Rd. Mach. Exp. 


2,030.73 


60,000.00 


60,444.44 


62,374.72 


0.00 


100.45 


Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 


3,955.48 


100,391.00 


100,391.00 


100,769.52 


0.00 


3,576.96 


Highway Division 


Drainage Projects 


9,142.35 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


24,010.79 


0.00 


131.56 


HiQhwsy Division 


Public St. Lights 


0.00 


190,028.00 


190,028.00 


178, 156.82 


0.00 


1 1 ,871 . 18 


Highway Division 


C90M 


26,980.84 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


26,980.84 


0.00 


Highway Division 


C81M 


16,307.89 


60,796.00 


60,796.00 


54,884.95 


22,218.94 


0.00 






60,802.05 


1,398,161.00 


1,374,131.83 


1,349,668.80 


49,199.78 


36.065.30 


Snow & Ice Cont. 


Salaries 


0.00 


119,635.00 


113,369.62 


112,720.69 


0.00 


648.93 


Snow & Ice Cont. 


Expenses 


0.00 


173,385.00 


272,961.23 


272,961.23 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


293,020.00 


386,330.85 


385,681.92 


0.00 


648.93 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


109,632.72 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,732.00 


1,360,455.34 


10,909.38 


(0.00) 






109,632.72 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,732.00 


1,360,455.34 


10,909.38 


(0.00) 


Tree Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


80,994.00 


56,369.00 


47,944.09 


0.00 


8,424.91 


Tree Division 


Expenses 


27.50 


9,297.00 


9,297.00 


5,167.05 


0.00 


4, 157.45 






27.50 


90,291 .00 


65,666.00 


53,111.14 


0.00 


12,582.36 


Parks/Grounds Div 


.Salaries 


0.00 


133,555.00 


135,593.41 


131,665.63 


0.00 


3,927.78 


Parks/Grounds Div 


.Expenses 


301.26 


28,353.00 


28,553.00 


28,272.88 


0.00 


581.38 






301.26 


161,908.00 


164,146.41 


159,938.51 


0.00 


4,509.16 


Cemetery Division Salaries 


0.00 


102,990.00 


102,990.00 


102,929.82 


0.00 


60.18 


Cemetery Division Expenses 


5,164.46 


25,497.00 


25,497.00 


21,297.65 


9,363.81 


0.00 






5,164.46 


128,487.00 


128,487.00 


124,227.47 


9,363.81 


60.18 


Public Uorks Subtotal 


175,927.99 


3,444,296.00 


3,491,532.70 


3,540,026.85 


69,472.97 


57,960.87 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 














Board of Health 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


46,529.00 


46,707.99 


46,707.99 


0.00 


0.00 



-180- 



TOWN OF UILHINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 199A 







AMT 


CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 


94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Board of Health 


Sal-Other 




0.00 


75, 161 .00 


75, 161 .00 


72,656.71 


0.00 


2,504.29 


Board of Health 


Expenses 




0.00 


6,100.00 


6,211.51 


6,192.92 


0.00 


18.59 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 




0.00 


14,581.00 


14,581.00 


14,580.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Board of Health 


Furnish & Equip. 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 








0.00 


142,371 .00 


142,661 .50 


140, 138.58 


0.00 


2,522.92 


Sealer Wts/Meas. 


Salaries 




0.00 


3 , 780 . 00 


3, 780.00 


3, 780.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Sealer Wts/Meas. 


Expenses 




0.00 


80.00 


80.00 


0.00 


0.00 


80.00 








00 


3,860.00 


3,860.00 


3,780.00 


0.00 


80.00 


Planning/Conserv. 


Sal -Director 




0.00 


46,911.00 


46,911 .00 


38,250.27 


0.00 


8,660.73 


Planning/Conserv. 


Sal-Other 




0.00 


58,956.00 


59,801.50 


59,801.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Planning/Conserv. 


Expenses 




630.35 


5,190.00 


5,190.00 


4,566.60 


850.00 


403.75 








630.35 


111,057.00 


111,902.50 


102,618.37 


850.00 


9,064.48 


Bldg. Inspector 


Sal -Bldg Inspector 




00 


46,529.00 


46,708.01 


46,708.01 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Sal. Other 




0.00 


49,321.00 


49,788.94 


49,788.94 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Expenses 




0.00 


3,272.00 


3,272.00 


1,952.36 


0.00 


1,319.64 


Bldg. Inspector 


Furnish & Equip. 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 








0.00 


99, 122.00 


99,768.95 


98,449.31 


0.00 


1 3 1 9 . 64 


Conmunity Development Subtotal 




630.35 


356,410.00 


358,192.95 


344,986.26 


850.00 


12,987.04 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 


















Public Buildings 


Sal -Super. 




0.00 


63,735.00 


63,980.50 


63,980.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Sal-Other 




0.00 


1,163,985.00 


1,163,985.00 


1,145,718.03 


0.00 


18,266.97 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 




0.00 


209,391.00 


209,941.93 


207,885.04 


2,056.89 


0.00 


Public Bui Idings 


Electric-Town Bldgs. 




0.00 


74,160.00 


80,528.51 


80,528.51 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Uti I ities-Town Bldgs 




0.00 


61,196.00 


59,963.20 


59,963.20 


0.00 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Expenses -Town Bldgs. 




17.38 


60,060.00 


60,614.31 


60,470.34 


161.35 


(0.00) 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Expenses -School Bldg 




0.00 


93,940.00 


96,556.46 


96,556.46 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Furn. & Equip. 




0.00 


12.000.00 


12,000.00 


11,999.94 


0.00 


0.06 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Asbestos Repair 




0.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


1,270.00 


1,730.00 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Roof Repairs 




0.00 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


1,586.52 


0.00 


413.48 


Public Bui Idings 


HVAC Repairs 




0.00 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 



-181- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 







AMT CFWO TO 
FY 94 FROM 
FISCAL 1993 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1994 


TRANSFER & 
APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1994 


EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1994 


CARRY FORWARD 
FISCAL 1994 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1994 






17.38 


1,793,467.00 


1,802,569.91 


1,779,958.54 


3,948.24 


18,680.51 


Public Buildings Subtotal 


17.38 


1,793,467.00 


1,802,569.91 


1,779,958.54 


3,948.24 


18,680.51 


HUMAN SERVICES: 
Veterans 
Veterans 
Veterans 


Salary 

Expenses 

Assistance 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


5,200.00 
1,325.00 
15,000.00 


5,220.00 
1,325.00 
15,000.00 


5,220.00 
1,138.92 
9,325.50 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
186.08 
5,674.50 






0.00 


21,525.00 


21.545.00 


15,684.42 


0.00 


5,860.58 


Library 
Library 
Library 


Salary-Di rector 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
194.92 


50,595.00 
233,485.00 
63,317.00 


50,789.55 
233,485.00 
64,021.87 


50,789.55 
225,876.91 
64,172.28 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
7.608.09 
44.51 






194.92 


347,397.00 


348,296.42 


340,838.74 


0.00 


7,652.60 


Recreation 
Recreation 
Recreation 


Salary-Di rector 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


50,595.00 
21,000.00 
2,700.00 


50,789.55 
21,000.00 
2,700.00 


50,789.55 
16,787.98 
2,700.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
4,212.02 
0.00 






0.00 


74,295.00 


74,489.55 


70,277.53 


0.00 


4,212.02 


Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


35,340.00 
26,000.00 
30,018.00 


35,474.93 
26,000.00 
30,018.00 


35,474.93 
25,792.00 
29,010.70 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
208.00 
1,007.30 






0.00 


91,358.00 


91,492.93 


90,277.63 


0.00 


1,215.30 


Historical Conn. 
Historical Cofnm. 
Historical Conm 


Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 
1,533.00 
0.00 


800.00 
850.00 
0.00 


890.75 
850.00 
0.00 


890.75 
261.19 
0.00 


0.00 
2,121.81 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 






1,533.00 


1,650.00 


1,740.75 


1,151.94 


2,121.81 


0.00 


Handicapped Connm. 
Handicapped Comm. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


98.00 
0.00 


600.00 
300.00 


600.00 
300.00 


98.00 
70.00 


0.00 
230.00 


600.00 
0.00 






98.00 


900.00 


900.00 


168.00 


230.00 


600.00 



-182- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 







AMT CFWD TO 
FY 94 FROM 
FISCAL 1993 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1994 


TRANSFER & 

APPROPRIATION EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1994 FISCAL 1994 


CARRY FORWARD 
FISCAL 1994 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1994 


Human Services Subtotal 


1,825.92 


537.125.00 


538,464.65 518,398.26 


2.351.81 


19,540.50 


EDUCATION: 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 


Appropriation 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 


127,501.07 
101,598.16 
0.00 


10,866,585.00 
2,034,911.00 
0.00 


10,816,491.10 10,613,219.19 
2,088,178.76 2,189,776.92 
0.00 0.00 


330,772.98 
0.00 
0.00 


(0.00) 
0.00 
0.00 






229,099.23 


12,901,496.00 12,904,669.86 12,802,996.11 


330,772.98 


(0.00) 


Regional Voc 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


1,245,540.00 


1,245,546.08 1,245,546.08 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


1,245,540.00 


1,245,546.08 1,245,546.08 


0.00 


0.00 


Education 


Subtotal 


229,099.23 


14,147,036.00 14,150,215.94 14,048,542.19 


330,772.98 


(0.00) 



DEBT SERVICE: 



Debt & Interest Schools 


0.00 


1,044,657.00 


1,044,657.00 


1,044,656.25 


0.00 


0.75 


Debt & Interest Gen. Government 


0.00 


94,318.00 


94,318.00 


94,317.50 


0.00 


0.50 


Debt & Interest Sewer 


0.00 


596,117.00 


596,117.00 


596,116.25 


0.00 


0.75 


Debt & Interest Water 


0.00 


1,041,813.00 


1,041,813.00 


1,041,812.50 


0.00 


0.50 


Debt & Interest Auth. Fees & Misc. 


0.00 


102,060.00 


102,060.00 


79,198.28 


0.00 


22,861.72 




0.00 


2,878,965.00 


2,878,965.00 


2,856,100.78 


0.00 


22,864.22 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 


0.00 


2,878,965.00 


2,878,965.00 


2,856.100.78 


0.00 


22.864.22 


UNCLASSIFIED: 














Veterans' Retirement 


0.00 


32,951.00 


32,951.00 


31,990.80 


0.00 


960.20 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 


0.00 


21,450.00 


21,450.00 


11,919.81 


0.00 


9,530.19 


Medicare Employers' Contribution 


0.00 


66,780.00 


79,548.73 


79,548.73 


0.00 


0.00 


Unemployment Payments 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 


0.00 


25,000.00 


12,059.26 


6,459.26 


5,600.00 


0.00 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 


0.00 


6,300.00 


6,300.00 


2,352.02 


0.00 


3,947.98 


Out of State Travel 


0.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,000.00 


Computer Hardware & Software 










0.00 


0.00 


Maint. & Expenses 


0.00 


47,654.00 


52,720.99 


49,784.49 


2,936.50 


0.00 


Microf i Im Projects 


0.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,000.00 


Annual Audit 


4,600.00 


13,900.00 


13,900.00 


14,900.00 


0.00 


3,600.00 



-183- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 





AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 










FY 94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPR I AT ION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 




FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Ambulance Billing 


0.00 


10,000.00 


10, 000.00 


9,339.37 


0.00 


660.63 


Town Report 


0.00 


5,500.00 


5,500.00 


5 , 313 .63 


0.00 


186.37 


Hazardous Mat. Consult. Services 


0.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2,500.00 


Sewer Maintenance 


0.00 


20,000.00 


20, 000.00 


16,335 .90 


0.00 


3,664. 10 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


70,000.00 


1 ,940.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1 ,940.00 


Insurance & Bonds 


1 ,204.50 


661 ,987.00 


637,487.00 


550,357.51 


1 ,400.00 


86,933.99 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 


239, 108.40 


1 ,751,205.00 


1 , 780, 556.31 


1 ,969,696.59 


49,968. 12 


(0.00) 


Unclassified Subtotal 


244,912.90 


2,737,227.00 


2,678,913.29 


2,747,998.11 


59,904.62 


115,923.46 


STATUTORY CHARGES: 














Amt. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


0.00 


26,000.00 


26,000.00 


10,709.49 


10,559.70 


4,730.81 


Current Year Overlay 


0.00 


600,922.00 


600,922.00 


600,922.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Prior Year Overlay Deficit 


, 00 


f 5 , UoB .UU 


r3,Uoo.UU 


1^ , UOO.UU 


. 00 


0.00 


Retirement Contributions 


0.00 


1 / c/ Q 1 / nn 
1 , hOh , OIh . UU 


1 / c/ (11/ nn 


\ , 3 ro, hU/ . HH 


. 00 


78,406.56 


Teachers Retirement 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


County Retirement Tax 


0.00 


, UVr .UU 


43, UVf . UU 


21 ,548.28 


21 ,548.72 


0.00 


Offset Items 


0.00 


32,213.00 


32,213.00 


32,213.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Special Education 


0.00 


2,038.00 


2, 038. 00 


3,98o.00 


0. 00 


( 1 ,930.00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


0.00 


oVl , 1U1 .UU 


3yi , lU 1 .UU 


3yU,'»5 1 .UU 


0.00 


650.00 


MArC (Cn.oOo OT ivoj; 


0.00 


3 , 75 2 . 00 


3 , 752 . 00 






0.00 


CMVI Non-Renewal 








/ onn nn 

H , VoU . UU 


000 


i'»,you.uu; 


Energy Cons. Pro. Assessment 


0.00 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Metro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 


0.00 


4,436.00 


4,436.00 


4,436.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Mosquito Control Program 


0.00 


22,960.00 


22,960.00 


23,495.00 


0.00 


(535.00) 


M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 


0.00 


1,347,656.00 


1,347,656.00 


1,347,656.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


0.00 


4,023,973.00 


4,023,973.00 


3,915,542.21 


32,108.42 


76,322.37 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 














Police Dept. Cruisers 


0.00 


55,380.00 


55,380.00 


53,980.00 


0.00 


1,400.00 


Fire Dept. Pumper 


0.00 


230,000.00 


230,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


230,000.00 


Highway Div. Pickup Trucks 


8,130.00 


12,869.00 


12,869.00 


20,731.50 


0.00 


267.50 


Highway Div. Heavy Duty Trucks 


0.00 


0.00 


50,703.00 


0.00 


50,703.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings Telephone System 


0.00 


51,795.00 


51,795.00 


26,657.73 


25,137.27 


0.00 


Public Buildings Furnace-Town Hall 


0.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


24,985.00 


0.00 


15.00 


Public Buildings DPW Lift 


0.00 


0.00 


9.000.00 


9,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings Woburn St. Roof 


0.00 


34,214.00 


34,214.00 


34,214.00 


0.00 


0.00 


School Computer Equipment 


0.00 


16,500.00 


16,500.00 


16,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


School Classroom Furniture 


0.00 


30,000.00 


30,000.00 


27,276.00 


0.00 


2,724.00 



-184- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1994 





AMT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 










FY 94 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 




FISCAL 1993 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1994 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


8,130.00 


455,758.00 


515,461.00 


213,344.23 


75,840.27 


234,406.50 


WARRANT ARTICLES: 














Memorial Day/Veterans Day 


0.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


3,561.08 


0.00 


1,438.92 


Lease Quarters-Marines, VFW, Legion 


0.00 


2,250.00 


2,250.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


750.00 


Sewer Legal Expenses 


0.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 


0.00 


8,750.00 


8,750.00 


6,561.08 


0.00 


2,188.92 


GRAND TOTAL 


662,949.74 


34,992,491.00 35,094,923.20 34,578,023.20 


597,687.90 


582,161.84 



-185- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
UATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 





APTIIAI PfCTAI 
AL 1 UAL r 1 aLAL 


ALIUAL riaLAL 


ATTIIAI CrCPAl 

ALIUAL rldLAL 


orurut IPC - 


1992 


1993 


1994 


UATER RECEIVABLES RATES 


2,546.351.30 


2,404,215.47 


2,691,225.68 


WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 


10,941.05 


11,974.79 


16,414.11 


WATER RECEIVABLES INSTALLATIONS 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 


20,929.75 


15,227.93 


49,644.51 


WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 


89,664.67 


66,100.00 


85.350.00 


WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT. 


29,836.69 


29,865.29 


31,112.29 




0.00 


3 840.00 




WATER LIENS 


96 183.07 


95 793 . 02 


10"? 70ft ?A 
1 \ij 1 r uo • CO 


SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 


2,978.06 


3,448.48 


4,338.85 


CAPITAL PROJECT CLOSEOUTS 


0.00 


47,465.00 


0.00 


MISCELLANEOUS 


13,441 . 16 


18,767.61 


31 953.87 


BOND PROCEEDS 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


REIMBURSEMENTS 


0.00 


43,749.00 


82,164.88 


TOTAL REVENUE: 


2,810,325.75 


2,740,446.59 


3,140,672.45 


OPERATING COSTS 


1,795,898.97 


1.714,234.10 


1,420,289.35 


PROJECT CLOSEOUTS 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


CONSTRUCTION COSTS 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


CLOSEOUT TO MAINT. & OPERATIONS 


0.00 


47.465.00 


0.00 


TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 


1,795,898.97 


1,761,699.10 


1,420,289.35 


EXCESS REVENUES OVER OPERATING COSTS 


1,014,426.78 


978.747.49 


1,720,383.10 


TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 








DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 








AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 


1,164,506.00 


1.298.693.00 


1,473,987.00 


EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 








TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 


(150,079.22) 


(319,945.51) 


246,396.10 


TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 


500,745.50 


350,666.28 


30,720.77 


TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 


350,666.28 


30,720.77 


277,116.87 



-186- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



Town Meeting Dates 

Initial Project Authorization 



(ENGINEERING) 

STREET SEWER N.E. SEWER MAIN ST. 

BETTERMENTS CONSTRUCTION INTERCEPTOR SEWER 

4/23/88 4/22/89 



95,550 1,210,000 



450,000 



FUEL OIL TANK HIGH SCHOOL 
REPLACEMENT RENOVATION 
4/23/88 



TOTAL 
(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 



420,000 7,750,000 10,672,550 



REVENUES: 

Intergovernmental 

Total Revenue 

EXPENDITURES: 

Capital Outlay 

Total Expenditures 
Excess of revenues over/under 

expendi tures 

Other Financial Sources(uses): 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds & Notes 
Operating transfers 

Total Other Financial 
Sources/Uses 

Excess of Revenues 

and other sources over 
(under) expenditures and 
other uses 

FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1993 

FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1994 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
(43,121.13) 



0.00 
0.00 



395.22 
(395.22) 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
(6,409.75) 



(43,121.13) (395.22) 0.00 0.00 (6,409.75) 

43,121.13 234,741.97 7,266.68 121,479.43 6,409.75 
0.00 234,346.75 7,266.68 121,479.43 0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



395.22 
(395.22) 



0.00 



0.00 (49,530.88) 



0.00 (49,926.10) 
13,002.92 426,021.88 
13,002.92 376,095.78 



-187- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1994 





YEAR 


YEAR 




PRINCIPAL 


OUTSTANDING 


BOND 


BOND 


OUTSTANDING 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


AMOUNT 


JUNE 30, 1993 


ADDITIONS 


RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30, 1994 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Sewer Bonds 


07-77 


07-98 


5.0 


1,865,000 


400,000 


- 


80,000 


320,000 


Sewer Bonds 


05-82 


05-97 


9.5-10.4 


2,890,000 


690,000 




200.000 


490,000 


Street Bonds 


11-90 


11-98 


6.8-6.85 


110,000 


80,000 


- 


15.000 


65.000 


Remodel ing 


11-90 


1 1 - 98 


6.85 


420,000 


Tin nrtrt 
310, 000 




55.000 


255.000 


Sewer Planning 


11-90 


11-94 


6.8-6.85 


337,500 


110,000 




110.000 





Sewer - Main Street 


11-90 


11-98 


6.8-6.85 


745,000 


595,000 




75 . 000 


520,000 


School Boilers 


11-90 


11-99 


6.8-6.85 


852,500 


660,000 




95.000 


565,000 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 






7,220,000 


2,845,000 





630,000 


2,215,000 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















High School Bonds 


01-85 


01-95 


8 


6,500,000 


1,300.000 




650,000 


650,000 


School Renovation 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


1,250,000 


470,000 




130,000 


340,000 


Water Plant 


07-79 


07-98 


5.25 


2,735,000 


750,000 




150,000 


600,000 


Water Plant 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


3,700,000 


1.480,000 




370,000 


1,110,000 


Water Land Purchase 


08-92 


08-96 


4.25 


700,000 


700,000 




175,000 


525,000 


Water Standpipe 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-8.85 


1,425,000 


1,155,000 




135,000 


1,020,000 


TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT 1 


LIMIT 






16,310,000 


5,855,000 





1,610,000 


4,245,000 


TOTAL DEBT 








23,530,000 


8,700,000 





2,240,000 


6,460,000 



-188- 



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-189- 



Boards Conunittees & Commissions 



Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 



Building 



Time 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 
ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 
ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 
CARTER LECTURE FUND 
CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM. 

ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

PLANNING BOARD 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

RECYCLING ADVISORY COMM. 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 



2nd fii 4th Tuesday < 
2nd Wednesday 
2nd & 4th Thursday : 
As Needed 

As Needed - Minimum 
of 2 meetings per year 

1st & 3rd Wednesday ? 



Town Hall 
Arts Center 
Town Hall 

Cemetery 



3rd Tuesday 

2nd Tuesday 9 
1st & 3rd Monday 4 
2nd Monday 4 
1st Tuesday 

2nd Thursday 9 
3rd Tuesday 
Monthly 

1st & 3rd Tuesday 9 
1st Thursday 8 
Monthly 
3rd Thursday 
2nd & 4th Tuesday 
2nd Monday 12 
2nd & 4th Wednesday LIB 
2nd & 4th Monday 9 
As Needed 

AUD Town Hall 



7 : 00 p.m 

7 : 00 p.m 

9 : 30 a.m 

1:00 p.m 



Town Hall 


7: 


;00 


p.m 


Town Hall 


6: 


;00 


p.m 


Sr. Center 


2: 


;30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7 : 


;30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


5: 


; 15 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7: 


;30 


p.m 


Deming Way 


7: 


;30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7: 


;30 


p.m 


Library 


1: 


i30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7; 


;00 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7! 


:30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7; 


;00 


p.m 


Town Hall 


6; 


;30 


p.m 


Chamber Office 


7 ; 


;00 


p.m 


Shaw. Tech. 


7; 


:30 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7; 


:00 


p.m 


High School 


7; 


:00 


p.m 


Town Hall 


7; 


:00 


p.m 



6:00 p.m 



-190- 



For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Arts Center 
Assessor 

Board of Selectmen Office 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Credit Union 

Department of Public Works 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/ Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veteran's Agent 
Water Department 
Water Pumping Station 



Telephone Number 

694-2029 

658-5071 (Complaints) 
658-7845 (Missing/Adoption) 

657- 3887 

658- 3675 
658-3311 
658-4531 
658-3901 
658-3531 
658-5394 
658-4481 

657- 7595 

658- 4499 
658-3531 

658-3346 (Business Phone) 

658-3200 (EMERGENCY) 

658-4298 

658-8531 

658-2967 

657- 4625 (TDD) 

658- 4298 
658-8238 
658-3223 
658-5071 

658-3331 (EMERGENCY) 

657- 8368 (TDD) 

658- 3017 
658-4270 
694-6000 
658-2030 
658-3311 
694-1417 (TDD) 
658-3531 
658-2809 
694-2040 
658-3116 
658-4711 



Please Save for Future Reference 



A special "thank you" to all those who contributed 
photographs for the enhancement of our Annual Report. 



7593 21 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LlS RAHf 
WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETI* 



"I do not mind, and never have cared about, the curses 
and calumny that have come my way. What I care 
about is what you care about ~ decency, justice; and 
an abhorrence for what is wrong and an intolerance for 
mediocrity, . . " 

Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez 

Recipient of 1994 Profile in Courage Award 

John F. Kennedy Foundation 



3''i!3?|oi46 0785 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room